RN Perceptions of Coworker Incivility and Collective Efficacy as Influential to Hospital Structures and Outcomes

12.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621360
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
RN Perceptions of Coworker Incivility and Collective Efficacy as Influential to Hospital Structures and Outcomes
Author(s):
Smith, Jessica Grace
Additional Author Information:
Jessica G. Smith, PhD
Advisors:
Morin, Karen H.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Abstract:

Background: An aging population and retiring workforce might affect United States health delivery care and could threaten the quality of care in hospitals. Nurses, as the largest profession in healthcare, can buffer these effects if supported in a safe nurse work environment. The purpose of this dissertation was to understand how peer-to-peer registered nurse workplace incivility as a mediator, and collective efficacy as a moderator, influence relationships among hospital structures (i.e. nurse manager leadership and staffing) and hospital outcomes (i.e. missed nursing care and patient safety cultures). 

Methods: Donabedian’s (1980) structure-process-outcomes conceptual framework was the theoretical basis for this study. A cross-sectional, correlational design was employed that involved path analysis to investigate a conditional process model. Six instruments were administered online: 1) the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety; 2) the Acute Care Missed Nursing Care Subscale; 3) the Workplace Incivility Scale (WIS); 4) the Collective Efficacy Beliefs Scale; 5) the Practice Environment subscale of the Nursing Work Index; and 6) a demographic information form. In all, surveys comprised 117 items. 
Findings: The total sample (N) was 212. There were small to moderate inverse relationships between: 1.) nurse manager leadership and coworker incivility (r = -.38, N = 212, p patient safety culture (r = -.19, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a moderate positive relationship between nurse manager leadership and patient safety culture (r = .36, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a moderate relationship between staffing and patient safety culture (r = .30, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a small inverse correlation between the level of staffing and missed nursing care (r = -.15, n = 212, p < .05). The relationship between missed nursing care and the structure and process variables was not influenced by the mediator variable, coworker incivility. Missed nursing care was not significant as an outcome variable with or without coworker incivility as a mediator. Patient safety culture was not significant as an outcome variable with coworker incivility as a mediator or with collective efficacy as a moderator. Inspection of hierarchical regression indicated that nurse manager leadership, staffing, and coworker incivility predicted 15% of the variance for patient safety culture, with nurse manager leadership explaining most of the variance.
Implications: Results support the important role nurse manager leadership can play in relation to patient safety outcomes at hospital patient care units. Collective efficacy among registered nurse peers and hospital staff should be further studied through research to better understand its direct
effect on improving patient safety cultures.
Limitations: Results may be limited to Magnet hospitals. Response rate was low (7.8%) with a potential for sample bias.
Recommendations: Further instrumental development of the Missed Nursing Care Survey is needed. More advanced methodological approaches to studying missed nursing care may improve the validity for measuring this phenomenon.

Keywords:
coworker incivility; Work Engagement
CINAHL Headings:
Work Environment--Psychosocial Factors; Work Environment; Intraprofessional Relations; Interpersonal Relations; Bullying--Prevention and Control; Bullying; Nurse Attitudes; Registered Nurses--Psychosocial Factors; Registered Nurses; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Leadership; Nurse Managers; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; Nursing Care; Patient Safety; Quality of Nursing Care; Perception; Disruptive Behavior
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the UWM Digital Commons Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 1205 at http://dc.uwm.edu/etd. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-03-29T16:31:17Z
Date of Publication:
2017-03-29

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMorin, Karen H.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jessica Graceen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-29T16:31:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-29T16:31:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-29-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621360-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the UWM Digital Commons Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 1205 at http://dc.uwm.edu/etd. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: An aging population and retiring workforce might affect United States health delivery care and could threaten the quality of care in hospitals. Nurses, as the largest profession in healthcare, can buffer these effects if supported in a safe nurse work environment. The purpose of this dissertation was to understand how peer-to-peer registered nurse workplace incivility as a mediator, and collective efficacy as a moderator, influence relationships among hospital structures (i.e. nurse manager leadership and staffing) and hospital outcomes (i.e. missed nursing care and patient safety cultures). </p> <p>Methods: Donabedian’s (1980) structure-process-outcomes conceptual framework was the theoretical basis for this study. A cross-sectional, correlational design was employed that involved path analysis to investigate a conditional process model. Six instruments were administered online: 1) the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety; 2) the Acute Care Missed Nursing Care Subscale; 3) the Workplace Incivility Scale (WIS); 4) the Collective Efficacy Beliefs Scale; 5) the Practice Environment subscale of the Nursing Work Index; and 6) a demographic information form. In all, surveys comprised 117 items. <br />Findings: The total sample (N) was 212. There were small to moderate inverse relationships between: 1.) nurse manager leadership and coworker incivility (r = -.38, N = 212, p patient safety culture (r = -.19, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a moderate positive relationship between nurse manager leadership and patient safety culture (r = .36, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a moderate relationship between staffing and patient safety culture (r = .30, n = 212, p < 0.01). There was a small inverse correlation between the level of staffing and missed nursing care (r = -.15, n = 212, p < .05). The relationship between missed nursing care and the structure and process variables was not influenced by the mediator variable, coworker incivility. Missed nursing care was not significant as an outcome variable with or without coworker incivility as a mediator. Patient safety culture was not significant as an outcome variable with coworker incivility as a mediator or with collective efficacy as a moderator. Inspection of hierarchical regression indicated that nurse manager leadership, staffing, and coworker incivility predicted 15% of the variance for patient safety culture, with nurse manager leadership explaining most of the variance.<br />Implications: Results support the important role nurse manager leadership can play in relation to patient safety outcomes at hospital patient care units. Collective efficacy among registered nurse peers and hospital staff should be further studied through research to better understand its direct<br />effect on improving patient safety cultures.<br />Limitations: Results may be limited to Magnet hospitals. Response rate was low (7.8%) with a potential for sample bias.<br />Recommendations: Further instrumental development of the Missed Nursing Care Survey is needed. More advanced methodological approaches to studying missed nursing care may improve the validity for measuring this phenomenon.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectcoworker incivilityen
dc.subjectWork Engagementen
dc.titleRN Perceptions of Coworker Incivility and Collective Efficacy as Influential to Hospital Structures and Outcomesen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Wisconsin, Milwaukeeen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsJessica G. Smith, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Environment--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Environmenten
dc.subject.cinahlIntraprofessional Relationsen
dc.subject.cinahlInterpersonal Relationsen
dc.subject.cinahlBullying--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlBullyingen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nurses--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlRegistered Nursesen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Staff, Hospitalen
dc.subject.cinahlLeadershipen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Managersen
dc.subject.cinahlPersonnel Staffing and Schedulingen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Careen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Safetyen
dc.subject.cinahlQuality of Nursing Careen
dc.subject.cinahlPerceptionen
dc.subject.cinahlDisruptive Behavioren
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.