Verbal De-Escalation for Nurse and Health Care Worker Improved Self-Efficacy When Caring for Violent Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621272
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Verbal De-Escalation for Nurse and Health Care Worker Improved Self-Efficacy When Caring for Violent Patients
Other Titles:
Can a Tool Be Used to Improve Work Environments?
Author(s):
Jubb, Julia Mason
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Julia Mason Jubb, RN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, March 17, 2017: Nurses and health care workers are being harmed by violent patients and family members and need to be safe in practice (The Joint Commission, 2010). Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), injuries in health care continue to increase due to assaults on employees by patients or family members (Ison, 2013). The BLS reported that over 11,000 assaults happened to employees at work and 'almost 19% of these assaults occurred in nursing and residential facilities alone' (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 2015, para. 1). The American Nurses Association (2015) has taken a position that nurses should work in a safe and healthy environment. Healthy People 2020 (2015) addresses violence as an objective to be changed and decreased in society and the workplace. Escalation and violence is a problem at the local, state, and federal level. The objective was to help nurses and health care workers stay safe through increased self-efficacy in practice when caring for violent patients and family members. The PICOT question for this doctoral project is 'Will nurses and health care workers in a community based medical-surgical unit, using protocol in a de-escalation program have improved self-efficacy when caring for potentially violent patients and family members compared to nurses/health care workers that do not use the de-escalation program?' The population for this question is nurses and health care workers on a medical-surgical unit in a community-based hospital. The intervention is implementation of a program for nurses and health care workers for de-escalation for potentially violent patients and family members. The comparison in this project is data from incident reports and code-violet debriefing forms that determines incident and levels of violence, in a retrospective study from August 2014 to August 2015. The outcome is improved self-efficacy of nurses and health care workers with a program to deescalate potentially violent patients and family members. Medical-surgical nurses and health care workers attended a staff meeting where this program was introduced. A pre and post-survey was given to the employees in attendance. Based on the comparison between the pre and post survey, employees that attended the educational program showed improved self-efficacy. A verbal de-escalation program has implications in practice to be a valuable tool for increased self-efficacy for all employees within health care. Learning Objective: Describe the impact that violence has in health care and nursing practice today. Recognize ways to verbally de-escalate patients and family members that are violent or potential violent.
Keywords:
safety in nursing; verbal de-escalation; violence in health care
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17A05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Note:
This item was accepted for inclusion in the 2017 Creating Healthy Work Environments, but was not presented at the event.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleVerbal De-Escalation for Nurse and Health Care Worker Improved Self-Efficacy When Caring for Violent Patientsen
dc.title.alternativeCan a Tool Be Used to Improve Work Environments?en
dc.contributor.authorJubb, Julia Masonen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJulia Mason Jubb, RN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621272-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, March 17, 2017: Nurses and health care workers are being harmed by violent patients and family members and need to be safe in practice (The Joint Commission, 2010). Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), injuries in health care continue to increase due to assaults on employees by patients or family members (Ison, 2013). The BLS reported that over 11,000 assaults happened to employees at work and 'almost 19% of these assaults occurred in nursing and residential facilities alone' (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 2015, para. 1). The American Nurses Association (2015) has taken a position that nurses should work in a safe and healthy environment. Healthy People 2020 (2015) addresses violence as an objective to be changed and decreased in society and the workplace. Escalation and violence is a problem at the local, state, and federal level. The objective was to help nurses and health care workers stay safe through increased self-efficacy in practice when caring for violent patients and family members. The PICOT question for this doctoral project is 'Will nurses and health care workers in a community based medical-surgical unit, using protocol in a de-escalation program have improved self-efficacy when caring for potentially violent patients and family members compared to nurses/health care workers that do not use the de-escalation program?' The population for this question is nurses and health care workers on a medical-surgical unit in a community-based hospital. The intervention is implementation of a program for nurses and health care workers for de-escalation for potentially violent patients and family members. The comparison in this project is data from incident reports and code-violet debriefing forms that determines incident and levels of violence, in a retrospective study from August 2014 to August 2015. The outcome is improved self-efficacy of nurses and health care workers with a program to deescalate potentially violent patients and family members. Medical-surgical nurses and health care workers attended a staff meeting where this program was introduced. A pre and post-survey was given to the employees in attendance. Based on the comparison between the pre and post survey, employees that attended the educational program showed improved self-efficacy. A verbal de-escalation program has implications in practice to be a valuable tool for increased self-efficacy for all employees within health care. Learning Objective: Describe the impact that violence has in health care and nursing practice today. Recognize ways to verbally de-escalate patients and family members that are violent or potential violent.en
dc.subjectsafety in nursingen
dc.subjectverbal de-escalationen
dc.subjectviolence in health careen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:51Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.description.noteThis item was accepted for inclusion in the 2017 Creating Healthy Work Environments, but was not presented at the event.-
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