Emergency and SANE Nurses' Acceptance of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault Myths

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621359
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Emergency and SANE Nurses' Acceptance of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault Myths
Author(s):
Smolinski, Laura
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Pi
Author Details:
Laura Smolinski, PhD, RN, email smolinsl@uwosh.edu
Abstract:

Sexual assault is a pervasive problem in our society.  Acceptance of rape myths, such as a believe that rape victims who are intoxicated deserve to be assaulted, adversely affect victims and discourage reporting for treatment.  In this mixed-method, descriptive study, 581 emergency nurses and sexual assault nurse examiners were surveyed to exmine acceptance of rape myths and to determine if differences exist between the acceptance of rape myths and sexual assault training, gender, and education.  Emergency nurses and SANE nurses do not accept rape myths, compared to the general population, with a mean of t(581)=72.405, P<.001.  Nurses with SANE training were less likely to accept rape myths than nurses without SANE training, with a mean of t(581)=3.63, P<.002.  No significant differences existed in the acceptance of rape myths by gender or level of education.  Themes discovered include that rape is about violence, not sex; feelings of blame and guilt; a loss of control; questions that are hard to answer; and a need for education.  Awareness and education regarding rape myths can improve clinical care and may decrease incidence of sexual assault and violence against vulnerable groups

Keywords:
SANE; Rape Myth Acceptance
CINAHL Headings:
Emergency Nursing; Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners; Nurse Attitudes; Sexual Abuse--Psychosocial Factors; Sexual Abuse
Repository Posting Date:
24-Mar-2017
Date of Publication:
24-Mar-2017
Conference Name:
Emergency Nursing 2016
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Los Angeles, CA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.titleEmergency and SANE Nurses' Acceptance of Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault Mythsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmolinski, Lauraen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Pien
dc.author.detailsLaura Smolinski, PhD, RN, email smolinsl@uwosh.eduen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621359-
dc.description.abstract<p>Sexual assault is a pervasive problem in our society.  Acceptance of rape myths, such as a believe that rape victims who are intoxicated deserve to be assaulted, adversely affect victims and discourage reporting for treatment.  In this mixed-method, descriptive study, 581 emergency nurses and sexual assault nurse examiners were surveyed to exmine acceptance of rape myths and to determine if differences exist between the acceptance of rape myths and sexual assault training, gender, and education.  Emergency nurses and SANE nurses do not accept rape myths, compared to the general population, with a mean of t(581)=72.405, P<.001.  Nurses with SANE training were less likely to accept rape myths than nurses without SANE training, with a mean of t(581)=3.63, P<.002.  No significant differences existed in the acceptance of rape myths by gender or level of education.  Themes discovered include that rape is about violence, not sex; feelings of blame and guilt; a loss of control; questions that are hard to answer; and a need for education.  Awareness and education regarding rape myths can improve clinical care and may decrease incidence of sexual assault and violence against vulnerable groups</p>en
dc.subjectSANEen
dc.subjectRape Myth Acceptanceen
dc.subject.cinahlEmergency Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Assault Nurse Examinersen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Abuse--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Abuseen
dc.date.available2017-03-24T19:39:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T19:39:32Z-
dc.conference.nameEmergency Nursing 2016en
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen
dc.conference.locationLos Angeles, CAen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.