2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621290
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Nursing Barriers to Implementation of Daily Sedation Interruption
Author(s):
Tyndall, Loni E.; Sauer, Penny A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Omega
Author Details:
Loni E. Tyndall; Penny A. Sauer, RN, CCRN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: Mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients often require a continuous infusion of sedation in order to provide safe and effective medical and nursing care. Continuous infusion of benzodiazepines, opioids or propofol are often used to manage ventilated patients (Berry & Zecca, 2012). Over 790,000 patients require mechanical ventilation each year in the United States (Wunsch, Linde-Zwirble, & Angus 2010), many of which often require continuous sedation (Reade, Finfer 2014). The use of continuous infusions can lead to prolonged length of stay in intensive care units (ICU) which increases delirium and muscle wasting, ultimately decreasing patient quality of life (Barr et. al, 2013). Implementing daily interruption of sedation (DIS) in eligible patients is associated with lowering the aforementioned complications from prolonged continuous infusions (Barr et al., 2013). Despite the evidence supporting the use of DIS in mechanically ventilated adults in ICU, a survey of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, only 40% (N=904) reported using DIS (Tanios, de Wit, Epstein, Devlin 2009). Various barriers to DIS included lack of nursing acceptance, concern about patient initiated device removal and respiratory compromise (Tanios, et al 2009) as well as ambiguity about why, who, and how to do daily sedation interruption (Miller, Bosk, Iwashyna, Krein 2012). While previous studies have asked health care professionals about DIS barriers, this study focuses on barriers ICU nurses identify in implementing daily interruption in sedation protocols. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study is to determine factors that influence nurses' decision to implement daily interruption of sedation. Method/Design: A cross sectional descriptive quantitative research design using survey methodology will be used to explore barriers nurses experience to implemented DIS. Institutional Review Board approval will be obtained from the University. Sample: The participants in this study will be a convenient sample of nurses who are currently employed in critical care units and care for patients receiving continuous sedation. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe barriers that nurses in this sample reported in implementing DIS protocols. The learner will be able to discuss potential solutions to implementing best practice protocols.
Keywords:
Barriers to practice; Critical care nursing; Quantitive research
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17PST43
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleNursing Barriers to Implementation of Daily Sedation Interruptionen
dc.contributor.authorTyndall, Loni E.en
dc.contributor.authorSauer, Penny A.en
dc.contributor.departmentNu Omegaen
dc.author.detailsLoni E. Tyndall; Penny A. Sauer, RN, CCRN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621290-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: Mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients often require a continuous infusion of sedation in order to provide safe and effective medical and nursing care. Continuous infusion of benzodiazepines, opioids or propofol are often used to manage ventilated patients (Berry & Zecca, 2012). Over 790,000 patients require mechanical ventilation each year in the United States (Wunsch, Linde-Zwirble, & Angus 2010), many of which often require continuous sedation (Reade, Finfer 2014). The use of continuous infusions can lead to prolonged length of stay in intensive care units (ICU) which increases delirium and muscle wasting, ultimately decreasing patient quality of life (Barr et. al, 2013). Implementing daily interruption of sedation (DIS) in eligible patients is associated with lowering the aforementioned complications from prolonged continuous infusions (Barr et al., 2013). Despite the evidence supporting the use of DIS in mechanically ventilated adults in ICU, a survey of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, only 40% (N=904) reported using DIS (Tanios, de Wit, Epstein, Devlin 2009). Various barriers to DIS included lack of nursing acceptance, concern about patient initiated device removal and respiratory compromise (Tanios, et al 2009) as well as ambiguity about why, who, and how to do daily sedation interruption (Miller, Bosk, Iwashyna, Krein 2012). While previous studies have asked health care professionals about DIS barriers, this study focuses on barriers ICU nurses identify in implementing daily interruption in sedation protocols. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study is to determine factors that influence nurses' decision to implement daily interruption of sedation. Method/Design: A cross sectional descriptive quantitative research design using survey methodology will be used to explore barriers nurses experience to implemented DIS. Institutional Review Board approval will be obtained from the University. Sample: The participants in this study will be a convenient sample of nurses who are currently employed in critical care units and care for patients receiving continuous sedation. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe barriers that nurses in this sample reported in implementing DIS protocols. The learner will be able to discuss potential solutions to implementing best practice protocols.en
dc.subjectBarriers to practiceen
dc.subjectCritical care nursingen
dc.subjectQuantitive researchen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:53Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:53Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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