2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621318
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Responding When Incivility Arises in the Workplace
Other Titles:
Responses to Workplace Bullying
Author(s):
Kennison, Monica; Dzurec, Laura C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Omicron Mu
Author Details:
Monica Kennison, RN; Laura C. Dzurec, RN, PMHCNS-BC, ANEF, FAAN
Abstract:
Session presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Almost a decade has passed since the Joint Commission issued a Sentinel Alert linking intimidating behaviors to medical errors, patient dissatisfaction, and adverse outcomes. More recent studies confirm that workplace acts of incivility, progressing to bullying and even physical abuse in some cases, continue to significantly undermine the culture of safety that facilitates effective healthcare practice. While professional comportment policies pay lip service to what 'should occur' in instances of intimidation and bullying, the inherent, complex and subtle contextual elements of those acts present challenges that supersede the benefits of legislated, cookie cutter approaches to their management. As a result, nurses, whether in practice or educational settings, may find themselves ill-supported as they try to navigate the choppy waters of workplace incivility, even when administrators claim to have established guidelines for addressing it. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies aimed to directly support individual responses to acts of workplace incivility and bullying. The investigators used pragmatic utility to synthesize findings from published studies addressing workplace bullying. The work resulted in new insights and guidance to advance understanding of the target-to-victim cascade that occurs for many who are confronted by the confusing assaults of bullies. Moreover, findings speak to the variance of personal responses to workplace bullying and to the significance of organization-wide commitment to establishing a just culture. Promoting civility and stemming workplace bullying has implications for nurses in all settings. Role modeling professional comportment and implementing policies that recognize the unique responses of individuals who are victimized by their bully counterparts are essential components of supportive work environments and consistent practice for acceptable behavior. However, these skills do not just happen with exposure and it behooves nurses to add to their personal repertoires these highly specialized interpersonal skills. Continued allegiance to organizational policies that support narrow definitions of incivility and that recognize only highly visible workplace bullying affronts will not promote workplaces that are safe and healthy, nor will they support the individuals who work within them. This presentation seeks to empower nurses by providing them with a useful skillset and positive coping strategies that are appropriate to the clandestine nature of workplace incivility and bullying. Learning Objectives: 1. Differentiate workplace bullying and incivility. 2. Describe strategies for crucial conversations when incivility occurs. 3. Formulate a plan that engages key persons to effectively deal with workplace bullies whose behaviors have been normalized.
Keywords:
crucial conversations; incivility; workplace bullying
Repository Posting Date:
3-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
3-Mar-2017
Other Identifiers:
CHWE17F05
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Creating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen[US]en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleResponding When Incivility Arises in the Workplaceen
dc.title.alternativeResponses to Workplace Bullyingen
dc.contributor.authorKennison, Monicaen
dc.contributor.authorDzurec, Laura C.en
dc.contributor.departmentOmicron Muen
dc.author.detailsMonica Kennison, RN; Laura C. Dzurec, RN, PMHCNS-BC, ANEF, FAANen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621318-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on Saturday, March 18, 2017: Almost a decade has passed since the Joint Commission issued a Sentinel Alert linking intimidating behaviors to medical errors, patient dissatisfaction, and adverse outcomes. More recent studies confirm that workplace acts of incivility, progressing to bullying and even physical abuse in some cases, continue to significantly undermine the culture of safety that facilitates effective healthcare practice. While professional comportment policies pay lip service to what 'should occur' in instances of intimidation and bullying, the inherent, complex and subtle contextual elements of those acts present challenges that supersede the benefits of legislated, cookie cutter approaches to their management. As a result, nurses, whether in practice or educational settings, may find themselves ill-supported as they try to navigate the choppy waters of workplace incivility, even when administrators claim to have established guidelines for addressing it. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies aimed to directly support individual responses to acts of workplace incivility and bullying. The investigators used pragmatic utility to synthesize findings from published studies addressing workplace bullying. The work resulted in new insights and guidance to advance understanding of the target-to-victim cascade that occurs for many who are confronted by the confusing assaults of bullies. Moreover, findings speak to the variance of personal responses to workplace bullying and to the significance of organization-wide commitment to establishing a just culture. Promoting civility and stemming workplace bullying has implications for nurses in all settings. Role modeling professional comportment and implementing policies that recognize the unique responses of individuals who are victimized by their bully counterparts are essential components of supportive work environments and consistent practice for acceptable behavior. However, these skills do not just happen with exposure and it behooves nurses to add to their personal repertoires these highly specialized interpersonal skills. Continued allegiance to organizational policies that support narrow definitions of incivility and that recognize only highly visible workplace bullying affronts will not promote workplaces that are safe and healthy, nor will they support the individuals who work within them. This presentation seeks to empower nurses by providing them with a useful skillset and positive coping strategies that are appropriate to the clandestine nature of workplace incivility and bullying. Learning Objectives: 1. Differentiate workplace bullying and incivility. 2. Describe strategies for crucial conversations when incivility occurs. 3. Formulate a plan that engages key persons to effectively deal with workplace bullies whose behaviors have been normalized.en
dc.subjectcrucial conversationsen
dc.subjectincivilityen
dc.subjectworkplace bullyingen
dc.date.available2017-03-03T14:34:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-03-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-03T14:34:56Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionCreating Healthy Work Environments 2017: Best Practices in Clinical and Academic Settings. Held at the JW Marriott, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen
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