2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621316
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Title:
ICU Healthy Work Environments: A Concept Analysis
Author(s):
Little-Stoetzel, Sharon A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Eta
Author Details:
Sharon A. Little-Stoetzel, RN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: Nurses' healthy work environments are defined inconsistently in the nursing literature. Clarifying the concept of a healthy work environment would benefit employees, patients, leaders, and organizations as well as provide an empirical definition for future research. Objective: The purpose of this research was to develop an empirically based definition of a healthy work environment in the intensive care unit using Rodgers' and Knafl's (2000) evolutionary concept analysis method. Methods: This evolutionary concept analysis method included data collection and analysis in two phases. Phase 1 data collection and analysis included a random sample of 20% of the literature, as recommended by Rodgers and Knafl, published between 2008 and 2012 from the sociology, psychology, nursing, and business databases regarding healthy work environments. Phase 2 data collection included interviews with 11 ICU staff nurses and 10 ICU nurse managers using an interview guide developed from the themes that emerged from the literature sample. Results: An empirically based definition of an ICU healthy work environment was developed: a healthy work environment in ICU is one that is individually perceived to include positive work-group relationships and effective teamwork and that supports a nurse holistically by nurturing his or her physical, psychosocial, professional, and spiritual components of health. Antecedent themes included: adequate staff and supplies, effective leadership, participation in decision-making and professional standards. Consequence themes included: quality product/outcome, organizational sustainability, and decreased turnover. Themes from the interviews were framed with AACN's standards of a healthy work environment and Watson's Human Caring Theory. Conclusions/Recommendations: As a result of the study, recommendations for leaders include to work toward creating and supporting an environment where ICU staff nurses have positive work-group relationships and effective teamwork. Researchers at the AACN (2005) noted true collaboration among all members of the team requires 'constant attention and nurturing' (p. 21) by leadership. Nurse leaders must ensure formal processes and structures are in place that facilitate effective teamwork, including unit council structures and effective communication avenues. As suggested in the study, healthy intensive care work environments should also provide physical, psychosocial, professional, and spiritual support for nurses. Learning Objectives: Describe the evolutionary model for concept analysis. Define the concept of an ICU Healthy Word Environment. Describe the attributes of a healthy work environment.
Keywords:
Healthy work envrionments; Evolutionary Concept Analysis; Intensive Care Units
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17PST23
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.titleICU Healthy Work Environments: A Concept Analysisen
dc.contributor.authorLittle-Stoetzel, Sharon A.en
dc.contributor.departmentPi Etaen
dc.author.detailsSharon A. Little-Stoetzel, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621316-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Background: Nurses' healthy work environments are defined inconsistently in the nursing literature. Clarifying the concept of a healthy work environment would benefit employees, patients, leaders, and organizations as well as provide an empirical definition for future research. Objective: The purpose of this research was to develop an empirically based definition of a healthy work environment in the intensive care unit using Rodgers' and Knafl's (2000) evolutionary concept analysis method. Methods: This evolutionary concept analysis method included data collection and analysis in two phases. Phase 1 data collection and analysis included a random sample of 20% of the literature, as recommended by Rodgers and Knafl, published between 2008 and 2012 from the sociology, psychology, nursing, and business databases regarding healthy work environments. Phase 2 data collection included interviews with 11 ICU staff nurses and 10 ICU nurse managers using an interview guide developed from the themes that emerged from the literature sample. Results: An empirically based definition of an ICU healthy work environment was developed: a healthy work environment in ICU is one that is individually perceived to include positive work-group relationships and effective teamwork and that supports a nurse holistically by nurturing his or her physical, psychosocial, professional, and spiritual components of health. Antecedent themes included: adequate staff and supplies, effective leadership, participation in decision-making and professional standards. Consequence themes included: quality product/outcome, organizational sustainability, and decreased turnover. Themes from the interviews were framed with AACN's standards of a healthy work environment and Watson's Human Caring Theory. Conclusions/Recommendations: As a result of the study, recommendations for leaders include to work toward creating and supporting an environment where ICU staff nurses have positive work-group relationships and effective teamwork. Researchers at the AACN (2005) noted true collaboration among all members of the team requires 'constant attention and nurturing' (p. 21) by leadership. Nurse leaders must ensure formal processes and structures are in place that facilitate effective teamwork, including unit council structures and effective communication avenues. As suggested in the study, healthy intensive care work environments should also provide physical, psychosocial, professional, and spiritual support for nurses. Learning Objectives: Describe the evolutionary model for concept analysis. Define the concept of an ICU Healthy Word Environment. Describe the attributes of a healthy work environment.en
dc.subjectHealthy work envrionmentsen
dc.subjectEvolutionary Concept Analysisen
dc.subjectIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:56Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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