Exploring Simulation Utilization and Simulation Evaluation Practices and Approaches in Undergraduate Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621220
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Exploring Simulation Utilization and Simulation Evaluation Practices and Approaches in Undergraduate Nursing Education
Author(s):
Zitzelsberger, Hilde; Coffey, Sue; Graham, Leslie; Papaconstantinou, Efrosini; Anyinam, Charles; Dodd, Greg; Mangal, Jacqueline
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Pi-at-Large
Abstract:

Simulation is becoming one of the most significant teaching-learning strategy available in undergraduate nursing education (Aebersold & Tschannen, 2013; Akhtar-Danesh, Baxter, Valaitis, Stanyon, & Sproul, 2009). Through the development, application, and evaluation of high quality simulation experiences, learners are able to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for safe, competent, and ethical nursing practice. While there is indication within the literature and anecdotally about the benefits of simulation, robust evidence that supports the effectiveness of simulation for learning and evaluation in nursing education has yet to be fully established and is slowly emerging (Alexander et al., 2015; Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, 2015; Hayden, Smiley, Alexander, Kardong-Edgren, & Jeffries, 2014; Rickets, 2011). As the use of simulation increases in nursing education, the need to evaluate students appropriately, accurately, and in reliable ways intensifies (Todd, Manz, Hawkins, Parsons, & Hercinger, 2008). Furthermore, as nursing programs increasingly consider simulation as direct clinical replacement in the context of increased student enrolment and dwindling clinical placements, standardized evaluation must play a vital role (Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, 2007; Norman, 2012; Todd et al., 2008).

Our study investigated simulation utilization and simulation evaluation practices and approaches employed among undergraduate nursing educational programs in Ontario, Canada, using a mixed methods approach, including both quantitative and qualitative data collection through a confidential online survey. The goal of our study is to establish a “picture” of current trends, practices, and approaches related to simulation that is employed within this entire province. An overview of the study results and recommendations that have potential to make a substantial contribution to the growing evidence for best practices in the science of simulation will be discussed.

Keywords:
Simulation; Simulation-based Education; Evaluation; Undergraduate nursing
CINAHL Headings:
Simulations; Education, Nursing; Simulations--Utilization; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Educational Measurement; Outcomes of Education; Outcomes of Education--Evaluation; Education, Clinical
Repository Posting Date:
24-Feb-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Feb-2017
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleExploring Simulation Utilization and Simulation Evaluation Practices and Approaches in Undergraduate Nursing Education-
dc.contributor.authorZitzelsberger, Hildeen
dc.contributor.authorCoffey, Sueen
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Leslieen
dc.contributor.authorPapaconstantinou, Efrosinien
dc.contributor.authorAnyinam, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Gregen
dc.contributor.authorMangal, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Pi-at-Largeen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621220-
dc.description.abstract<p>Simulation is becoming one of the most significant teaching-learning strategy available in undergraduate nursing education (Aebersold & Tschannen, 2013; Akhtar-Danesh, Baxter, Valaitis, Stanyon, & Sproul, 2009). Through the development, application, and evaluation of high quality simulation experiences, learners are able to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for safe, competent, and ethical nursing practice. While there is indication within the literature and anecdotally about the benefits of simulation, robust evidence that supports the effectiveness of simulation for learning and evaluation in nursing education has yet to be fully established and is slowly emerging (Alexander et al., 2015; Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, 2015; Hayden, Smiley, Alexander, Kardong-Edgren, & Jeffries, 2014; Rickets, 2011). As the use of simulation increases in nursing education, the need to evaluate students appropriately, accurately, and in reliable ways intensifies (Todd, Manz, Hawkins, Parsons, & Hercinger, 2008). Furthermore, as nursing programs increasingly consider simulation as direct clinical replacement in the context of increased student enrolment and dwindling clinical placements, standardized evaluation must play a vital role (Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing, 2007; Norman, 2012; Todd et al., 2008).</p> <p>Our study investigated simulation utilization and simulation evaluation practices and approaches employed among undergraduate nursing educational programs in Ontario, Canada, using a mixed methods approach, including both quantitative and qualitative data collection through a confidential online survey. The goal of our study is to establish a “picture” of current trends, practices, and approaches related to simulation that is employed within this entire province. An overview of the study results and recommendations that have potential to make a substantial contribution to the growing evidence for best practices in the science of simulation will be discussed.</p>en
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectSimulation-based Educationen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectUndergraduate nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlSimulationsen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlSimulations--Utilizationen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursing, Baccalaureateen
dc.subject.cinahlEducational Measurementen
dc.subject.cinahlOutcomes of Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlOutcomes of Education--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Clinicalen
dc.date.available2017-02-24T18:25:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-24T18:25:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.-
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