How Well do Providers Screen for Depression and Suicide in Adolescents?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621362
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Thesis
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
How Well do Providers Screen for Depression and Suicide in Adolescents?
Author(s):
Godsey, Judi Allyn
Additional Author Information:
Judi Allyn Frerick Godsey, RN, BSN, MSN
Advisors:
Robinson, Denise; Keller, Ann
Degree:
Master’s
Degree Year:
2005
Grantor:
Northern Kentucky University
Abstract:

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15-24 year olds. Research indicates that suicide can be prevented with early screening and treatment. More than 50% of patients suffering from some form of mental disorder are seen only by their primary care provider. This data suggests that screening measures within the primary care setting can be instrumental in identifying risk behaviors among adolescents who
may be considered at risk for depression and suicide. This descriptive, comparative, quantitative study examined the documentation of primary care physicians, pediatricians and nurse practitioners regarding high risk behavioral indicators that could signal depression or suicide potential in their adolescent patient population (aged 12-17). A random, convenience sample of 102 charts was performed. The conceptual framework as defined by the Quality Assurance Model Using Research (QAMUR) was utilized. Descriptive statistics revealed that all provider types documented some level of risk behavior indicator assessment. A significant difference was found in the number of risk behavior indicators documented between primary care physicians and pediatricians (F=2.80, p=0.072) and between primary care physicians and nurse practitioners (F=2.80, p=0.026). No significant difference was found between the mean number of risk behaviors documented by nurse practitioners and pediatricians.

Keywords:
Adolescents; Suicide screening
CINAHL Headings:
Suicide--Prevention and Control--In Adolescence; Suicide--Prevention and Control; Suicide; Depression-- Diagnosis-- In Adolescence; Depression-- Diagnosis; Depression; Health Screening
Description:
The author retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-04-13T16:37:23Z
Date of Publication:
2017-04-13

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, Deniseen
dc.contributor.advisorKeller, Annen
dc.contributor.authorGodsey, Judi Allynen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T16:37:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-13T16:37:23Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621362-
dc.descriptionThe author retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15-24 year olds. Research indicates that suicide can be prevented with early screening and treatment. More than 50% of patients suffering from some form of mental disorder are seen only by their primary care provider. This data suggests that screening measures within the primary care setting can be instrumental in identifying risk behaviors among adolescents who<br />may be considered at risk for depression and suicide. This descriptive, comparative, quantitative study examined the documentation of primary care physicians, pediatricians and nurse practitioners regarding high risk behavioral indicators that could signal depression or suicide potential in their adolescent patient population (aged 12-17). A random, convenience sample of 102 charts was performed. The conceptual framework as defined by the Quality Assurance Model Using Research (QAMUR) was utilized. Descriptive statistics revealed that all provider types documented some level of risk behavior indicator assessment. A significant difference was found in the number of risk behavior indicators documented between primary care physicians and pediatricians (F=2.80, p=0.072) and between primary care physicians and nurse practitioners (F=2.80, p=0.026). No significant difference was found between the mean number of risk behaviors documented by nurse practitioners and pediatricians.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAdolescentsen
dc.subjectSuicide screeningen
dc.titleHow Well do Providers Screen for Depression and Suicide in Adolescents?en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Kentucky Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMaster’sen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsJudi Allyn Frerick Godsey, RN, BSN, MSNen
thesis.degree.year2005en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlSuicide--Prevention and Control--In Adolescenceen
dc.subject.cinahlSuicide--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlSuicideen
dc.subject.cinahlDepression-- Diagnosis-- In Adolescenceen
dc.subject.cinahlDepression-- Diagnosisen
dc.subject.cinahlDepressionen
dc.subject.cinahlHealth Screeningen
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