Effect of a Drinker Identity on Smoking-Related Information Processing and Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621014
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Report
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Effect of a Drinker Identity on Smoking-Related Information Processing and Behavior
Author(s):
Lee, Chia-Kuei
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Lambda
Abstract:

Purpose: Drinking and smoking frequently co-occur in undergraduate students. A drinker identity − a valued identity related to alcohol consumption behaviors − predicts high levels of alcohol use and alcohol problems. Since alcohol use and tobacco use are often paired in the social context, smoking-related information, behaviors and routines may be encoded into a drinker identity. This study investigated the role of the drinker identity (drinker self-schema) on smoking-related information processing and behavior in undergraduate students who drink and smoke but do not self-identify as smokers. Also, the effects of early alcohol experiences with alcohol on the drinker self-schema were also explored. 

Methods: This project included two phases, an online survey and an in-person session. The online survey was used to examine the self-schemas and the determinants of the drinker self-schema (parental alcohol problems, age of alcohol initiation, high school experiences of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems, friends’ alcohol use in high school, and socio-demographics). During the in-person session, information processing indicators (endorsements, response latency time, and recall) of smoking stimuli were measured using validated cognitive tasks. Finally, the Timeline Followback methodology was used to measure alcohol and tobacco use in the last 90 days.

Results: Based on the online survey study, a structural equation model showed that more parental alcohol problems predicted early alcohol initiation which in turn predicted more high school friends’ drinking. More high school friends’ drinking and early onset predicted higher drinking behaviors and more alcohol problems in high school. More alcohol problems in high school predicted the higher drinker self-schema score, which in turn, predicted higher frequency of alcohol and tobacco use in college. Results of the information processing tasks showed that higher drinker self-schema scores were associated with higher endorsements of positive smoking-related attributes and lower endorsements of negative smoking-related attributes. No significant associations were found for information processing indicators including response latency and recall.

Conclusions and Implications: Findings support the developmental model that early experiences with alcohol use lead to formation of a drinker self-schema which motivates alcohol and tobacco use. Results also partially support the cross-substance facilitation effects of the drinker self-schema on smoking-related information processing and smoking behavior. Interventions to delay early alcohol initiation or limit adolescent alcohol use and problems may prevent the development of a drinker self-schema. Interventions that target the drinker self-schema may reduce the levels of both alcohol and tobacco use.

Keywords:
alcohol use; tobacco use; identity; college students
CINAHL Headings:
Alcohol Drinking; Self Concept; Smoking--Evaluation; Smoking; Students, College
Repository Posting Date:
14-Oct-2016
Date of Publication:
14-Oct-2016
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeReporten
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleEffect of a Drinker Identity on Smoking-Related Information Processing and Behavioren_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chia-Kueien
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Lambdaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621014-
dc.description.abstract<p class="DefaultCxSpFirst"><strong><span>Purpose:</span></strong><span> Drinking and smoking frequently co-occur in undergraduate students. A drinker identity − a valued identity related to alcohol consumption behaviors − predicts high levels of alcohol use and alcohol problems. Since alcohol use and tobacco use are often paired in the social context, smoking-related information, behaviors and routines may be encoded into a drinker identity. This study investigated the role of the drinker identity (drinker self-schema) on smoking-related information processing and behavior in undergraduate students who drink and smoke but do not self-identify as smokers. Also, the effects of early alcohol experiences with alcohol on the drinker self-schema were also explored.  </span></p> <p class="Default"><strong><span>Methods: </span></strong><span>This project included two phases, an online survey and an in-person session. The online survey was used to examine the self-schemas and the determinants of the drinker self-schema (parental alcohol problems, age of alcohol initiation, high school experiences of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems, friends’ alcohol use in high school, and socio-demographics). During the in-person session, information processing indicators (endorsements, response latency time, and recall) of smoking stimuli were measured using validated cognitive tasks. Finally, the Timeline Followback methodology was used to measure alcohol and tobacco use in the last 90 days.</span></p> <p class="Default"><strong><span>Results: </span></strong><span>Based on the online survey study, a structural equation model showed that more parental alcohol problems predicted early alcohol initiation which in turn predicted more high school friends’ drinking. More high school friends’ drinking and early onset predicted higher drinking behaviors and more alcohol problems in high school. More alcohol problems in high school predicted the higher drinker self-schema score, which in turn, predicted higher frequency of alcohol and tobacco use in college. Results of the information processing tasks showed that higher drinker self-schema scores were associated with higher endorsements of positive smoking-related attributes and lower endorsements of negative smoking-related attributes. No significant associations were found for information processing indicators including response latency and recall.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Conclusions and Implications: </span></strong><span>Findings </span><span>support the developmental model that early experiences with alcohol use lead to formation of a drinker self-schema which motivates alcohol and tobacco use. Results also partially support the cross-substance facilitation effects of the drinker self-schema on </span><span>smoking-related information processing and smoking behavior.</span><span> Interventions to delay early alcohol initiation or limit adolescent alcohol use and problems may prevent the development of a drinker self-schema. </span><span>Interventions that target the drinker self-schema may reduce the levels of both alcohol and tobacco use.</span></p>en
dc.subjectalcohol useen
dc.subjecttobacco useen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectcollege studentsen
dc.subject.cinahlAlcohol Drinkingen
dc.subject.cinahlSelf Concepten
dc.subject.cinahlSmoking--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlSmokingen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Collegeen
dc.date.available2016-10-14T20:35:28Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-14-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T20:35:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
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