Socialization, Black School-Age Children and the Color Caste Hierarchy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621184
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Other
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Socialization, Black School-Age Children and the Color Caste Hierarchy
Author(s):
Porter, Cornelia Pauline
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Rho Kappa Chapter
Additional Author Information:
Cornelia Pauline Porter, PhD, FAAN
Advisors:
Aamodt, Agnes M.; Atwood, Jan R.; Sorensen, Gladys E.; Verran, Joyce A.; Rosser, Rosemary A.; Bartlett, Neil R.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
1985
Grantor:
University of Arizona
Abstract:

The purpose of the descriptive research was to investigate the relationship between an adherence to the Black community's belief and value system about Black skin tones and Black school-age children's skin tone preferences and perceptions of occupational life opportunities. Six Black skin tones were scaled via Thurstone's method of paired comparisons and the law of comparative judgment. The result was an interval level Skin Tone Scale on which the skin tones were positioned from most to least preferred by the children. The most preferred skin tones ranged from medium to honey brown. The least preferred were the extreme tones of very light yellow and very dark brown. Data collection was accomplished with the Porter Skin Tone Connotation Scale (PSTCS). The instrument was constructed from the forced choice preference paradigm. Data were obtained from a volunteer sample of 98 Black school-age children who resided in a city in Arizona. Data collection and analyses were constructed to test two hypotheses: 1) Black school-age children's skin tone classifications for differential status occupations will be related to gender, age, and perception of own skin tone as indexed by the skin tone values of the Skin Tone Scale, and 2) with increasing age, Black school-age children's skin tone preferences will be more systematically related to the skin tone values of the Skin Tone Scale.

Keywords:
race; value systems; occupational achievement
CINAHL Headings:
Socialization; Socialization--In Infancy and Childhood; Social Class; Skin Pigmentation; Prejudice; Cultural Bias; Skin Pigmentation--Physiology
Sponsors:
American Nurses' Association Ethnic/Racial Minorities Clinical Research Fellowship
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 8522821; ProQuest document ID: 303381559. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-01-10T22:15:24Z
Date of Publication:
2017-01-10

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorAamodt, Agnes M.en
dc.contributor.advisorAtwood, Jan R.en
dc.contributor.advisorSorensen, Gladys E.en
dc.contributor.advisorVerran, Joyce A.en
dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Rosemary A.en
dc.contributor.advisorBartlett, Neil R.en
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Cornelia Paulineen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-10T22:15:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-10T22:15:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621184-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 8522821; ProQuest document ID: 303381559. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>The purpose of the descriptive research was to investigate the relationship between an adherence to the Black community's belief and value system about Black skin tones and Black school-age children's skin tone preferences and perceptions of occupational life opportunities. Six Black skin tones were scaled via Thurstone's method of paired comparisons and the law of comparative judgment. The result was an interval level Skin Tone Scale on which the skin tones were positioned from most to least preferred by the children. The most preferred skin tones ranged from medium to honey brown. The least preferred were the extreme tones of very light yellow and very dark brown. Data collection was accomplished with the Porter Skin Tone Connotation Scale (PSTCS). The instrument was constructed from the forced choice preference paradigm. Data were obtained from a volunteer sample of 98 Black school-age children who resided in a city in Arizona. Data collection and analyses were constructed to test two hypotheses: 1) Black school-age children's skin tone classifications for differential status occupations will be related to gender, age, and perception of own skin tone as indexed by the skin tone values of the Skin Tone Scale, and 2) with increasing age, Black school-age children's skin tone preferences will be more systematically related to the skin tone values of the Skin Tone Scale.</p>en
dc.description.sponsorshipAmerican Nurses' Association Ethnic/Racial Minorities Clinical Research Fellowshipen
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectraceen
dc.subjectvalue systemsen
dc.subjectoccupational achievementen
dc.titleSocialization, Black School-Age Children and the Color Caste Hierarchyen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentRho Kappa Chapteren
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.-
dc.primary-author.detailsCornelia Pauline Porter, PhD, FAANen
thesis.degree.year1985en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlSocializationen
dc.subject.cinahlSocialization--In Infancy and Childhooden
dc.subject.cinahlSocial Classen
dc.subject.cinahlSkin Pigmentationen
dc.subject.cinahlPrejudiceen
dc.subject.cinahlCultural Biasen
dc.subject.cinahlSkin Pigmentation--Physiologyen
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