Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Care

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621187
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Report
Level of Evidence:
Cohort Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Fostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Care
Other Titles:
How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care
Author(s):
Hallowell, Sunny G.; Lake, Eileen, T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Xi
Author Details:
Sunny G. Hallowell, PhD, PPCNP-BC, IBCLC, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Email: sunny.hallowell@villanova.edu, faculty page: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/nursing/facultystaff/faculty/biodetail.html?mail=sunny.hallowell@villanova.edu&xsl=bio_long; Eileen T. Lake, PhD, RN, Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy, Associate Professor of Sociology, and Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, email: Email: elake@nursing.upenn.edu, faculty page: https://www.nursing.upenn.edu/live/profiles/94-eileen-t-lake
Abstract:

Objective:  Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is essential for families, especially mothers to participate in infant care and prepare for transition from hospital to home. Nurses are the principal caregivers in the NICU.  The nurse work environment may influence whether parents spend time with their hospitalized infants.  A national dataset was used to examine the relationship between the work environment and parental presence in the NICU.

Design: Cross-sectional, observational.

Setting: NICU

Participants: A national sample of 104 NICUs, in which 6,060 nurses reported about the 15,233 infants they cared for on their last shift.

Methods: Secondary analysis was used to examine nurse survey data collected in 2008.  The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), was used to measure the work environment across five domains and as a composite measure.  Analysis was conducted using Pearson correlation and bivariate regression models.

Results: On average, 60% of infants’ parents were present during the shift. This ranged from 33% to 79% across units.  The PES-NWI composite score and two domains - Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs and Manager Leadership and Support, were significant predictors of parental presence.  A 1 SD higher score in the composite or either subscale was associated with 2.5% more parents being present.

Conclusion: Parental presence in the NICU is significantly associated with better nurse work environments. A patient-centered culture that facilitates parental presence is enhanced in NICUs that have effective nurse leaders and nurses empowered to participate in hospital governance and decision-making.

Keywords:
Parental Presence; Infant; Intensive care, Neonatal; Nurse staffing; Nurse work environment; Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index
Repository Posting Date:
11-Jan-2017
Date of Publication:
11-Jan-2017
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
Author is the recipient of a Sigma Theta Tau International Small Grant Award 2014.; A published manuscript based on this study and report may be found at Lake, E. T., Hallowell, S. G., Kutney-Lee, A., Hatfield, L. A., Guidice, M. D., Boxer, B. A., & ... Aiken, L. H. (2016). Higher Quality of Care and Patient Safety Associated With Better NICU Work Environments. Journal Of Nursing Care Quality, 31(1), 24-32. doi:10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000146
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeReporten
dc.evidence.levelCohort Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleFostering the Optimal Contribution of Nurses to Parental Engagement in Neonatal Intensive Careen_US
dc.title.alternativeHow Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Careen
dc.contributor.authorHallowell, Sunny G.en
dc.contributor.authorLake, Eileen, T.en
dc.contributor.departmentXien
dc.author.detailsSunny G. Hallowell, PhD, PPCNP-BC, IBCLC, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Email: sunny.hallowell@villanova.edu, faculty page: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/nursing/facultystaff/faculty/biodetail.html?mail=sunny.hallowell@villanova.edu&xsl=bio_long; Eileen T. Lake, PhD, RN, Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy, Associate Professor of Sociology, and Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, email: Email: elake@nursing.upenn.edu, faculty page: https://www.nursing.upenn.edu/live/profiles/94-eileen-t-lakeen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621187-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Objective:</strong>  Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is essential for families, especially mothers to participate in infant care and prepare for transition from hospital to home. Nurses are the principal caregivers in the NICU.  The nurse work environment may influence whether parents spend time with their hospitalized infants.  A national dataset was used to examine the relationship between the work environment and parental presence in the NICU.</p> <p><strong>Design:</strong> Cross-sectional, observational.</p> <p><strong>Setting:</strong> NICU</p> <p><strong>Participants:</strong> A national sample of 104 NICUs, in which 6,060 nurses reported about the 15,233 infants they cared for on their last shift.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong> Secondary analysis was used to examine nurse survey data collected in 2008.  The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI), was used to measure the work environment across five domains and as a composite measure.  Analysis was conducted using Pearson correlation and bivariate regression models.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> On average, 60% of infants’ parents were present during the shift. This ranged from 33% to 79% across units.  The PES-NWI composite score and two domains - Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs and Manager Leadership and Support, were significant predictors of parental presence.  A 1 SD higher score in the composite or either subscale was associated with 2.5% more parents being present.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Parental presence in the NICU is significantly associated with better nurse work environments. A patient-centered culture that facilitates parental presence is enhanced in NICUs that have effective nurse leaders and nurses empowered to participate in hospital governance and decision-making.</p>en
dc.subjectParental Presence; Infanten
dc.subjectIntensive care, Neonatalen
dc.subjectNurse staffingen
dc.subjectNurse work environmenten
dc.subjectPractice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Indexen
dc.date.available2017-01-11T18:57:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-11-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-11T18:57:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.descriptionAuthor is the recipient of a Sigma Theta Tau International Small Grant Award 2014.en
dc.descriptionA published manuscript based on this study and report may be found at Lake, E. T., Hallowell, S. G., Kutney-Lee, A., Hatfield, L. A., Guidice, M. D., Boxer, B. A., & ... Aiken, L. H. (2016). Higher Quality of Care and Patient Safety Associated With Better NICU Work Environments. Journal Of Nursing Care Quality, 31(1), 24-32. doi:10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000146en
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.-
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