The Effect of Leadership and Staffing Adequacy on Nurse Coworker Incivility in Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621296
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Leadership and Staffing Adequacy on Nurse Coworker Incivility in Hospitals
Other Titles:
Nursing Incivility Interventions
Author(s):
Smith, Jessica G.; Morin, Karen H.; Lake, Eileen T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Nu
Author Details:
Jessica G. Smith, RN; Karen H. Morin, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN; Eileen T. Lake, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Objective: To determine whether nurse co-worker incivility is associated with modifiable features of the hospital nurse work environment, namely nurse staffing adequacy and nurse manager effectiveness. Background: Favorable nurse staffing and nurse work environments have been linked to better patient and nurse outcomes in multiple large studies using sophisticated quantitative methods (Aiken et al, 2011; Aiken et al, 2014; McHugh et al, 2016; McHugh & Ma, 2014). However, nurse coworker incivility has not previously been studied as an outcome of modifiable features of nurse work environments. Methods: Donabedian's (1980) structure-process-outcomes conceptual framework was the theoretical basis for this study. Hospital staff registered nurses at 5 hospitals, 3 of which were Magnet recognized, were surveyed. A cross-sectional, correlational design was employed. Linear regression models were estimated to explain the variance in coworker incivility explained by manager effectiveness and staffing adequacy. Results: The final analytic sample was N = 212 after data cleaning and multiple imputation. Half of the sample were 35 years of age and under. Most participants (76%) held a bachelor degree in nursing. More positive reports of nurse manager leadership were inversely correlated with lesser scores for coworker incivility (b = -.55). More positive reports of nurse staffing and resource adequacy were correlated with lower scores for coworker incivility (b= -.45). In separate linear regression models, reports of nurse manager leadership predicted 15% of the explained variance in coworker incivility (R2 = .15, p < .01) and reports of nurse staffing adequacy predicted 7.7% of coworker incivility. In a joint regression model, perceptions of nurse manager leadership were inversely correlated (b = -.47) with coworker incivility, while nurse staffing exhibited a weaker but significant effect (b= -.19). All regression results remained stable even while controlling for the nurse's age, years of experience, and educational level. Conclusions: Inadequate nurse staffing and ineffective nurse manager leadership undermine civility among nurse coworkers. Measures should be taken to monitor, evaluate, and address nurse manager leadership deficits and nurse staffing and resources as part of an effort to reduce coworker incivility among registered nurses. Evidence-based strategies to improve nurse manager leadership skills are needed and research efforts should address this topic. Learning Objectives: Understand and describe the associations among nurse manager leadership, nurse staffing adequacy, and coworker incivility. Consider the importance of developing interventions to improve nurse manager abilities and improve nurse staffing adequacy. Identify opportunities for further research on the nurse work environment.
Keywords:
nurse work environment; nurse leadership; nurse staffing
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17G02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleThe Effect of Leadership and Staffing Adequacy on Nurse Coworker Incivility in Hospitalsen
dc.title.alternativeNursing Incivility Interventionsen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jessica G.en
dc.contributor.authorMorin, Karen H.en
dc.contributor.authorLake, Eileen T.en
dc.contributor.departmentEta Nuen
dc.author.detailsJessica G. Smith, RN; Karen H. Morin, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN; Eileen T. Lake, RN, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621296-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Objective: To determine whether nurse co-worker incivility is associated with modifiable features of the hospital nurse work environment, namely nurse staffing adequacy and nurse manager effectiveness. Background: Favorable nurse staffing and nurse work environments have been linked to better patient and nurse outcomes in multiple large studies using sophisticated quantitative methods (Aiken et al, 2011; Aiken et al, 2014; McHugh et al, 2016; McHugh & Ma, 2014). However, nurse coworker incivility has not previously been studied as an outcome of modifiable features of nurse work environments. Methods: Donabedian's (1980) structure-process-outcomes conceptual framework was the theoretical basis for this study. Hospital staff registered nurses at 5 hospitals, 3 of which were Magnet recognized, were surveyed. A cross-sectional, correlational design was employed. Linear regression models were estimated to explain the variance in coworker incivility explained by manager effectiveness and staffing adequacy. Results: The final analytic sample was N = 212 after data cleaning and multiple imputation. Half of the sample were 35 years of age and under. Most participants (76%) held a bachelor degree in nursing. More positive reports of nurse manager leadership were inversely correlated with lesser scores for coworker incivility (b = -.55). More positive reports of nurse staffing and resource adequacy were correlated with lower scores for coworker incivility (b= -.45). In separate linear regression models, reports of nurse manager leadership predicted 15% of the explained variance in coworker incivility (R2 = .15, p < .01) and reports of nurse staffing adequacy predicted 7.7% of coworker incivility. In a joint regression model, perceptions of nurse manager leadership were inversely correlated (b = -.47) with coworker incivility, while nurse staffing exhibited a weaker but significant effect (b= -.19). All regression results remained stable even while controlling for the nurse's age, years of experience, and educational level. Conclusions: Inadequate nurse staffing and ineffective nurse manager leadership undermine civility among nurse coworkers. Measures should be taken to monitor, evaluate, and address nurse manager leadership deficits and nurse staffing and resources as part of an effort to reduce coworker incivility among registered nurses. Evidence-based strategies to improve nurse manager leadership skills are needed and research efforts should address this topic. Learning Objectives: Understand and describe the associations among nurse manager leadership, nurse staffing adequacy, and coworker incivility. Consider the importance of developing interventions to improve nurse manager abilities and improve nurse staffing adequacy. Identify opportunities for further research on the nurse work environment.en
dc.subjectnurse work environmenten
dc.subjectnurse leadershipen
dc.subjectnurse staffingen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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