Confronting Nursing Incivility: Educational Intervention for Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621297
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Confronting Nursing Incivility: Educational Intervention for Change
Other Titles:
Nursing Incivility Interventions
Author(s):
French, Sharon Kay; Cuellar, Ernestine
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Delta
Author Details:
Sharon Kay French, RN; Ernestine Cuellar, RN, PMHCNS-BC
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: It is essential for nurses and nursing faculty to increase and implement interventions that decrease incivility within the nursing profession. Incivility is known by a variety of terms, such as workplace and lateral violence, abuse, and bullying, that are all detrimental to nursing (Clark, 2008). Workplace incivility continues to occur at an estimated astronomical cost of $24 billion annually in the U.S and severely impacts professional nursing practice, patient care, and nurses' health and well-being (Andersson, 1999). A key component contributing to and motivating the development of educational strategies is the identification and articulation of learning outcomes. Learning outcomes by the end of this session include the participants' ability 1) to identify and define workplace incivility as well as 2) to recognize and apply that knowledge when encountering discourteous, insolent, and bullying behaviors in both academic and clinical settings. Additionally, 3) participants willdiscuss the benefits of teamwork and describe strategies for creating positive behavior. Specific objectives related to the purpose of the learning activities will enable participants to apply knowledge for addressing incivility in any environment. The purpose of this presentation is to examine strategies and interventions for confronting incivility. Topics include an incivility overview discussing causes, consequences, prevention through early detection, and the overall impact to the nursing profession. Educational strategies include communication skills and recommendations for nurses to confront and report uncivil behaviors (Clark, 2009). The discussion addresses conflict resolution, negotiation, assertiveness, personal accountability, patient safety, teamwork, and collaboration. Audience participation will enhance the learning environment. In the past few years efforts to address the problem have focused on identifying and defining perpetrators and behaviors that characterize incivility as well providing recommendations for improvement. The Joint Commission zero-tolerance policy and codes of conduct are steps in the right direction that require nursing commitment, promotion, and the enforcement of meaningful evidenced-based interventional solutions (Hoffman & Chunta, 2015). The American Nurses Association also strongly advocates addressing this serious problem among nurses and healthcare workers. Nurses are aware of the issues however there needs to be widespread educational opportunities offered to ensure that nursing faculty and clinicians implement these interventions. One recommendation is that educational interventions become part of the National Council of the States Board of Nursing continuing educational requirements as well as a component of nursing student education. Although incivility is most common against nursing students, new graduate nurses are the most vulnerable to abusive behavior and leave their jobs within the first two years of employment (D'ambra,& Andrews, 2014). Several studies concluded that faculty could play a pivotal role in examining how students are socialized into the nursing profession by providing the appropriate training and coping skills within the nursing curriculum (Altmiller, 2012). The time has come for nursing educational leadership to confront incivility by changing the status quo with meaningful educational interventions thus preserving the ethical and moral fabric that exemplifies the nursing profession. Through the adoption of skills such as conflict resolution, problem solving, personal accountability, and respectful communication the participant recognizes positive behavior and addresses negative actions. Ultimately, the participant will be able to employ the benefits of teamwork and positive behavior as part of the solution to incivility. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe strategies that create a civil environment in both the clinical and academic settings. The learner will be able to discuss the benefits of teamwork and describe strategies and interventions for creating positive behavior.
Keywords:
Incivility; Interventions; Educational
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17G02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleConfronting Nursing Incivility: Educational Intervention for Changeen
dc.title.alternativeNursing Incivility Interventionsen
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Sharon Kayen
dc.contributor.authorCuellar, Ernestineen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Deltaen
dc.author.detailsSharon Kay French, RN; Ernestine Cuellar, RN, PMHCNS-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621297-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: It is essential for nurses and nursing faculty to increase and implement interventions that decrease incivility within the nursing profession. Incivility is known by a variety of terms, such as workplace and lateral violence, abuse, and bullying, that are all detrimental to nursing (Clark, 2008). Workplace incivility continues to occur at an estimated astronomical cost of $24 billion annually in the U.S and severely impacts professional nursing practice, patient care, and nurses' health and well-being (Andersson, 1999). A key component contributing to and motivating the development of educational strategies is the identification and articulation of learning outcomes. Learning outcomes by the end of this session include the participants' ability 1) to identify and define workplace incivility as well as 2) to recognize and apply that knowledge when encountering discourteous, insolent, and bullying behaviors in both academic and clinical settings. Additionally, 3) participants willdiscuss the benefits of teamwork and describe strategies for creating positive behavior. Specific objectives related to the purpose of the learning activities will enable participants to apply knowledge for addressing incivility in any environment. The purpose of this presentation is to examine strategies and interventions for confronting incivility. Topics include an incivility overview discussing causes, consequences, prevention through early detection, and the overall impact to the nursing profession. Educational strategies include communication skills and recommendations for nurses to confront and report uncivil behaviors (Clark, 2009). The discussion addresses conflict resolution, negotiation, assertiveness, personal accountability, patient safety, teamwork, and collaboration. Audience participation will enhance the learning environment. In the past few years efforts to address the problem have focused on identifying and defining perpetrators and behaviors that characterize incivility as well providing recommendations for improvement. The Joint Commission zero-tolerance policy and codes of conduct are steps in the right direction that require nursing commitment, promotion, and the enforcement of meaningful evidenced-based interventional solutions (Hoffman & Chunta, 2015). The American Nurses Association also strongly advocates addressing this serious problem among nurses and healthcare workers. Nurses are aware of the issues however there needs to be widespread educational opportunities offered to ensure that nursing faculty and clinicians implement these interventions. One recommendation is that educational interventions become part of the National Council of the States Board of Nursing continuing educational requirements as well as a component of nursing student education. Although incivility is most common against nursing students, new graduate nurses are the most vulnerable to abusive behavior and leave their jobs within the first two years of employment (D'ambra,& Andrews, 2014). Several studies concluded that faculty could play a pivotal role in examining how students are socialized into the nursing profession by providing the appropriate training and coping skills within the nursing curriculum (Altmiller, 2012). The time has come for nursing educational leadership to confront incivility by changing the status quo with meaningful educational interventions thus preserving the ethical and moral fabric that exemplifies the nursing profession. Through the adoption of skills such as conflict resolution, problem solving, personal accountability, and respectful communication the participant recognizes positive behavior and addresses negative actions. Ultimately, the participant will be able to employ the benefits of teamwork and positive behavior as part of the solution to incivility. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to describe strategies that create a civil environment in both the clinical and academic settings. The learner will be able to discuss the benefits of teamwork and describe strategies and interventions for creating positive behavior.en
dc.subjectIncivilityen
dc.subjectInterventionsen
dc.subjectEducationalen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.