Influence of Belief System on Adherence to Diabetes Self-Care Management: Pilot study

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621372
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Influence of Belief System on Adherence to Diabetes Self-Care Management: Pilot study
Author(s):
Albargawi, Moudi; Snethen, Julia; AL Gannass, Abdulaziz; Kelber, Sheryl T.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Nu
Author Details:
Moudi Albargawi, MSN, RN, Beta Delta-at-Large Chapter, Eta Nu Chapter, e-mail: moudi@uwm.edu or msalbargawi@hotmail.com; Julia Snethen, PhD, RN, Eta Nu Chapter, e-mail: julia@uwm.edu; Abdulaziz AL Gannass, DPM; Sheryl Kelber, MS.
Abstract:

Background: The prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) has increased among the adult population in Saudi Arabia, as well as the development of secondary health problems. A major concern is that Saudis with T2DM fail to perform their diabetes self-care management. A person’s belief system influences their health behaviors; however, no studies were found that examined the association between the belief system of Saudi adults with T2DM, and their diabetic self-care management.

Purpose: To examine the association between the health beliefs of adults in Saudi Arabia with T2DM and their adherence to diabetes self-care management.

Theoretical Framework: Modified Social Learning Theory.

Description of the sample: Descriptive correlational design using self-reported questionnaires; a convenience sample of 30 participants.

Setting: Participants were recruited from King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh for this pilot study.

Results: Participants belief about their Health Locus of Control (HLOC) moderated the relationship between outcome expectancy and adherence to blood glucose testing was due to chance (p = 0.023), their doctor (p = 0.045), or God (p = 0.013). The relationship between participants belief regarding their self-efficacy and adherence to medication was moderated by their belief that God controlled their health; the stronger the participants belief that God was in control of their health resulted in greater adherence to medication for those with higher self-efficacy (p = 0.035). Participants who expected better health outcomes, yet reported a low internal HLOC, were more likely to follow a specific diet (p = 0.015). Additionally internal HLOC moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and adherence to foot care (p = 0.038).

Conclusions and Implication: Participants belief system was found to influence their level of adherence to diabetes self-care management; however, additional studies are needed using a larger sample.

Keywords:
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus; Self-Care; Diabetes Management; Saudi Adult
CINAHL Headings:
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2--Prevention and Control; Self Care; Patient Compliance; Patient Compliance--Evaluation; Religion and Religions; Saudi Arabia; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2--Prevention and Control--Saudi Arabia
Repository Posting Date:
17-Apr-2017
Date of Publication:
17-Apr-2017
Conference Date:
2016
Conference Name:
18th annual Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference Improving Quality and Safety through Research
Conference Host:
Marquette University College of Nursing and the Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Consortium
Conference Location:
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Description:
First Place Poster Award at Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice 18th Annual Conference. Poster was presented through a poster discussion presentation at the 2016 Midwest Nursing Research Society, 40th Annual Research Conference, Milwaukee, WI.
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleInfluence of Belief System on Adherence to Diabetes Self-Care Management: Pilot study-
dc.contributor.authorAlbargawi, Moudien
dc.contributor.authorSnethen, Juliaen
dc.contributor.authorAL Gannass, Abdulazizen
dc.contributor.authorKelber, Sheryl T.en
dc.contributor.departmentEta Nuen
dc.author.detailsMoudi Albargawi, MSN, RN, Beta Delta-at-Large Chapter, Eta Nu Chapter, e-mail: moudi@uwm.edu or msalbargawi@hotmail.com; Julia Snethen, PhD, RN, Eta Nu Chapter, e-mail: julia@uwm.edu; Abdulaziz AL Gannass, DPM; Sheryl Kelber, MS.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621372-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background: </strong>The prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) has increased among the adult population in Saudi Arabia, as well as the development of secondary health problems. A major concern is that Saudis with T2DM fail to perform their diabetes self-care management. A person’s belief system influences their health behaviors; however, no studies were found that examined the association between the belief system of Saudi adults with T2DM, and their diabetic self-care management.</p> <p><strong>Purpose: </strong>To examine the association between the health beliefs of adults in Saudi Arabia with T2DM and their adherence to diabetes self-care management.</p> <p><strong>Theoretical Framework: </strong>Modified Social Learning Theory.</p> <p><strong>Description of the sample: </strong>Descriptive correlational design using self-reported questionnaires; a convenience sample of 30 participants.</p> <p><strong>Setting:</strong> Participants were recruited from King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh for this pilot study.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Participants belief about their Health Locus of Control (HLOC) moderated the relationship between outcome expectancy and adherence to blood glucose testing was due to chance (p = 0.023), their doctor (p = 0.045), or God (p = 0.013). The relationship between participants belief regarding their self-efficacy and adherence to medication was moderated by their belief that God controlled their health; the stronger the participants belief that God was in control of their health resulted in greater adherence to medication for those with higher self-efficacy (p = 0.035). Participants who expected better health outcomes, yet reported a low internal HLOC, were more likely to follow a specific diet (p = 0.015). Additionally internal HLOC moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and adherence to foot care (p = 0.038).</p> <p><strong>Conclusions and Implication: </strong>Participants belief system was found to influence their level of adherence to diabetes self-care management; however, additional studies are needed using a larger sample.</p>en
dc.subjectType 2 Diabetes Mellitusen
dc.subjectSelf-Careen
dc.subjectDiabetes Managementen
dc.subjectSaudi Adulten
dc.subject.cinahlDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en
dc.subject.cinahlDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlSelf Careen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Complianceen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Compliance--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlReligion and Religionsen
dc.subject.cinahlSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subject.cinahlDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2--Prevention and Control--Saudi Arabiaen
dc.date.available2017-04-17T17:49:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-17-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-17T17:49:17Z-
dc.conference.date2016en
dc.conference.name18th annual Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference Improving Quality and Safety through Researchen
dc.conference.hostMarquette University College of Nursing and the Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Consortiumen
dc.conference.locationMilwaukee, Wisconsin, USAen
dc.descriptionFirst Place Poster Award at Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice 18th Annual Conference. Poster was presented through a poster discussion presentation at the 2016 Midwest Nursing Research Society, 40th Annual Research Conference, Milwaukee, WI.en
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.