Identifying Japanese Staff Nurses' Perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in Hospitals; Creating a Positive and Agreeable Workplace

14.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621309
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
Identifying Japanese Staff Nurses' Perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in Hospitals; Creating a Positive and Agreeable Workplace
Author(s):
Kashima, Kasane; Funashima, Naomi; Nakayama, Toshiko
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kasane Kashima, RN; Naomi Funashima, RN; Toshiko Nakayama, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The concept of 'Hatarakinikusa' is a Japanese concept familiar to one's life at work and expressing one's negative or disagreeable perceptions about situations or other factors in one's workplace which prevent it from being a good place to work. Background: Nurses' positive work environments enhance not only their satisfaction but also improve patient safety and quality of care. Although a large number of studies aimed at creating a positive work environment for nurses exist, no study has comprehensively identified all aspects of 'Hatarakinikusa', even though they reflect Japanese nurses' perceptions of the work environment directly. Furthermore, many related studies have been done from the organizational point of view. However, individual nurses' autonomous contributions are also very important to reduce 'Hatarakinikusa' to improve the work environment. To promote these contributions of individuals, it is necessary to understand nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa'. Aim: The purpose of this article is to identify staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' in hospitals using a qualitative and inductive approach, and to discuss how individual nurses reduce 'Hatarakinikusa' to make their workplaces a good place to work. Method: A questionnaire asking for nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' in their workplace was created. Content validity of the questionnaire was established by conducting two pilot studies. Content analysis for nursing education based on Berelson's methodology was applied. This study was conducted as part of a larger study. Result: Four hundred and forty-five nurses returned (return rate 55.8%) and 352 valid responses were analyzed. Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' included; 1) the presence of personnel whose characteristics are not desirable for collaboration, 2) poor level of establishment of a collaboration system, 3) absence of personnel who willingly respond to requests to communicate about work situations, 4) negative responses to requests to exercise one's occupational rights, 5) demands for attendance at activities which encroach upon one's private life and 6) compulsory work-related study regardless of necessity or one's willingness. Discussion: This study found that 'Hatarakinikusa' includes 1), 3), and 4), which could be improved by ones' own efforts. These categories are useful as objective points of view for reflection on one's attitude toward others. This study also found that 'Hatarakinikusa' includes some aspects such as 4), 5), and 6), which have not been paid much attention in other countries. However, these are important for Japanese nurses. Decreasing 'Hatarakinikusa' make it easier for nurses to continuing nursing. Conclusion: Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' were identified. It was suggested that not only organizational but also individual contributions are very important in improving nursing work environments and that by decreasing 'Hatarakinikusa', quality of care could be improved as a result of nurses remaining in their jobs for a longer time and developing their careers. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to understand Japanese nurses' perception of 'Hatarakinikusa', which reflect their perceptions of the work environment directly. The learner will be able to discuss how individual nurses contribute to improve the work environment.
Keywords:
hospitals in Japan; staff nurses' perceptions; work environments
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17PST19
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleIdentifying Japanese Staff Nurses' Perceptions of "Hatarakinikusa" in Hospitals; Creating a Positive and Agreeable Workplaceen
dc.contributor.authorKashima, Kasaneen
dc.contributor.authorFunashima, Naomien
dc.contributor.authorNakayama, Toshikoen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsKasane Kashima, RN; Naomi Funashima, RN; Toshiko Nakayama, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621309-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: The concept of 'Hatarakinikusa' is a Japanese concept familiar to one's life at work and expressing one's negative or disagreeable perceptions about situations or other factors in one's workplace which prevent it from being a good place to work. Background: Nurses' positive work environments enhance not only their satisfaction but also improve patient safety and quality of care. Although a large number of studies aimed at creating a positive work environment for nurses exist, no study has comprehensively identified all aspects of 'Hatarakinikusa', even though they reflect Japanese nurses' perceptions of the work environment directly. Furthermore, many related studies have been done from the organizational point of view. However, individual nurses' autonomous contributions are also very important to reduce 'Hatarakinikusa' to improve the work environment. To promote these contributions of individuals, it is necessary to understand nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa'. Aim: The purpose of this article is to identify staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' in hospitals using a qualitative and inductive approach, and to discuss how individual nurses reduce 'Hatarakinikusa' to make their workplaces a good place to work. Method: A questionnaire asking for nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' in their workplace was created. Content validity of the questionnaire was established by conducting two pilot studies. Content analysis for nursing education based on Berelson's methodology was applied. This study was conducted as part of a larger study. Result: Four hundred and forty-five nurses returned (return rate 55.8%) and 352 valid responses were analyzed. Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' included; 1) the presence of personnel whose characteristics are not desirable for collaboration, 2) poor level of establishment of a collaboration system, 3) absence of personnel who willingly respond to requests to communicate about work situations, 4) negative responses to requests to exercise one's occupational rights, 5) demands for attendance at activities which encroach upon one's private life and 6) compulsory work-related study regardless of necessity or one's willingness. Discussion: This study found that 'Hatarakinikusa' includes 1), 3), and 4), which could be improved by ones' own efforts. These categories are useful as objective points of view for reflection on one's attitude toward others. This study also found that 'Hatarakinikusa' includes some aspects such as 4), 5), and 6), which have not been paid much attention in other countries. However, these are important for Japanese nurses. Decreasing 'Hatarakinikusa' make it easier for nurses to continuing nursing. Conclusion: Thirty-seven categories expressing staff nurses' perceptions of 'Hatarakinikusa' were identified. It was suggested that not only organizational but also individual contributions are very important in improving nursing work environments and that by decreasing 'Hatarakinikusa', quality of care could be improved as a result of nurses remaining in their jobs for a longer time and developing their careers. Learning Objectives: The learner will be able to understand Japanese nurses' perception of 'Hatarakinikusa', which reflect their perceptions of the work environment directly. The learner will be able to discuss how individual nurses contribute to improve the work environment.en
dc.subjecthospitals in Japanen
dc.subjectstaff nurses' perceptionsen
dc.subjectwork environmentsen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:55Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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