2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621250
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Creation of a Serenity Room in an Acute Care Hospital Setting:
Author(s):
Wisotzkey, Susanlee
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Eta
Author Details:
Susanlee Wisotzkey, RN, NE-BC, HNB-BC, CCRN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Nurses face physical, emotional, and mental stress in their daily work. Job-related stress is linked to decreased job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. Researchers describe job-related stress as; burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious traumatization.(1,2, 10) Nurses at a community teaching hospital, through the EBP/nursing research forum, focused on the topic of nurse stress and burnout as a means of addressing job satisfaction, staff morale and patient satisfaction. The group formed the EBP practice forum group in the fall of 2014. The evidenced based practice project was discussed and decided upon. Seventeen nurses in an acute care hospital from varied backgrounds and area of specialty volunteered to appraise the evidence using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice model. The team met on three occasions to discuss the assigned articles and synthesize evidence for recommendations. The PICO question, "What self-care strategies are most effective for increasing job satisfaction/morale of acute care nurses." A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL data bases. The keywords were job satisfaction, morale, nurse, self-care, interventions, stress, stress-reduction, and burn out, compassion fatigue, wellness, and job stress. The initial search yielded sixty articles, of which twenty-six were relevant and reviewed by the team. The evidence appraisal of the twenty-six articles included: no Level I articles, two Level II articles (both with a B rating), five Level III articles (all with a B rating), no Level IV articles and eight Level V articles (all with B rating). Fifteen, of the twenty-six articles, were of good quality evidence; seven were research and eight were non-research article. Consistent findings, through the literature review included; providing education about self-care, stress recognition, effects of stress, use of mindfulness based stress reduction programs and recognizing risk factors contributing to increased stress. The practice recommendations based on the findings; explore resources available within the healthcare system to provide help for nurses coping with job-related stress, moral distress and compassion fatigue/resiliency. Examples listed included; retreats, counseling, education, walk-in wellness clinics offering integrative therapies, meditation, spiritual development, physical activity, grief counseling, peer to peer support and Nurse Manager support of self-care. (5, 14) Identification of strategies to reduced stress and increase in job satisfaction were compiled from the literature. The description of self-care strategies included, but not limited to; educational seminars, mindfulness programs, time off, yoga, regular exercise, nutrition, meal breaks, and improved communication. (5, 14) Institutional resources for nurses to cope with morale distress and compassion fatigue included, but not limited to; retreats, meditation, counseling, education and physical activity. Additional strategies included debriefing colleague support, serenity room and recognition of risk factors. (2, 7, 18, 23) Implementation strategies were reviewed, discussed and based on analysis of feasibility related to financial impact and space constraints. The one strategy, the evidenced based practice group decided to focus on, to decrease stress and promote self-care, was the creation of a serenity room within the acute care hospital setting. This would create a space intended to provide a stress free environment for staff. A quiet haven away from caustic stress factors, such as; negativity, complaining, and blaming behaviors. (4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 15, 21, 24, 25) A tranquil space for self-reflection and recharging resiliency. Following are primary points and potential challenges to creating a serenity room, after the decision to move forward is determined. The team championed the initiative by presenting the information passionately to hospital leadership. The CNO supported and provided the approval to find space. Understanding, space is a premium commodity in a landlocked facility. It took several months of due diligence to find a space that was vacated. The request for the space was taken through the appropriate channels and facility requirements for occupancy. The space was approved April 2015. The next steps involved finding charitable donors for the furnishings, books, music, electronics and necessary renovation. Construction time and talent was donated for the built-in bookcase, but there was a cost for the materials. There was an associated cost with the oversized chair due to the need for it to be reupholstered with hospital grade fabric to meet Department of Health codes. The final cost of completion for everything, furnishings, renovation, books, electronics and a Keurig was under $1000.00, which was funded by the department of nursing. July 2016, the serenity room open for staff use. Data has been and continues to be collected through badge swipe access. Only the numbers of swipes are collected. An aggregate number is compiled each month and graphically shared with Nursing Leadership. The percent of usage is calculated based on fifteen minute intervals, twenty-four hours per day and the number of days in the month. Overall access and use of the serenity room increased from July 2015 through January 2016. Interesting note, the highest access month was January 2016. A study on the effect of holiday stress and the increased need for self-care may be a future area of focus. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe job related stress, describe and explain 3 self-care strategies including the benefits of a serenity room as one of the strategies. The learner will be able to understand and describe the process behind creating a serenity room. References: Aycock, N. & Boyle, D. (2009). Interventions to manage compassion fatigue in oncology nursing, Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12 (2), 183-191. doi: 10.1188/09.CJON.183-191 Boyle, d. A. (2011). Countering compassion fatigue: a requisite nursing agenda. