2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621145
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Patient Satisfaction and Provider Preference with OTC Topical Azole Antifungal Agents
Author(s):
Martens, Mark
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mark G. Martens, MD, FACOG
Abstract:

Purpose: In the past, patients needed a healthcare provider (HCP) to treat vulvovaginal candida infections (VVC). With the advert of OTC azole treatments, most patients self-treated prior to contacting their HCP. Therefore, most HCP's receive little feedback on the efficacy and satisfaction with OTC products, except with treatment failures. This project sought to give feedback to HCP's regarding the efficacy and satisfaction for OTC agents.

Methodology: From June to October 2015, 2,961 NP/CNM/PA's were enrolled in a topical OTC VVC treatment program. They were given 4 azole topical antifungals to dispense, from 1 to 7 days and surveys regarding their selection of various agents, and patients received an anonymous survey card asking about their satisfaction and treatment success.

Results: As most women treat themselves, it's assumed that many patients seek office treatment only after failure. However, it appears that most women (95%) are treated successfully and are satisfied with OTC therapies. As 80% of patients did not give feedback to HCP's, there may be a bias to HCP's only from patients who failed therapy. As new safety concerns are arising with oral, prescription antifungals, it is helpful for HCP's to regain an understanding of patient responses to OTC treatment. HCP's were most comfortable dispensing the traditional 7 day regimen and highly active one dose tioconazole ointment for reasons of fluconazole safety or failures. Therefore, current OTC topical azole treatment for VVA appears to be highly effective with excellent patient satisfaction. All forms (ointment, cream, and suppository) and dosing regimens were equally acceptable to patients regardless of HCP preferences.

Keywords:
candidiasis; yeast; Monistat
Repository Posting Date:
7-Nov-2016
Date of Publication:
7-Nov-2016
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
19th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conference
Conference Host:
Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titlePatient Satisfaction and Provider Preference with OTC Topical Azole Antifungal Agentsen
dc.contributor.authorMartens, Marken
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMark G. Martens, MD, FACOGen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621145-
dc.description.abstract<p>Purpose: In the past, patients needed a healthcare provider (HCP) to treat vulvovaginal candida infections (VVC). With the advert of OTC azole treatments, most patients self-treated prior to contacting their HCP. Therefore, most HCP's receive little feedback on the efficacy and satisfaction with OTC products, except with treatment failures. This project sought to give feedback to HCP's regarding the efficacy and satisfaction for OTC agents. </p> <p>Methodology: From June to October 2015, 2,961 NP/CNM/PA's were enrolled in a topical OTC VVC treatment program. They were given 4 azole topical antifungals to dispense, from 1 to 7 days and surveys regarding their selection of various agents, and patients received an anonymous survey card asking about their satisfaction and treatment success. </p> <p>Results: As most women treat themselves, it's assumed that many patients seek office treatment only after failure. However, it appears that most women (95%) are treated successfully and are satisfied with OTC therapies. As 80% of patients did not give feedback to HCP's, there may be a bias to HCP's only from patients who failed therapy. As new safety concerns are arising with oral, prescription antifungals, it is helpful for HCP's to regain an understanding of patient responses to OTC treatment. HCP's were most comfortable dispensing the traditional 7 day regimen and highly active one dose tioconazole ointment for reasons of fluconazole safety or failures. Therefore, current OTC topical azole treatment for VVA appears to be highly effective with excellent patient satisfaction. All forms (ointment, cream, and suppository) and dosing regimens were equally acceptable to patients regardless of HCP preferences.</p>en
dc.subjectcandidiasisen
dc.subjectyeasten
dc.subjectMonistaten
dc.date.available2016-11-07T20:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-07-
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-07T20:41:51Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name19th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conferenceen
dc.conference.hostNurse Practitioners in Women's Healthen
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.