Undergraduate Sorority Students' Perceptions of Current Body Size, Ideal Body Size, Eating Habits, and the Relation to Body Image Dissatisfaction

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621169
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Undergraduate Sorority Students' Perceptions of Current Body Size, Ideal Body Size, Eating Habits, and the Relation to Body Image Dissatisfaction
Author(s):
Beiter, Julie; Kaufmann, Judith; Cline, Thomas W.
Additional Author Information:
Julie Beiter DNP (c), RN
Advisors:
Kaufmann, Judith
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Robert Morris University
Abstract:

Disordered eating patterns and body discontent are widespread in Western society, especially among young women.  Many adopt the “thin ideal,” a belief that women should have very slender bodies with small waists and minimal body fat.  This body image is shaped by television, social media, and magazines.  Research has shown that women who internalize the thin ideal are more likely to have concerns with body image dissatisfaction and disordered eating habits.  The goal of the current descriptive correlational study was to examine relationships between perceived current body size, imagined ideal body size, actual body weight, eating patterns, and body satisfaction in undergraduate women.  Fifty-three undergraduate sorority members completed a self-report survey that included scales to evaluate disordered eating (Eating Attitudes Test, EAT-26), body image satisfaction (Body Shape Questionnaire, BSQ-16), and weight perception (Photographic Figure Rating Scale, PFRS). Their actual BMIs were then calculated and correlated with their self reports on the three scales.  Results suggest that there was a high degree of body positivity in this sample as actual current body weight and perception of ideal weight were significantly correlated.  Those with the greatest discordance between their current weights and imagined ideal weights were at the highest risk for disordered eating habits and body image dissatisfaction.  It appears the thin ideal continues to affect young women as those in higher weight ranges were more likely to have feelings of shame and inadequacy when comparing themselves with slimmer women. 

Keywords:
Thin-ideal; disordered eating; perception of body size; body image dissatisfaction; BMI
CINAHL Headings:
Body Image; Eating Disorders; Eating Disorders--Psychosocial Factors; Perceptual Distortion; Students, College
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2016-12-21T18:27:34Z
Date of Publication:
2016-12-21

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorKaufmann, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorBeiter, Julieen
dc.contributor.authorKaufmann, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorCline, Thomas W.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T18:27:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-21T18:27:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-21-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621169-
dc.description.abstract<p>Disordered eating patterns and body discontent are widespread in Western society, especially among young women.  Many adopt the “thin ideal,” a belief that women should have very slender bodies with small waists and minimal body fat.  This body image is shaped by television, social media, and magazines.  Research has shown that women who internalize the thin ideal are more likely to have concerns with body image dissatisfaction and disordered eating habits.  The goal of the current descriptive correlational study was to examine relationships between perceived current body size, imagined ideal body size, actual body weight, eating patterns, and body satisfaction in undergraduate women.  Fifty-three undergraduate sorority members completed a self-report survey that included scales to evaluate disordered eating (Eating Attitudes Test, EAT-26), body image satisfaction (Body Shape Questionnaire, BSQ-16), and weight perception (Photographic Figure Rating Scale, PFRS). Their actual BMIs were then calculated and correlated with their self reports on the three scales.  Results suggest that there was a high degree of body positivity in this sample as actual current body weight and perception of ideal weight were significantly correlated.  Those with the greatest discordance between their current weights and imagined ideal weights were at the highest risk for disordered eating habits and body image dissatisfaction.  It appears the thin ideal continues to affect young women as those in higher weight ranges were more likely to have feelings of shame and inadequacy when comparing themselves with slimmer women. </p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectThin-idealen
dc.subjectdisordered eatingen
dc.subjectperception of body sizeen
dc.subjectbody image dissatisfactionen
dc.subjectBMIen
dc.titleUndergraduate Sorority Students' Perceptions of Current Body Size, Ideal Body Size, Eating Habits, and the Relation to Body Image Dissatisfactionen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorRobert Morris Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en_US
dc.primary-author.detailsJulie Beiter DNP (c), RNen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlBody Imageen
dc.subject.cinahlEating Disordersen
dc.subject.cinahlEating Disorders--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlPerceptual Distortionen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Collegeen
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