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16 (1), manuscript 2. doi: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol16No01Man02 Cohen-Katz, J., Wiley, S. D., Capuano, T., Baker, D. M., & Shapiro, S. (2005). The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part II. Holistic Nursing Practice, 19 (1), 26-36. Cohen-Katz, J., Wiley, S. D., Capuano, T., Baker, D. M., & Shapiro, S. (2005). The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part III. Holistic Nursing Practice, 19 (2), 78-86. Davies, W.R. (2008). Mindful meditation: Healing burnout in critical care nursing. Holistic Nursing Practice, 22 (1), 32-36 Duncan, A. D., Liechty, J.M., Miller, C., Chinoy, G. & Ricciardi, R. (2011). Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital: Evaluation of a pilot program. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 17 (9), 809-815. doi: 10.1089/acm.2010.0563 Epp, K. (2012). Burnout in critical care nurses: a literature review. Dynamics, 23(4), 25-31. Fetter, K. L. (2012). We grieve too: One inpatient oncology unit's interventions for recognizing and combating compassion fatigue. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 16 (6), 559 - 561. doi: 10.1188/12.CION.559-561 Grafton, E., Gillespie, B. & Henderson S. (2010). Resilience: The power within. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37 (6), 698-704. doi: 10.1188/10.ONF.698-705 Meadors, Pl & Lamson, A. (2007). Compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization: Provider self care on intensive care units for children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22 (1), 24- 34. doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2007.01.006 Meadores, P., Lamson, A. & Sira, N. (2010). Development of an educational module on provider self-care. Journal of Nurses in Staff Development, 26 (4), 152-158, doi:10.1097/NND.0b013e3181b1b9e4 Potter, P., Deshields, T., Berger, J. A., Clarke, M., Olsen, S., & Chen, L. (2013). Evaluation of a compassion fatigue resiliency program for oncology nurses. Oncology Nursing Forum, 40 (2), 180-187. doi: Tabor, P. D. (2011). Vicarious traumatization: Concept analysis. Journal of Forensic Nursing, 7, 203-208. doi: 10.1111/j.1939-3938.2011.01115.x Wilson, M. A., Goettemoeller, D. M., Bevan, N. A., & McCord, J. M. (2013). Moral distress: levels, coping and preferred interventions in critical care and transitional care nurses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22, 1455-1466. doi: 10.1111/jocn.12128 Zadeh, S., Gamba, N., Hudson, C., Wiener, L. (2012). Taking care of care providers: A wellness program for pediatric nurses. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 29, 294-299. doi: 10.1177/1043454212451793 Zeller, J. M. & Levin, P. F. (2013). Mindfulness interventions to reduce stress among nursing personnel: An occupational health perspective. Workplace Health & Safety, 61(2), 85-89.
Keywords:
serenity room; job satisfaction; self-care
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17PST47
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleCreation of a Serenity Room in an Acute Care Hospital Setting:en
dc.contributor.authorWisotzkey, Susanleeen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Etaen
dc.author.detailsSusanlee Wisotzkey, RN, NE-BC, HNB-BC, CCRNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621250-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Nurses face physical, emotional, and mental stress in their daily work. Job-related stress is linked to decreased job satisfaction and patient satisfaction. Researchers describe job-related stress as; burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious traumatization.(1,2, 10) Nurses at a community teaching hospital, through the EBP/nursing research forum, focused on the topic of nurse stress and burnout as a means of addressing job satisfaction, staff morale and patient satisfaction. The group formed the EBP practice forum group in the fall of 2014. The evidenced based practice project was discussed and decided upon. Seventeen nurses in an acute care hospital from varied backgrounds and area of specialty volunteered to appraise the evidence using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice model. The team met on three occasions to discuss the assigned articles and synthesize evidence for recommendations. The PICO question, "What self-care strategies are most effective for increasing job satisfaction/morale of acute care nurses." A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL data bases. The keywords were job satisfaction, morale, nurse, self-care, interventions, stress, stress-reduction, and burn out, compassion fatigue, wellness, and job stress. The initial search yielded sixty articles, of which twenty-six were relevant and reviewed by the team. The evidence appraisal of the twenty-six articles included: no Level I articles, two Level II articles (both with a B rating), five Level III articles (all with a B rating), no Level IV articles and eight Level V articles (all with B rating). Fifteen, of the twenty-six articles, were of good quality evidence; seven were research and eight were non-research article. Consistent findings, through the literature review included; providing education about self-care, stress recognition, effects of stress, use of mindfulness based stress reduction programs and recognizing risk factors contributing to increased stress. The practice recommendations based on the findings; explore resources available within the healthcare system to provide help for nurses coping with job-related stress, moral distress and compassion fatigue/resiliency. Examples listed included; retreats, counseling, education, walk-in wellness clinics offering integrative therapies, meditation, spiritual development, physical activity, grief counseling, peer to peer support and Nurse Manager support of self-care. (5, 14) Identification of strategies to reduced stress and increase in job satisfaction were compiled from the literature. The description of self-care strategies included, but not limited to; educational seminars, mindfulness programs, time off, yoga, regular exercise, nutrition, meal breaks, and improved communication. (5, 14) Institutional resources for nurses to cope with morale distress