Care Zones Staffing Model: Solving Workflow Barriers to Improve Patient and Nurse Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621265
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Care Zones Staffing Model: Solving Workflow Barriers to Improve Patient and Nurse Outcomes
Other Titles:
Staffing Strategies to Improve Outcomes
Author(s):
Kingsley-Mota, William G.; Hill, Barbara J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
William G. Kingsley-Mota, RN, NEA-BC; Barbara J. Hill, APRN, AGCNS-BC, ACCNS-AG, CCRN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: A 24-bed general medicine unit at Emory University Hospital has a history of implementing innovative change. This unit developed Emory Healthcare's model of patient centered, interprofessional collaborative practice (PC-IPCP), and is the original Accountable Care Unit. In spite of that, the unit experienced barriers to achieving patient safety and quality outcomes due to marked inefficiencies in the way assignments were made. Historically, assignments were made by utilizing acuity-related criteria and did not consider the unit geography, thus creating assignment patterns located on the opposite ends of the hallways that produced challenges for patient care, bedside shift report, and participation in multidisciplinary rounds. Nurses also felt their response times to patients' calls were unnecessarily delayed. This was reflected in lower than desired patient satisfaction and higher fall rates. Nurses and patients were frustrated by the inefficiencies of direct communication and the care gaps that the chaotic assignments created. Methods: The new assignment methodology considers unit geography; the AACN Synergy Model principle of matching the skill of nurse to patient needs; nurse participation in daily interprofessional rounds; and a buddy system, to create a strong patient safety net. A schematic flip chart was designed by the Unit Director to guide charge nurses in selecting flexible assignment options which promoted timely planned and unplanned patient care activities. The unit level leadership team took a deliberative approach, piloting one zone assignment at a time, but due to the overwhelmingly positive responses from clinical nurses, the pilot phase was shortened and the model fully implemented within two weeks. Summary: Within six months after implementing the model, falls decreased by 58%, incremental overtime decreased by 60%, patient call light rate dropped by 49%, and the average distance walked by clinical staff decreased by 1.2 miles per day and currently remains sustained. Nurses verbalized increased satisfaction with their ability to meet their patients' quality and safety needs, and both providers and nurses described efficiencies gained in their daily collaborative practice rounds. Patient satisfaction scores remained above average. This project demonstrates application of patient-centered care, teamwork, collaboration, patient safety, and quality care. Learning Objectives: The learner should be able to Identify workflow patterns that interrupt efficient and safe patient centered care. Learners will be able comprehend the workflow process of Care Zones and see how staffing assignments enhances the effectiveness, timeliness, and lessens the workload for healthcare providers. Learners will recognize the impact that the Care Zones Staffing Model has on patient and nurse outcomes.
Keywords:
Safety; Quality; Interprofessional
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17H05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleCare Zones Staffing Model: Solving Workflow Barriers to Improve Patient and Nurse Outcomesen
dc.title.alternativeStaffing Strategies to Improve Outcomesen
dc.contributor.authorKingsley-Mota, William G.en
dc.contributor.authorHill, Barbara J.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsWilliam G. Kingsley-Mota, RN, NEA-BC; Barbara J. Hill, APRN, AGCNS-BC, ACCNS-AG, CCRNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621265-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: A 24-bed general medicine unit at Emory University Hospital has a history of implementing innovative change. This unit developed Emory Healthcare's model of patient centered, interprofessional collaborative practice (PC-IPCP), and is the original Accountable Care Unit. In spite of that, the unit experienced barriers to achieving patient safety and quality outcomes due to marked inefficiencies in the way assignments were made. Historically, assignments were made by utilizing acuity-related criteria and did not consider the unit geography, thus creating assignment patterns located on the opposite ends of the hallways that produced challenges for patient care, bedside shift report, and participation in multidisciplinary rounds. Nurses also felt their response times to patients' calls were unnecessarily delayed. This was reflected in lower than desired patient satisfaction and higher fall rates. Nurses and patients were frustrated by the inefficiencies of direct communication and the care gaps that the chaotic assignments created. Methods: The new assignment methodology considers unit geography; the AACN Synergy Model principle of matching the skill of nurse to patient needs; nurse participation in daily interprofessional rounds; and a buddy system, to create a strong patient safety net. A schematic flip chart was designed by the Unit Director to guide charge nurses in selecting flexible assignment options which promoted timely planned and unplanned patient care activities. The unit level leadership team took a deliberative approach, piloting one zone assignment at a time, but due to the overwhelmingly positive responses from clinical nurses, the pilot phase was shortened and the model fully implemented within two weeks. Summary: Within six months after implementing the model, falls decreased by 58%, incremental overtime decreased by 60%, patient call light rate dropped by 49%, and the average distance walked by clinical staff decreased by 1.2 miles per day and currently remains sustained. Nurses verbalized increased satisfaction with their ability to meet their patients' quality and safety needs, and both providers and nurses described efficiencies gained in their daily collaborative practice rounds. Patient satisfaction scores remained above average. This project demonstrates application of patient-centered care, teamwork, collaboration, patient safety, and quality care. Learning Objectives: The learner should be able to Identify workflow patterns that interrupt efficient and safe patient centered care. Learners will be able comprehend the workflow process of Care Zones and see how staffing assignments enhances the effectiveness, timeliness, and lessens the workload for healthcare providers. Learners will recognize the impact that the Care Zones Staffing Model has on patient and nurse outcomes.en
dc.subjectSafetyen
dc.subjectQualityen
dc.subjectInterprofessionalen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:50Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:50Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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