2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621140
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Third Trimester Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in Pregnant Teens
Author(s):
Smith, Shauna; Allen, Jennifer; Ilchak, Debra
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Shauna Marie Smith, BSN, RN, WHNP, DNP Student; Jennifer Allen, DNP, RN, WHNP-BC; Debra Ilchak, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CNE
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a practice change in a clinic caring for underserved pregnant teens to align with national standard of care guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which recommends routine third trimester chlamydia and gonorrhea screening in high risk populations.

Summary: Despite national recommendations, providers are under screening and missing opportunities to screen young, at risk women, especially in pregnancy. Only an estimated 59% of pregnant women in the United States (U.S.) are receiving chlamydia and gonorrhea screening (Blatt el al., 2012). Pregnant teens are at higher risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and infection during the third trimester is not uncommon. In an urban, teen pregnancy clinic in the Southwestern U.S., patients were screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea at the initial prenatal visit and not routinely again during pregnancy. For this project, a practice change was initiated to follow the CDC and USPSTF recommendations. Pregnant patients under the age of 25 were rescreened for chlamydia and gonorrhea infection during their third trimester on or after 35 weeks of gestation. As a strategy to ensure compliance with the practice change, providers conducted this screening along with the Group B Streptococcus test which was already routinely performed in the clinic.

Outcomes: At 10 weeks post-implementation, a chart review was completed to assess provider compliance with screening during the third trimester and the rate of positive results for chlamydia and gonorrhea. All patients (n=10, 100%) who were eligible for routine third trimester screening were screened appropriately. Patients were screened in the third trimester at a mean of 35.8 (SD=7.8) weeks gestation. One patient screened positive for chlamydia at the third trimester screening, resulting in a 10% positivity for chlamydia in the patient sample.

Implications for Women's Health: Chlamydia and gonorrhea are the highest reported STIs in the United States among persons 15-24 years of age (CDC, 2015). Screening by providers is important as these infections are often asymptomatic but are associated with adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Providers following national screening guidelines can help reduce these potential complications and improve maternal and infant health.

Keywords:
sexually transmitted infections; pregnancy; teens
Repository Posting Date:
7-Nov-2016
Date of Publication:
7-Nov-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
19th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conference
Conference Host:
Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleThird Trimester Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in Pregnant Teensen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Shaunaen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorIlchak, Debraen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsShauna Marie Smith, BSN, RN, WHNP, DNP Student; Jennifer Allen, DNP, RN, WHNP-BC; Debra Ilchak, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621140-
dc.description.abstract<p>Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a practice change in a clinic caring for underserved pregnant teens to align with national standard of care guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which recommends routine third trimester chlamydia and gonorrhea screening in high risk populations.</p> <p>Summary: Despite national recommendations, providers are under screening and missing opportunities to screen young, at risk women, especially in pregnancy. Only an estimated 59% of pregnant women in the United States (U.S.) are receiving chlamydia and gonorrhea screening (Blatt el al., 2012). Pregnant teens are at higher risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and infection during the third trimester is not uncommon. In an urban, teen pregnancy clinic in the Southwestern U.S., patients were screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea at the initial prenatal visit and not routinely again during pregnancy. For this project, a practice change was initiated to follow the CDC and USPSTF recommendations. Pregnant patients under the age of 25 were rescreened for chlamydia and gonorrhea infection during their third trimester on or after 35 weeks of gestation. As a strategy to ensure compliance with the practice change, providers conducted this screening along with the Group B Streptococcus test which was already routinely performed in the clinic.</p> <p>Outcomes: At 10 weeks post-implementation, a chart review was completed to assess provider compliance with screening during the third trimester and the rate of positive results for chlamydia and gonorrhea. All patients (n=10, 100%) who were eligible for routine third trimester screening were screened appropriately. Patients were screened in the third trimester at a mean of 35.8 (SD=7.8) weeks gestation. One patient screened positive for chlamydia at the third trimester screening, resulting in a 10% positivity for chlamydia in the patient sample. </p> <p>Implications for Women's Health: Chlamydia and gonorrhea are the highest reported STIs in the United States among persons 15-24 years of age (CDC, 2015). Screening by providers is important as these infections are often asymptomatic but are associated with adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Providers following national screening guidelines can help reduce these potential complications and improve maternal and infant health.</p>en
dc.subjectsexually transmitted infectionsen
dc.subjectpregnancyen
dc.subjectteensen
dc.date.available2016-11-07T20:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-07-
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-07T20:41:51Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name19th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conferenceen
dc.conference.hostNurse Practitioners in Women's Healthen
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen
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