and compassion fatigue included, but not limited to; retreats, meditation, counseling, education and physical activity. Additional strategies included debriefing colleague support, serenity room and recognition of risk factors. (2, 7, 18, 23) Implementation strategies were reviewed, discussed and based on analysis of feasibility related to financial impact and space constraints. The one strategy, the evidenced based practice group decided to focus on, to decrease stress and promote self-care, was the creation of a serenity room within the acute care hospital setting. This would create a space intended to provide a stress free environment for staff. A quiet haven away from caustic stress factors, such as; negativity, complaining, and blaming behaviors. (4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 15, 21, 24, 25) A tranquil space for self-reflection and recharging resiliency. Following are primary points and potential challenges to creating a serenity room, after the decision to move forward is determined. The team championed the initiative by presenting the information passionately to hospital leadership. The CNO supported and provided the approval to find space. Understanding, space is a premium commodity in a landlocked facility. It took several months of due diligence to find a space that was vacated. The request for the space was taken through the appropriate channels and facility requirements for occupancy. The space was approved April 2015. The next steps involved finding charitable donors for the furnishings, books, music, electronics and necessary renovation. Construction time and talent was donated for the built-in bookcase, but there was a cost for the materials. There was an associated cost with the oversized chair due to the need for it to be reupholstered with hospital grade fabric to meet Department of Health codes. The final cost of completion for everything, furnishings, renovation, books, electronics and a Keurig was under $1000.00, which was funded by the department of nursing. July 2016, the serenity room open for staff use. Data has been and continues to be collected through badge swipe access. Only the numbers of swipes are collected. An aggregate number is compiled each month and graphically shared with Nursing Leadership. The percent of usage is calculated based on fifteen minute intervals, twenty-four hours per day and the number of days in the month. Overall access and use of the serenity room increased from July 2015 through January 2016. Interesting note, the highest access month was January 2016. A study on the effect of holiday stress and the increased need for self-care may be a future area of focus. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe job related stress, describe and explain 3 self-care strategies including the benefits of a serenity room as one of the strategies. The learner will be able to understand and describe the process behind creating a serenity room. References: Aycock, N. & Boyle, D. (2009). Interventions to manage compassion fatigue in oncology nursing, Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12 (2), 183-191. doi: 10.1188/09.CJON.183-191 Boyle, d. A. (2011). Countering compassion fatigue: a requisite nursing agenda. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16 (1), manuscript 2. doi: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol16No01Man02 Cohen-Katz, J., Wiley, S. D., Capuano, T., Baker, D. M., & Shapiro, S. (2005). The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part II. Holistic Nursing Practice, 19 (1), 26-36. Cohen-Katz, J., Wiley, S. D., Capuano, T., Baker, D. M., & Shapiro, S. (2005). The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout, Part III. Holistic Nursing Practice, 19 (2), 78-86. Davies, W.R. (2008). Mindful meditation: Healing burnout in critical care nursing. Holistic Nursing Practice, 22 (1), 32-36 Duncan, A. D., Liechty, J.M., Miller, C., Chinoy, G. & Ricciardi, R. (2011). Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital: Evaluation of a pilot program. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 17 (9), 809-815. doi: 10.1089/acm.2010.0563 Epp, K. (2012). Burnout in critical care nurses: a literature review. Dynamics, 23(4), 25-31. Fetter, K. L. (2012). We grieve too: One inpatient oncology unit's interventions for recognizing and combating compassion fatigue. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 16 (6), 559 - 561. doi: 10.1188/12.CION.559-561 Grafton, E., Gillespie, B. & Henderson S. (2010). Resilience: The power within. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37 (6), 698-704. doi: 10.1188/10.ONF.698-705 Meadors, Pl & Lamson, A. (2007). Compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization: Provider self care on intensive care units for children. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22 (1), 24- 34. doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2007.01.006 Meadores, P., Lamson, A. & Sira, N. (2010). Development of an educational module on provider self-care. Journal of Nurses in Staff Development, 26 (4), 152-158, doi:10.1097/NND.0b013e3181b1b9e4 Potter, P., Deshields, T., Berger, J. A., Clarke, M., Olsen, S., & Chen, L. (2013). Evaluation of a compassion fatigue resiliency program for oncology nurses. Oncology Nursing Forum, 40 (2), 180-187. doi: Tabor, P. D. (2011). Vicarious traumatization: Concept analysis. Journal of Forensic Nursing, 7, 203-208. doi: 10.1111/j.1939-3938.2011.01115.x Wilson, M. A., Goettemoeller, D. M., Bevan, N. A., & McCord, J. M. (2013). Moral distress: levels, coping and preferred interventions in critical care and transitional care nurses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22, 1455-1466. doi: 10.1111/jocn.12128 Zadeh, S., Gamba, N., Hudson, C., Wiener, L. (2012). Taking care of care providers: A wellness program for pediatric nurses. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 29, 294-299. doi: 10.1177/1043454212451793 Zeller, J. M. & Levin, P. F. (2013). Mindfulness interventions to reduce stress among nursing personnel: An occupational health perspective. Workplace Health & Safety, 61(2), 85-89.en
dc.subjectserenity roomen
dc.subjectjob satisfactionen
dc.subjectself-careen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:48Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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