Bringing Back Field Day: An Innovative Approach to Cultivating Healthy Work Environments

17.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621294
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bringing Back Field Day: An Innovative Approach to Cultivating Healthy Work Environments
Other Titles:
Academia's Role in Creating Healthy Work Environments
Author(s):
Kaylor, Sara K.; Johnson, Paige
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Omega
Author Details:
Sara K. Kaylor, RN, CNE; Paige Johnson, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Friday, March 17, 2017: A positive workplace culture is perhaps one of the most dynamic factors thought to be integral to an organization's success, as it has potential to significantly boost employee commitment, engagement, and job satisfaction (Burchell & Robin, 2011). One aspect that plays into the health of organizational culture is 'social capital,' which refers to the thought that social networking and interpersonal relationships create value and resources for individuals and organizations (DiCicco-Bloom et al., 2007; Read, 2013). Formulated by American education scholar L. J. Hanifan (1916), 'social capital' is defined as 'goodwill, fellowship, mutual sympathy and social intercourse among a group of individuals and families who make up a social unit' (p. 130). He proposed that placing time and attention towards investing in social capital by getting people to socialize and work together made life worthwhile to people in their everyday lives (Hanifan, 1916; Read, 2013). Subsequent classical work on the concept of social capital adds that it has capacity to boost productivity outcomes that may otherwise be unachievable (Coleman, 1988); in nursing, this relates to stronger outcomes for nurses, patients and health care organizations through improved communication, teamwork, staff retention, and patient safety (Read, 2013). If positive working relationships contribute so strongly to thriving, professional environments, perhaps then leaders of change in academia and health care can foster positive, healthy workplace environments through intentional activities directed towards investment in their organization's social capital. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize how the implementation of a 'Faculty-Staff Field Day' event was used as an innovative approach to cultivating a healthy academic-based work environment. A brief discussion on the planning, implementation, and feedback evaluation of the Field Day event will be offered, as well as 'tried-and-true' recommendations for future implementation. Specific activities used for this event will also be shared, as they were intentionally planned to promote physical activity, an increased sense of community, and enhanced collegial relationships among faculty and staff participants. Learning Objectives: Distinguish how a Field Day event can be used to cultivate a healthy workplace environment. Integrate 'tried-and-true' recommendations with the planning, implementation, and evaluation considerations of a Field Day event. Create specific activities that may be used to promote physical activity, an increased sense of community, and enhanced collegial relationships among participants of a Field Day event.
Keywords:
Innovative Strategies; Positive Working Relationships; Academia
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17A01
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleBringing Back Field Day: An Innovative Approach to Cultivating Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.title.alternativeAcademia's Role in Creating Healthy Work Environmentsen
dc.contributor.authorKaylor, Sara K.en
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Paigeen
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Omegaen
dc.author.detailsSara K. Kaylor, RN, CNE; Paige Johnson, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621294-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Friday, March 17, 2017: A positive workplace culture is perhaps one of the most dynamic factors thought to be integral to an organization's success, as it has potential to significantly boost employee commitment, engagement, and job satisfaction (Burchell & Robin, 2011). One aspect that plays into the health of organizational culture is 'social capital,' which refers to the thought that social networking and interpersonal relationships create value and resources for individuals and organizations (DiCicco-Bloom et al., 2007; Read, 2013). Formulated by American education scholar L. J. Hanifan (1916), 'social capital' is defined as 'goodwill, fellowship, mutual sympathy and social intercourse among a group of individuals and families who make up a social unit' (p. 130). He proposed that placing time and attention towards investing in social capital by getting people to socialize and work together made life worthwhile to people in their everyday lives (Hanifan, 1916; Read, 2013). Subsequent classical work on the concept of social capital adds that it has capacity to boost productivity outcomes that may otherwise be unachievable (Coleman, 1988); in nursing, this relates to stronger outcomes for nurses, patients and health care organizations through improved communication, teamwork, staff retention, and patient safety (Read, 2013). If positive working relationships contribute so strongly to thriving, professional environments, perhaps then leaders of change in academia and health care can foster positive, healthy workplace environments through intentional activities directed towards investment in their organization's social capital. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize how the implementation of a 'Faculty-Staff Field Day' event was used as an innovative approach to cultivating a healthy academic-based work environment. A brief discussion on the planning, implementation, and feedback evaluation of the Field Day event will be offered, as well as 'tried-and-true' recommendations for future implementation. Specific activities used for this event will also be shared, as they were intentionally planned to promote physical activity, an increased sense of community, and enhanced collegial relationships among faculty and staff participants. Learning Objectives: Distinguish how a Field Day event can be used to cultivate a healthy workplace environment. Integrate 'tried-and-true' recommendations with the planning, implementation, and evaluation considerations of a Field Day event. Create specific activities that may be used to promote physical activity, an increased sense of community, and enhanced collegial relationships among participants of a Field Day event.en
dc.subjectInnovative Strategiesen
dc.subjectPositive Working Relationshipsen
dc.subjectAcademiaen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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