12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621218
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Thesis
Level of Evidence:
Meta-Synthesis
Research Approach:
Translational Research/Evidence-based Practice
Title:
Sense of Belonging and Registered Nurse Job Satisfaction
Author(s):
Abel, Sarah
Advisors:
Thomas, Cindy
Degree:
Master’s
Degree Year:
2014
Grantor:
Ball State University
Abstract:

Increased registered nurse turnover may be a significant contributor to the nursing shortage; therefore factors must be acknowledged that lead to poor nurse retention. Tourangeau, Cummings, Cranley, Ferron, and Harvey (2010) identified that a relationship exists between job satisfaction, nurse retention, and nurse turnover. This is a replication of Tourangeau et al.’s (2010) study and will seek to identify additional factors that may influence registered nurse turnover and specifically search to find what work or life situations influenced nurses to remain or end employment. Miles and Huberman’s (1994) deductive qualitative data coding method will be used to categorize, refine, and identify emerging themes along with Krueger’s (1998) focus group analysis research methods.
The findings from this study may provide information to develop strategies that will improve registered nurse retention while increasing job satisfaction.

Keywords:
Nurse Retention; Job Satisfaction
CINAHL Headings:
Personnel Retention; Job Satisfaction; Personnel Turnover; Nursing Shortage; Registered Nurses; Registered Nurses--Psychosocial Factors
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through Cardinal Scholar. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-02-23T21:42:27Z
Date of Publication:
2017-02-23

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Cindyen
dc.contributor.authorAbel, Sarahen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-23T21:42:27Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-23T21:42:27Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-23-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621218-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through Cardinal Scholar. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Increased registered nurse turnover may be a significant contributor to the nursing shortage; therefore factors must be acknowledged that lead to poor nurse retention. Tourangeau, Cummings, Cranley, Ferron, and Harvey (2010) identified that a relationship exists between job satisfaction, nurse retention, and nurse turnover. This is a replication of Tourangeau et al.’s (2010) study and will seek to identify additional factors that may influence registered nurse turnover and specifically search to find what work or life situations influenced nurses to remain or end employment. Miles and Huberman’s (1994) deductive qualitative data coding method will be used to categorize, refine, and identify emerging themes along with Krueger’s (1998) focus group analysis research methods.<br />The findings from this study may provide information to develop strategies that will improve registered nurse retention while increasing job satisfaction.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectNurse Retentionen
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen
dc.titleSense of Belonging and Registered Nurse Job Satisfactionen_US
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorBall State Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMaster’sen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
thesis.degree.year2014en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelMeta-Synthesisen
dc.research.approachTranslational Research/Evidence-based Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlPersonnel Retentionen
dc.subject.cinahlJob Satisfactionen
dc.subject.cinahlPersonnel Turnoveren
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Shortageen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nursesen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nurses--Psychosocial Factorsen
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