The Relationship Among Change Fatigue, Resilience, and Job Satisfaction of Hospital Staff Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621255
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Among Change Fatigue, Resilience, and Job Satisfaction of Hospital Staff Nurses
Other Titles:
Organizational Change to Promote Healthy Work Environments
Author(s):
Brown, Robin J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi
Author Details:
Robin J. Brown, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Health care is typified by change. Organizational changes have a negative impact on nurses and the effects of organizational change is being overlooked and under researched (Delmatoff & Lazarus, 2014; McMillian & Perron, 2013). Change in an organization leads to increased sick time, work disability, loss of productivity, organizational commitment, increased turnover rates (Bernerth, Walker, & Harris, 2011), stress (McMillian & Perron, 2013), emotional exhaustion (Manzano Garcio & Ayale Calvo, 2012), and change fatigue (Bernerth et al., 2011; McMillan & Perron, 2013). Change fatigue is a result of constant organizational change and has not been researched with nurses. Majority of the research on organizational change is associated with change resistance. Differences exist between change fatigue and change resistance. Resistant behaviors are intentional actions, but change fatigue is when staff become disengaged, apathetic, and passive about the changes. Because of these passive behaviors, change fatigue is unnoticed by nurse managers and under researched (McMillian & Perron, 2013). Resilience is a personal quality that enables one to thrive in the face of adversity, such as with organizational change. Resilient nurses are better able to cope with stress and have lower levels of emotional exhaustion (Manzano Garcia & Ayala Calvo, 2012). Resilience reduces the risk of burnout, improves the retention and mental health of nurses (Shin, Taylor, & Seo, 2012), and has a positive correlation to years of work experience (Lee et al., 2015). A study was conducted to determine if hospital staff nurses experience change fatigue and if there are differences in levels of change fatigue of novice an experienced hospital staff nurses. The Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) was used as the theoretical framework. The model proposes that stressors and ways individuals cope with stress need to be considered jointly in explaining the stress and coping process because they are interdependent. Organizational change is a frequent stressor experienced by nurses that causes stress, a decrease in job satisfaction, and change fatigue. Resilience is personal quality that can be used to adapt to the stress of organizational change. The study assessed the relationship among change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction of hospital staff nurses. Participants completed an online survey, using three tools: Change Fatigue Scale, Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (MMSS). The participants were 535 staff nurses employed in a rural or urban hospital. The study reported a significant difference between novice and experienced staff nurses in change fatigue (t= -2.9, p = .003), resilience (t= -2.3, p = .01), and job satisfaction (t = -2.0, p = .04). Experienced nurses had higher change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction. The study also reported a significant negative association between change fatigue and job satisfaction (r = -.295, p = .000) and change fatigue and resilience (r = -.145, p =.002). A significant positive association was found between resilience and job satisfaction (r = .251, p = .000). Multiple regression found education, gender, and hospital size are predictor variables of change fatigue. Linear trend found as size of facility and number of beds increases, change fatigue increases and as educational level increases, change fatigue decreases. Learning Objectives: The learner will develop an understanding of the relationship among change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction of novice and experienced hospital staff nurses. The learner will identify the differences between change fatigue and change resistance.
Keywords:
change fatigue; organizational change; staff nurses
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17G03
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Relationship Among Change Fatigue, Resilience, and Job Satisfaction of Hospital Staff Nursesen
dc.title.alternativeOrganizational Change to Promote Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Robin J.en
dc.contributor.departmentPhien
dc.author.detailsRobin J. Brown, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621255-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Health care is typified by change. Organizational changes have a negative impact on nurses and the effects of organizational change is being overlooked and under researched (Delmatoff & Lazarus, 2014; McMillian & Perron, 2013). Change in an organization leads to increased sick time, work disability, loss of productivity, organizational commitment, increased turnover rates (Bernerth, Walker, & Harris, 2011), stress (McMillian & Perron, 2013), emotional exhaustion (Manzano Garcio & Ayale Calvo, 2012), and change fatigue (Bernerth et al., 2011; McMillan & Perron, 2013). Change fatigue is a result of constant organizational change and has not been researched with nurses. Majority of the research on organizational change is associated with change resistance. Differences exist between change fatigue and change resistance. Resistant behaviors are intentional actions, but change fatigue is when staff become disengaged, apathetic, and passive about the changes. Because of these passive behaviors, change fatigue is unnoticed by nurse managers and under researched (McMillian & Perron, 2013). Resilience is a personal quality that enables one to thrive in the face of adversity, such as with organizational change. Resilient nurses are better able to cope with stress and have lower levels of emotional exhaustion (Manzano Garcia & Ayala Calvo, 2012). Resilience reduces the risk of burnout, improves the retention and mental health of nurses (Shin, Taylor, & Seo, 2012), and has a positive correlation to years of work experience (Lee et al., 2015). A study was conducted to determine if hospital staff nurses experience change fatigue and if there are differences in levels of change fatigue of novice an experienced hospital staff nurses. The Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) was used as the theoretical framework. The model proposes that stressors and ways individuals cope with stress need to be considered jointly in explaining the stress and coping process because they are interdependent. Organizational change is a frequent stressor experienced by nurses that causes stress, a decrease in job satisfaction, and change fatigue. Resilience is personal quality that can be used to adapt to the stress of organizational change. The study assessed the relationship among change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction of hospital staff nurses. Participants completed an online survey, using three tools: Change Fatigue Scale, Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (MMSS). The participants were 535 staff nurses employed in a rural or urban hospital. The study reported a significant difference between novice and experienced staff nurses in change fatigue (t= -2.9, p = .003), resilience (t= -2.3, p = .01), and job satisfaction (t = -2.0, p = .04). Experienced nurses had higher change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction. The study also reported a significant negative association between change fatigue and job satisfaction (r = -.295, p = .000) and change fatigue and resilience (r = -.145, p =.002). A significant positive association was found between resilience and job satisfaction (r = .251, p = .000). Multiple regression found education, gender, and hospital size are predictor variables of change fatigue. Linear trend found as size of facility and number of beds increases, change fatigue increases and as educational level increases, change fatigue decreases. Learning Objectives: The learner will develop an understanding of the relationship among change fatigue, resilience, and job satisfaction of novice and experienced hospital staff nurses. The learner will identify the differences between change fatigue and change resistance.en
dc.subjectchange fatigueen
dc.subjectorganizational changeen
dc.subjectstaff nursesen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:49Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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