The Watson Room: Managing Compassion Fatigue in Clinical Nurses on the Front Line

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621267
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Watson Room: Managing Compassion Fatigue in Clinical Nurses on the Front Line
Other Titles:
Managing Workplace Relationships
Author(s):
Crewe, Crystal
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Nu
Author Details:
Crystal Crewe, CMSRN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The concept of compassion fatigue (CF) emerged in the early 1990s in North America to explain a phenomenon observed in nurses employed in emergency departments. A precursor to burnout, CF is a well-known phenomenon associated with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and an inability to work effectively. In nurses, CF has been shown to reduce productivity, increase staff turnover and sick days, and lead to patient dissatisfaction and risks to patient safety. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of a Watson Room designated as a 'quiet zone' with warm colors on the wall, massage chair, and soothing sounds in the workplace environment, reduced CF in clinical nurses at the bedside in acute care settings. The data came from a survey of nurses (n = 19) working in a level 1 trauma center in an acute care setting. This quantitative study was conducted over a two week period. A single-group of nurses completed both a pre and post professional quality of life (ProQol) survey, a 30 item self-measurement of positive and negative aspects of caring. The ProQol operationalizes in three subcategories: compassion satisfaction (10 items), burnout (10 items), and CF (10 items). The ProQOL survey results showed statistically significant differences in the mean scores in all three categories. Paired samples t tests indicate the Watson Room proved to be successful in increasing compassion satisfaction (p = .009), decreasing burnout (p = .002), and decreasing secondary trauma/CF respectively (p = .02). This study shows the importance of nurses taking care of themselves while taking care of others. Understanding CF and devising and implementing interventions to address the subject are important for nurses and patients. Relationship base care of self is very important in our organization. Upper leadership is supportive of managers creating quiet zones from pre-existing spaces to support their staff in care of self, help combat compassion fatigue and burnout. Learning Objectives: Recognize compassion fatigue and burnout signs and symptoms. Create a "quiet zone" known as The Watson Room in a pre-existing space for clinical nurses at the bedside. Develop coping skills to manage compassion fatigue and burnout.
Keywords:
compassion fatigue; intervention; nurses
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17E04
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Watson Room: Managing Compassion Fatigue in Clinical Nurses on the Front Lineen
dc.title.alternativeManaging Workplace Relationshipsen
dc.contributor.authorCrewe, Crystalen
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Nuen
dc.author.detailsCrystal Crewe, CMSRNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621267-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The concept of compassion fatigue (CF) emerged in the early 1990s in North America to explain a phenomenon observed in nurses employed in emergency departments. A precursor to burnout, CF is a well-known phenomenon associated with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and an inability to work effectively. In nurses, CF has been shown to reduce productivity, increase staff turnover and sick days, and lead to patient dissatisfaction and risks to patient safety. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of a Watson Room designated as a 'quiet zone' with warm colors on the wall, massage chair, and soothing sounds in the workplace environment, reduced CF in clinical nurses at the bedside in acute care settings. The data came from a survey of nurses (n = 19) working in a level 1 trauma center in an acute care setting. This quantitative study was conducted over a two week period. A single-group of nurses completed both a pre and post professional quality of life (ProQol) survey, a 30 item self-measurement of positive and negative aspects of caring. The ProQol operationalizes in three subcategories: compassion satisfaction (10 items), burnout (10 items), and CF (10 items). The ProQOL survey results showed statistically significant differences in the mean scores in all three categories. Paired samples t tests indicate the Watson Room proved to be successful in increasing compassion satisfaction (p = .009), decreasing burnout (p = .002), and decreasing secondary trauma/CF respectively (p = .02). This study shows the importance of nurses taking care of themselves while taking care of others. Understanding CF and devising and implementing interventions to address the subject are important for nurses and patients. Relationship base care of self is very important in our organization. Upper leadership is supportive of managers creating quiet zones from pre-existing spaces to support their staff in care of self, help combat compassion fatigue and burnout. Learning Objectives: Recognize compassion fatigue and burnout signs and symptoms. Create a "quiet zone" known as The Watson Room in a pre-existing space for clinical nurses at the bedside. Develop coping skills to manage compassion fatigue and burnout.en
dc.subjectcompassion fatigueen
dc.subjectinterventionen
dc.subjectnursesen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:51Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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