Information Literacy Competencies of Registered Nurses at Magnet Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621225
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Information Literacy Competencies of Registered Nurses at Magnet Hospitals
Author(s):
Belcik, Kimberly Dawn
Additional Author Information:
Kimberly Dawn Belcik, PhD, BSN, BS
Advisors:
Carter, Patricia; Acton, Gayle J.; Becker, Heather; Garcia, Alexandra; Harmon, Glynn
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2011
Grantor:
The University of Texas at Austin
Abstract:

More patients are turning to the Internet as as source of health information. Nurses occupy the frontline of healthcare and must have information literacy (IL) competencies to guide themselves and their patients to the correct and appropriate health  information on the Internet. Within magnet hospitals, which are exemplars for excellent nursing practice, there is an increased emphasis on evidence based practice and research, which requires IL. Exploring IL at magnet hospitals was reasonable considering such competence is promoted. Previous research indicates that nurses lack IL competencies which are necessary to inform their patients and impact healthcare but many studies rely on self-report measures. The purpose of this research study was to objectively measure the information literacy competencies of registered nurses at magnet hospitals, specifically their competencies in accessing and evaluating electronic health information, self-perception of information literacy, reliance on browsing the Internet for health information (versus libraries), and the relationship among these competencies.

A convenient sample of 120 registered nurses, at four magnet hospitals, all components of a single healthcare organization, completed the Research Readiness Self-Assessment—Nurse (RRSA-Nurse), an interactive online instrument and a demographic data form. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, and regression statistical methods. Nurses employed at magnet hospitals had a high ability to access and evaluate health information and high overall IL. Their self-perception in their abilities to access and evaluate health information was high and a majority did not rely on browsing the Internet for health information. Seven variables were significantly correlated to overall information literacy including role, graduate prepared nursing education, ability to access health information, ability to evaluate health information, library and research experience, contact with library staff, and library use. Nurses who were not reliant on browsing the Internet for health information and those with a graduate prepared nursing education had higher information literacy.

Further research is necessary to explore qualities within magnet hospitals that contribute to the promotion of information literacy competencies in nurses. Understanding these qualities may assist with the development of interventions to increase information literacy among practicing nurses.

CINAHL Headings:
Health Information; Information Literacy--Evaluation; Information Literacy; Magnet Hospitals; Registered Nurses; Computer Literacy
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3530282; ProQuest document ID: 1095534594. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree. Author presented on the same topic at STTI's Nursing Research Congress 2011, slides available at http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/155415
Repository Posting Date:
2017-03-01T18:25:44Z
Date of Publication:
2017-03-01

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.advisorActon, Gayle J.en
dc.contributor.advisorBecker, Heatheren
dc.contributor.advisorGarcia, Alexandraen
dc.contributor.advisorHarmon, Glynnen
dc.contributor.authorBelcik, Kimberly Dawnen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-01T18:25:44Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-01T18:25:44Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-01-
dc.identifier.isbn9781267684196-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621225-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3530282; ProQuest document ID: 1095534594. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>More patients are turning to the Internet as as source of health information. Nurses occupy the frontline of healthcare and must have information literacy (IL) competencies to guide themselves and their patients to the correct and appropriate health  information on the Internet. Within magnet hospitals, which are exemplars for excellent nursing practice, there is an increased emphasis on evidence based practice and research, which requires IL. Exploring IL at magnet hospitals was reasonable considering such competence is promoted. Previous research indicates that nurses lack IL competencies which are necessary to inform their patients and impact healthcare but many studies rely on self-report measures. The purpose of this research study was to objectively measure the information literacy competencies of registered nurses at magnet hospitals, specifically their competencies in accessing and evaluating electronic health information, self-perception of information literacy, reliance on browsing the Internet for health information (versus libraries), and the relationship among these competencies.</p> <p>A convenient sample of 120 registered nurses, at four magnet hospitals, all components of a single healthcare organization, completed the Research Readiness Self-Assessment—Nurse (RRSA-Nurse), an interactive online instrument and a demographic data form. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation, and regression statistical methods. Nurses employed at magnet hospitals had a high ability to access and evaluate health information and high overall IL. Their self-perception in their abilities to access and evaluate health information was high and a majority did not rely on browsing the Internet for health information. Seven variables were significantly correlated to overall information literacy including role, graduate prepared nursing education, ability to access health information, ability to evaluate health information, library and research experience, contact with library staff, and library use. Nurses who were not reliant on browsing the Internet for health information and those with a graduate prepared nursing education had higher information literacy.</p> <p>Further research is necessary to explore qualities within magnet hospitals that contribute to the promotion of information literacy competencies in nurses. Understanding these qualities may assist with the development of interventions to increase information literacy among practicing nurses.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInformation Literacy Competencies of Registered Nurses at Magnet Hospitalsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree. Author presented on the same topic at STTI's Nursing Research Congress 2011, slides available at http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/155415en
dc.primary-author.detailsKimberly Dawn Belcik, PhD, BSN, BSen
thesis.degree.year2011en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlHealth Informationen
dc.subject.cinahlInformation Literacy--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlInformation Literacyen
dc.subject.cinahlMagnet Hospitalsen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nursesen
dc.subject.cinahlComputer Literacyen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.