Creating a Healthy Work Environment for Nurses Transitioning from Staff Nurse to Management

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621264
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating a Healthy Work Environment for Nurses Transitioning from Staff Nurse to Management
Author(s):
Buffenbarger, Jennifer Sylvia; Sorrell, Jeanne M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Sylvia Buffenbarger, RN; Jeanne M. Sorrell, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Healthy work environments are essential for recruitment and retention of nurse managers in the United States and internationally. Nurse managers are in key positions to positively influence patient outcomes and costs. In addition, the role of nurses as managers is becoming increasingly important in the retention of staff nurses because of their critical influence on the quality of the work environment (Roche, Duffield, Dimitrelis, & Frew, 2015). There is an expectation that new nurse managers will become competent immediately and meet those same high performance standards as experienced nurse managers (Doria, 2015). Yet many nurses are leaving their manager roles to resume a staff nurse position or to withdraw from the nursing profession completely (Djukic, Jun, Kovner, Brewer, & Fletcher, 2016). In addition, with the nursing shortage predicted to continue, the number of nurses choosing to enter management may decline (Wong, et al., 2013). Research has demonstrated that frequent turnover of nurse managers in a hospital can lead to a disruption of nursing staff performance and negatively impact patient care (Buffenbarger, 2016). This presentation focuses on a qualitative bounded case study that was implemented to explore nurse managers' experiences with turnover in order to identify strategies for enhancing retention. Two conceptual frameworks that guided the study were work empowerment and servant leadership. Research questions focused on nurse managers' perceptions of empowerment and servant leadership characteristics that were important in decisions to assume and remain in a management/leadership role. Data collection included audio-recorded interviews with 7 current or past full-time nurse managers and observation of 3 of the participants at a leadership meeting. Interview transcripts were open coded and thematically analyzed. Observation data were categorized according to empowerment and servant leadership characteristics. Five themes were identified that related to research questions: Struggling to make a difference while pulled in all directions; Opportunity for transformation; Committed but powerless; Embarking unprepared on an unplanned journey; and The presence to serve, to lead others. Findings guided development of a 12-month program for new nurse managers that integrates characteristics of servant leadership reflective of a healthy work environment. Healthy work environments are essential for patient safety and financial viability of an organization (AACN, 2016). Our presentation will address strategies that help to create a healthy work environment to assist novice nurse managers in gaining new skills and self-confidence in their role. By giving voice to the challenges and opportunities embedded in the role of the nurse manager, findings and recommendations from this research can assist both new and experienced nurse managers to work collaboratively to create a healthy work environment. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to identify challenges that staff nurses encounter while transitioning to the new role of nurse manager. The learner will be able to identify characteristics of a healthy work environment that enhance retention for nurse managers.
Keywords:
Nurse manager challenges; Transition; Nurse manager turnover
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17F01
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCreating a Healthy Work Environment for Nurses Transitioning from Staff Nurse to Managementen
dc.contributor.authorBuffenbarger, Jennifer Sylviaen
dc.contributor.authorSorrell, Jeanne M.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJennifer Sylvia Buffenbarger, RN; Jeanne M. Sorrell, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621264-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Healthy work environments are essential for recruitment and retention of nurse managers in the United States and internationally. Nurse managers are in key positions to positively influence patient outcomes and costs. In addition, the role of nurses as managers is becoming increasingly important in the retention of staff nurses because of their critical influence on the quality of the work environment (Roche, Duffield, Dimitrelis, & Frew, 2015). There is an expectation that new nurse managers will become competent immediately and meet those same high performance standards as experienced nurse managers (Doria, 2015). Yet many nurses are leaving their manager roles to resume a staff nurse position or to withdraw from the nursing profession completely (Djukic, Jun, Kovner, Brewer, & Fletcher, 2016). In addition, with the nursing shortage predicted to continue, the number of nurses choosing to enter management may decline (Wong, et al., 2013). Research has demonstrated that frequent turnover of nurse managers in a hospital can lead to a disruption of nursing staff performance and negatively impact patient care (Buffenbarger, 2016). This presentation focuses on a qualitative bounded case study that was implemented to explore nurse managers' experiences with turnover in order to identify strategies for enhancing retention. Two conceptual frameworks that guided the study were work empowerment and servant leadership. Research questions focused on nurse managers' perceptions of empowerment and servant leadership characteristics that were important in decisions to assume and remain in a management/leadership role. Data collection included audio-recorded interviews with 7 current or past full-time nurse managers and observation of 3 of the participants at a leadership meeting. Interview transcripts were open coded and thematically analyzed. Observation data were categorized according to empowerment and servant leadership characteristics. Five themes were identified that related to research questions: Struggling to make a difference while pulled in all directions; Opportunity for transformation; Committed but powerless; Embarking unprepared on an unplanned journey; and The presence to serve, to lead others. Findings guided development of a 12-month program for new nurse managers that integrates characteristics of servant leadership reflective of a healthy work environment. Healthy work environments are essential for patient safety and financial viability of an organization (AACN, 2016). Our presentation will address strategies that help to create a healthy work environment to assist novice nurse managers in gaining new skills and self-confidence in their role. By giving voice to the challenges and opportunities embedded in the role of the nurse manager, findings and recommendations from this research can assist both new and experienced nurse managers to work collaboratively to create a healthy work environment. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to identify challenges that staff nurses encounter while transitioning to the new role of nurse manager. The learner will be able to identify characteristics of a healthy work environment that enhance retention for nurse managers.en
dc.subjectNurse manager challengesen
dc.subjectTransitionen
dc.subjectNurse manager turnoveren
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:50Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:50Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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