11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621162
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Diabetes Management in the African American Community
Author(s):
Ella Porter-Wright
Additional Author Information:
Ella Porter-Wright, DNP FNP-BC
Advisors:
Morrisey, Carolyn; Suttle, Catherine M.; Singleton, Monnieque
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to explore the effectiveness of utilizing an evidence based diabetes tool kit and a physical activity program in the management of A1C levels >8.0 of African American adult patients.

Data sources: A sample of 25 African American adult patients ages 21-75 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were recruited from a local Community Health Center for this cross-sectional study design. The data has been collected using administrative data from electronic medical records and utilizing an evidenced-based diabetes tool kit from the American Diabetes Association and a physical activity program which consists of a thirty-minute aerobic walking exercise.

Conclusion: The project participants consisted of 13 African American women and 12 African American men. The results suggest patients are more likely to adhere to checking their blood sugars, manage their diets, and participate in moderate physical activity when they have access to resources and one on one discussions with their provider. The participation and adherence to the project guidelines were met 95% among the females and 80% among the male participants. The results conclude that A1C levels can be significantly decreased using the diabetes tool kit in conjunction with physical activity if there is consistency in daily routine and adequate follow up with provider.

Implications to practice: African Americans are disproportionately impacted by the adverse effects of diabetes mellitus. Cost effective strategies must be identified to manage their diabetes and A1C levels. This project addresses strategies to fill gaps in practice for African Americans who lack economic resources and provider interest in helping to manage their diabetes mellitus.

Keywords:
African American; Diabetes; physical activity; A1C levels
MeSH:
Diabetes Mellitus
CINAHL Headings:
Blacks; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated--Analysis; Diabetes Mellitus--Therapy; Therapeutic Exercise; Physical Activity
Sponsors:
Singleton Health Center
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2016-12-07T22:21:26Z
Date of Publication:
2016-12-07

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMorrisey, Carolynen
dc.contributor.advisorSuttle, Catherine M.en
dc.contributor.advisorSingleton, Monniequeen
dc.contributor.authorElla Porter-Wrighten
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-07T22:21:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-07T22:21:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621162-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong>The purpose of this project was to explore the effectiveness of utilizing an evidence based diabetes tool kit and a physical activity program in the management of A1C levels >8.0 of African American adult patients.</p> <p><strong>Data sources: </strong>A sample of 25 African American adult patients ages 21-75 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were recruited from a local Community Health Center for this cross-sectional study design. The data has been collected using administrative data from electronic medical records and utilizing an evidenced-based diabetes tool kit from the American Diabetes Association and a physical activity program which consists of a thirty-minute aerobic walking exercise.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The project participants consisted of 13 African American women and 12 African American men. The results suggest patients are more likely to adhere to checking their blood sugars, manage their diets, and participate in moderate physical activity when they have access to resources and one on one discussions with their provider. The participation and adherence to the project guidelines were met 95% among the females and 80% among the male participants. The results conclude that A1C levels can be significantly decreased using the diabetes tool kit in conjunction with physical activity if there is consistency in daily routine and adequate follow up with provider.</p> <p><strong>Implications to practice: </strong>African Americans are disproportionately impacted by the adverse effects of diabetes mellitus. Cost effective strategies must be identified to manage their diabetes and A1C levels. This project addresses strategies to fill gaps in practice for African Americans who lack economic resources and provider interest in helping to manage their diabetes mellitus.</p>en
dc.description.sponsorshipSingleton Health Centeren
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen
dc.subjectDiabetesen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectA1C levelsen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.titleDiabetes Management in the African American Communityen
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsElla Porter-Wright, DNP FNP-BCen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlBlacksen
dc.subject.cinahlHemoglobin A, Glycosylateden
dc.subject.cinahlHemoglobin A, Glycosylated--Analysisen
dc.subject.cinahlDiabetes Mellitus--Therapyen
dc.subject.cinahlTherapeutic Exerciseen
dc.subject.cinahlPhysical Activityen
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