15.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621367
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Phenomenology
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Exploring Nurse's Feelings on Floating: A Phenomenological Study
Author(s):
Lafontant, Marie-Paule M.
Additional Author Information:
Marie-Paule M. Lafontant, PhD, RN
Advisors:
Blevins, Dean; Romer, Charlene; Ward, Paul G.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
University of Phoenix
Abstract:

The purpose of the current study was to explore nurses’ lived experiences floating in an acute health care facility within a large southern city of the United States. Husserl’s transcendental approach assisted in capturing the essence of floating as a lived phenomenon occurring in the nurses’ natural work environment. Karasek job demandcontrol was the theoretical framework. The study data analysis was conducted using the NVivo 10 software and Giorgi’s six steps, reflecting Husserl’s descriptive transcendental phenomenology. The study purposive sample included eleven full-time staff male and female registered nurses who routinely float to other units. Participants described their feelings on floating during digitally recorded interviews based on three open-ended interview questions aligned with the research questions to address the research purpose. Six themes emerging from the data analysis were (1) workflow process, (2) patients care assignment, (3) work environment, (4) psychological components, (5) sociological factors, and (6) physiological needs. Nurses expressed concerns about their ability to deliver quality, safe patients care in areas different from their area of expertise. In this study, nurses recognized that they have to float for diverse reasons, a finding different from previous studies. A conclusive evidence from this study was that nurses are reluctant to float but will do so comfortably if there were some measures in place to ease the process. The recommendations included ideas for changes in floating based on the data analyzed from participants’ responses.

Keywords:
Floating; Nursing Work Experiences
CINAHL Headings:
Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Work Assignments; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling; Phenomenology
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10102626; ProQuest document ID: 1786671612. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-04-13T20:28:34Z
Date of Publication:
2017-04-13

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBlevins, Deanen
dc.contributor.advisorRomer, Charleneen
dc.contributor.advisorWard, Paul G.en
dc.contributor.authorLafontant, Marie-Paule M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T20:28:34Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-13T20:28:34Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621367-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10102626; ProQuest document ID: 1786671612. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>The purpose of the current study was to explore nurses’ lived experiences floating in an acute health care facility within a large southern city of the United States. Husserl’s transcendental approach assisted in capturing the essence of floating as a lived phenomenon occurring in the nurses’ natural work environment. Karasek job demandcontrol was the theoretical framework. The study data analysis was conducted using the NVivo 10 software and Giorgi’s six steps, reflecting Husserl’s descriptive transcendental phenomenology. The study purposive sample included eleven full-time staff male and female registered nurses who routinely float to other units. Participants described their feelings on floating during digitally recorded interviews based on three open-ended interview questions aligned with the research questions to address the research purpose. Six themes emerging from the data analysis were (1) workflow process, (2) patients care assignment, (3) work environment, (4) psychological components, (5) sociological factors, and (6) physiological needs. Nurses expressed concerns about their ability to deliver quality, safe patients care in areas different from their area of expertise. In this study, nurses recognized that they have to float for diverse reasons, a finding different from previous studies. A conclusive evidence from this study was that nurses are reluctant to float but will do so comfortably if there were some measures in place to ease the process. The recommendations included ideas for changes in floating based on the data analyzed from participants’ responses.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectFloatingen
dc.subjectNursing Work Experiencesen
dc.titleExploring Nurse's Feelings on Floating: A Phenomenological Studyen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Phoenixen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsMarie-Paule M. Lafontant, PhD, RNen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Phenomenologyen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Staff, Hospitalen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Assignmentsen
dc.subject.cinahlPersonnel Staffing and Schedulingen
dc.subject.cinahlPhenomenologyen
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