2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621230
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Crucial Conversations in Nursing Academics: Practical Strategies
Other Titles:
Skilled Communications for the Academic Setting
Author(s):
Folgert, April L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Beta
Author Details:
April L. Folgert, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The literature is replete with evidence supporting the presence of incivility, lateral violence, and bullying in nursing (Nikstaitis & Coletta, 2014; Warrner, Sommers, Zappa, and Thernlow, 2016). Most studies have focused on incivility between nurses in the inpatient setting. The prevalence of incivility among nurse academicians has only been recently studied. In 2009, Clark, Farnsworth, and Landrum developed the first known empirical instrument to measure incivility in nursing education, which was revised by Clark, Barbosa-Leiker, Gill, and Nguyen (2015). A qualitative study by Peters (2014) revealed that nursing faculty who had been teaching for five or more years had experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility including sensing that colleagues wanted them to fail, perceived possessiveness from experienced faculty, sensing a power struggle within the department of nursing and feeling that senior faculty felt threatened by novice nursing faculty. Burger, Kramlich, Malitas, Page-Curtrar, and Witfield-Harris (2014) suggest that the bioethical theory symphonology can help faculty facilitate difficult conversations and focus on areas where this is fundamental agreement within the context of nursing education. While research has found incivility to be present between nurses in bedside practice and academics, strategies to address the effectiveness of strategies that decrease incivility need to be studied. Effective communication has consistently been a strategy used across professions to create a healthy work environment (Shanta & Eliason, 2014). Major, Abderrahman, and Sweeney (2013) suggested nurses engage in crucial conversations with co-workers and decrease lateral violence. The framework suggested stems from Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzler (2002) book titled "Crucial Conversations". This presentation will hone in on the assumptions that lead to chaos versus dialogue, the benefits of dialogue in the workplace despite positions of authority, and how to apply practical strategies based on Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzer's (2002) book, "Crucial Conversations", to build and maintain communication in academia. Research on the effectiveness of this strategy in nursing academics is needed. Learning Objectives: Identify assumptions that lead to chaos versus dialogue. Value the benefits of dialogue in the workplace despite varying emotions, opinions, or position of authority. Apply practical strategies based on Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzler's (2002) book, "Crucial Conversations," to build and maintain communication in nursing academia.
Keywords:
dialogue; communication; conversation
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17G05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCrucial Conversations in Nursing Academics: Practical Strategiesen
dc.title.alternativeSkilled Communications for the Academic Settingen
dc.contributor.authorFolgert, April L.en
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Betaen
dc.author.detailsApril L. Folgert, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621230-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The literature is replete with evidence supporting the presence of incivility, lateral violence, and bullying in nursing (Nikstaitis & Coletta, 2014; Warrner, Sommers, Zappa, and Thernlow, 2016). Most studies have focused on incivility between nurses in the inpatient setting. The prevalence of incivility among nurse academicians has only been recently studied. In 2009, Clark, Farnsworth, and Landrum developed the first known empirical instrument to measure incivility in nursing education, which was revised by Clark, Barbosa-Leiker, Gill, and Nguyen (2015). A qualitative study by Peters (2014) revealed that nursing faculty who had been teaching for five or more years had experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility including sensing that colleagues wanted them to fail, perceived possessiveness from experienced faculty, sensing a power struggle within the department of nursing and feeling that senior faculty felt threatened by novice nursing faculty. Burger, Kramlich, Malitas, Page-Curtrar, and Witfield-Harris (2014) suggest that the bioethical theory symphonology can help faculty facilitate difficult conversations and focus on areas where this is fundamental agreement within the context of nursing education. While research has found incivility to be present between nurses in bedside practice and academics, strategies to address the effectiveness of strategies that decrease incivility need to be studied. Effective communication has consistently been a strategy used across professions to create a healthy work environment (Shanta & Eliason, 2014). Major, Abderrahman, and Sweeney (2013) suggested nurses engage in crucial conversations with co-workers and decrease lateral violence. The framework suggested stems from Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzler (2002) book titled "Crucial Conversations". This presentation will hone in on the assumptions that lead to chaos versus dialogue, the benefits of dialogue in the workplace despite positions of authority, and how to apply practical strategies based on Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzer's (2002) book, "Crucial Conversations", to build and maintain communication in academia. Research on the effectiveness of this strategy in nursing academics is needed. Learning Objectives: Identify assumptions that lead to chaos versus dialogue. Value the benefits of dialogue in the workplace despite varying emotions, opinions, or position of authority. Apply practical strategies based on Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzler's (2002) book, "Crucial Conversations," to build and maintain communication in nursing academia.en
dc.subjectdialogueen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectconversationen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:43Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.