2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621363
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Increasing Resilience in Adolescent Nursing Students
Author(s):
Stephens, Teresa Maggard
Additional Author Information:
Teresa Maggard Stephens, RN, PhD
Advisors:
Gunther, Mary E.; Phillips, Kenneth D.; Roman, Marian W.; Orme, John G.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2012
Grantor:
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Abstract:

Nursing students not only face the same developmental challenges as other
college students, but also experience unique stressors that contribute to increased risk for negative outcomes. The intimate nature of patient care, the exposure to workplace adversity, death and dying, and the chaotic nature of healthcare can have cumulative negative effects on students’ health and well-being. Increased resilience could prove useful in helping students confidently face challenges and successfully move forward.
The lack of empirical evidence regarding resilience-enhancing interventions with nursing students supports the need for examining the effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase resilience in adolescent baccalaureate nursing students. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention delivered via
Twitter to increase resilience and sense of support, as well as decrease perceived stress, in a sample of adolescent baccalaureate nursing students, and (2) to describe the personal characteristics of this sample of nursing students. Ahern’s model of adolescent resilience, as adapted from Rew and Horner’s youth resilience framework, was the guiding theoretical model for the study. The study was a multisite experimental repeated measures design with a follow-up email survey. Participants were a sample of 70 randomly assigned junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two statesupported universities in the southeastern United States. Both groups completed three instruments, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sense of Support Scale (SSS), and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) at three times of measurement.
Multilevel modeling was used to examine growth trajectories over time. Both groups showed a decline in perceived stress, but the control group demonstrated a greater decrease in scores at follow-up. No statistically significant difference was detected between groups in terms of sense of support. The experimental group demonstrated an increase in resilience from pretest to posttest, but declined at follow-up. Despite these unexpected findings, results of the email survey indicate the intervention was beneficial to some students. Strengths of the study include the innovative intervention using Twitter, the use of repeated measures, the use of multilevel modeling to analyze longitudinal data, and the first known use of Ahern’s model as a guiding framework. 

Keywords:
Nursing Students; Work Stress
CINAHL Headings:
Students, Nursing; Student Retention; Students, Nursing--Psychosocial Factors--In Adolescence; Students, Nursing--Psychosocial Factors
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the University of Tennessee, Knoxville TRACE: Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-04-13T17:04:41Z
Date of Publication:
2017-04-13

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGunther, Mary E.en
dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Kenneth D.en
dc.contributor.advisorRoman, Marian W.en
dc.contributor.advisorOrme, John G.en
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Teresa Maggarden
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T17:04:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-13T17:04:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621363-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the University of Tennessee, Knoxville TRACE: Tennessee Research and Creative Exchange. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Nursing students not only face the same developmental challenges as other<br />college students, but also experience unique stressors that contribute to increased risk for negative outcomes. The intimate nature of patient care, the exposure to workplace adversity, death and dying, and the chaotic nature of healthcare can have cumulative negative effects on students’ health and well-being. Increased resilience could prove useful in helping students confidently face challenges and successfully move forward.<br />The lack of empirical evidence regarding resilience-enhancing interventions with nursing students supports the need for examining the effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase resilience in adolescent baccalaureate nursing students. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention delivered via<br />Twitter to increase resilience and sense of support, as well as decrease perceived stress, in a sample of adolescent baccalaureate nursing students, and (2) to describe the personal characteristics of this sample of nursing students. Ahern’s model of adolescent resilience, as adapted from Rew and Horner’s youth resilience framework, was the guiding theoretical model for the study. The study was a multisite experimental repeated measures design with a follow-up email survey. Participants were a sample of 70 randomly assigned junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two statesupported universities in the southeastern United States. Both groups completed three instruments, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sense of Support Scale (SSS), and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) at three times of measurement.<br />Multilevel modeling was used to examine growth trajectories over time. Both groups <span style="font-size: 10pt;">showed a decline in perceived stress, but the control group demonstrated a greater </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">decrease in scores at follow-up. No statistically significant difference was detected </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">between groups in terms of sense of support. The experimental group demonstrated an </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">increase in resilience from pretest to posttest, but declined at follow-up. Despite these </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">unexpected findings, results of the email survey indicate the intervention was beneficial </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">to some students. Strengths of the study include the innovative intervention using </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Twitter, the use of repeated measures, the use of multilevel modeling to analyze </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">longitudinal data, and the first known use of Ahern’s model as a guiding framework. </span></p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectNursing Studentsen
dc.subjectWork Stressen
dc.titleIncreasing Resilience in Adolescent Nursing Studentsen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Tennessee, Knoxvilleen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsTeresa Maggard Stephens, RN, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2012en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelRandomized Controlled Trialen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlStudent Retentionen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Nursing--Psychosocial Factors--In Adolescenceen
dc.subject.cinahlStudents, Nursing--Psychosocial Factorsen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.