HIV Task Shifting from Physicians to Nurses in Nigeria: Examining the Correlates of Nurse Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621109
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
HIV Task Shifting from Physicians to Nurses in Nigeria: Examining the Correlates of Nurse Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction
Author(s):
Iwu, Emilia Ngozi; Holzemer, William L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Mu
Author Details:
Emilia Ngozi Iwu, PhD, RN, APNC FWACN, Email: iwu@rutgers.edu, iwus@comcast.net; William L. Holzemer, RN, PhD, FAAN, Email: holzemer@rutgers.edu, Faculty page: http://nursing.rutgers.edu/directory/bios/holzemer_william.html
Abstract:

With 3% global health workforce, the African region accounts for 25% of global disease burden and the largest proportion of people living with HIV. Although task sharing between physicians and nurses improved access to ART, the process also led to nurses being assigned roles beyond their scope of practice. In a sample of 399 nurses in “task-shifted” roles, this study examined the correlates of self-efficacy and job satisfaction in Nigeria. We surveyed of 508 nurses from 8 of 36 states in Nigeria. There were 399 usable responses (a response rate of 79%). The mean age and years in nursing practice were 42 (SD = 9.1) and 17 (SD = 9.2); 86% worked in Government hospitals, 26% in Tertiary hospitals, 76% were female and 70% Registered Nurse/Midwives. Over 95% received training and mentoring and 82% had previous HIV experience. Demographic and setting variables were correlated with self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Years in nursing practice negatively correlated with Self-Efficacy for HIV task sharing. The correlates of Job Satisfaction were: years in nursing practice; dual licensure as Nurse/Midwife; working in tertiary hospital; older age; male gender; duration of training and mentoring. Working in secondary and primary health centers as well as faith based hospitals were correlated with increased job dissatisfaction. The nurses reported system related challenges which negatively affected their job satisfaction. These findings have critical implications for burnout, retention and quality service delivery. System-specific strategies such as: complementary staffing; continuing education; certification; updated policies, curricula and scope of practice are needed to support nurses working in task-shifted roles.

Keywords:
NIMART; Nurse-managed ART; Task Sharing; Task Shifting; Job Satisfaction; Self-efficacy
MeSH:
Job Satisfaction
CINAHL Headings:
HIV Infections; HIV Infections--Prevention and Control; HIV Infections--Prevention and Control--Nigeria; Nursing Role; Nursing Role--Nigeria; Nurses--Utilization; Self-Efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
20-Oct-2016
Date of Publication:
20-Oct-2016
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
The first part of this research has been published as: Iwu, E. N., & Holzemer, W. L. (2014). Task shifting of HIV management from doctors to nurses in Africa: Clinical outcomes and evidence on nurse self-efficacy and job satisfaction. AIDS Care, 26(1), 42-52. doi:10.1080/09540121.2013.793278; Sigma Theta Sigma Theta Tau International, 2014 Global Nursing Research Grant

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleHIV Task Shifting from Physicians to Nurses in Nigeria: Examining the Correlates of Nurse Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfactionen_US
dc.contributor.authorIwu, Emilia Ngozien
dc.contributor.authorHolzemer, William L.en
dc.contributor.departmentEta Muen
dc.author.detailsEmilia Ngozi Iwu, PhD, RN, APNC FWACN, Email: iwu@rutgers.edu, iwus@comcast.net; William L. Holzemer, RN, PhD, FAAN, Email: holzemer@rutgers.edu, Faculty page: http://nursing.rutgers.edu/directory/bios/holzemer_william.htmlen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621109-
dc.description.abstract<p>With 3% global health workforce, the African region accounts for 25% of global disease burden and the largest proportion of people living with HIV. Although task sharing between physicians and nurses improved access to ART, the process also led to nurses being assigned roles beyond their scope of practice. In a sample of 399 nurses in “task-shifted” roles, this study examined the correlates of self-efficacy and job satisfaction in Nigeria. We surveyed of 508 nurses from 8 of 36 states in Nigeria. There were 399 usable responses (a response rate of 79%). The mean age and years in nursing practice were 42 (SD = 9.1) and 17 (SD = 9.2); 86% worked in Government hospitals, 26% in Tertiary hospitals, 76% were female and 70% Registered Nurse/Midwives. Over 95% received training and mentoring and 82% had previous HIV experience. Demographic and setting variables were correlated with self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Years in nursing practice negatively correlated with Self-Efficacy for HIV task sharing. The correlates of Job Satisfaction were: years in nursing practice; dual licensure as Nurse/Midwife; working in tertiary hospital; older age; male gender; duration of training and mentoring. Working in secondary and primary health centers as well as faith based hospitals were correlated with increased job dissatisfaction. The nurses reported system related challenges which negatively affected their job satisfaction. These findings have critical implications for burnout, retention and quality service delivery. System-specific strategies such as: complementary staffing; continuing education; certification; updated policies, curricula and scope of practice are needed to support nurses working in task-shifted roles.</p>en
dc.subjectNIMARTen
dc.subjectNurse-managed ARTen
dc.subjectTask Sharingen
dc.subjectTask Shiftingen
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen
dc.subject.cinahlHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.cinahlHIV Infections--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlHIV Infections--Prevention and Control--Nigeriaen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Roleen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Role--Nigeriaen
dc.subject.cinahlNurses--Utilizationen
dc.subject.cinahlSelf-Efficacyen
dc.date.available2016-10-20T20:07:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-20-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-20T20:07:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionThe first part of this research has been published as: Iwu, E. N., & Holzemer, W. L. (2014). Task shifting of HIV management from doctors to nurses in Africa: Clinical outcomes and evidence on nurse self-efficacy and job satisfaction. AIDS Care, 26(1), 42-52. doi:10.1080/09540121.2013.793278en
dc.descriptionSigma Theta Sigma Theta Tau International, 2014 Global Nursing Research Granten
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