Evaluation of an Educational Video: What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621376
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Evaluation of an Educational Video: What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Koss, Tiffany S.; Macci Bires, Angela
Advisors:
Macci Bires, Angela
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Robert Morris University
Abstract:

Background. Anxiety levels in patients diagnosed with cancer are high at the time of diagnosis. Most of these patients do not know what to expect the first day of chemotherapy treatment. This fear of the unknown can cause psychological distress or anxiety. Anxiety may lead to increased occurrences of side effects from cancer treatments, inability to retain information and overall decreased quality of life. Educational interventions may prove beneficial in this population. Video education is becoming more widely used due to advancements in technology.

Objectives. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the content of the educational video What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy. The secondary aim was to identify additional information that would be identified as potential areas of concerns. That information would be important to address in another video or pamphlet. These newly created media guides would provide an informational reference for the chemotherapy naïve patients. Consequently, these media guides would have the potential to increase the knowledge of the patient and caregivers during medical treatments.

Methods. The current study is a mixed methods pilot study that evaluated the content of the video What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy. Prior to the evaluation, a video was designed and created by this researcher.  During the planning phase of the video, a focus group was selected. These individuals were chosen based on their ability to provide information on what was important to for a chemotherapy naïve patient or caregiver to understand on the first day of chemotherapy. 

Following post-production, a post-viewing survey was designed and created.  This survey was reviewed and approved by a clinical statistician. Similarly, a convenience sampling was used for the survey participants.  As with the preproduction focus group, participants within the community were chosen based on common experiences. These included healthcare professionals or staff, former or current oncology patients and individuals who were directly involved with a friend or relative who had received chemotherapy.

Findings. The results were overwhelmingly positive towards the video. Descriptive statistics indicate that the video answered the key questions.  All 22 of the content related questions received mean scores greater than 4.0 based on the five-point Likert scale, (4.0 = agree). All 22 of the relevancy questions received mean scores of greater than 4.0 based on the five-point Likert Scale, (4.0 = relevant).  Three open ended questions were asked to allow the participant to express and provide an opportunity to expand on their answers. 

Keywords:
Chemotherapy; Cancer; Video Recording
CINAHL Headings:
Cancer Patients--Education; Cancer Patients; Chemotherapy, Cancer--Education; Chemotherapy, Cancer; Nursing Practice; Oncologic Nursing; Patient Education--Methods; Patient Education; Videorecording
Description:
Partial funding for the video production provided by a grant awarded by Robert Morris University Regional Research and Innovation in Simulation Education (RISE) Center.
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-04-17T19:39:32Z
Date of Publication:
2017-04-17

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMacci Bires, Angelaen
dc.contributor.authorKoss, Tiffany S.en
dc.contributor.authorMacci Bires, Angelaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-17T19:39:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-17T19:39:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-17-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621376-
dc.descriptionPartial funding for the video production provided by a grant awarded by Robert Morris University Regional Research and Innovation in Simulation Education (RISE) Center.en
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background.</strong> Anxiety levels in patients diagnosed with cancer are high at the time of diagnosis. Most of these patients do not know what to expect the first day of chemotherapy treatment. This fear of the unknown can cause psychological distress or anxiety. Anxiety may lead to increased occurrences of side effects from cancer treatments, inability to retain information and overall decreased quality of life. Educational interventions may prove beneficial in this population. Video education is becoming more widely used due to advancements in technology.</p> <p><strong>Objectives.</strong> The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the content of the educational video <em>What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy</em>. The secondary aim was to identify additional information that would be identified as potential areas of concerns. That information would be important to address in another video or pamphlet. These newly created media guides would provide an informational reference for the chemotherapy naïve patients. Consequently, these media guides would have the potential to increase the knowledge of the patient and caregivers during medical treatments.</p> <p><strong>Methods.</strong> The current study is a mixed methods pilot study that evaluated the content of the video <em>What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapy</em>. Prior to the evaluation, a video was designed and created by this researcher.  During the planning phase of the video, a focus group was selected. These individuals were chosen based on their ability to provide information on what was important to for a chemotherapy naïve patient or caregiver to understand on the first day of chemotherapy. </p> <p>Following post-production, a post-viewing survey was designed and created.  This survey was reviewed and approved by a clinical statistician. Similarly, a convenience sampling was used for the survey participants.  As with the preproduction focus group, participants within the community were chosen based on common experiences. These included healthcare professionals or staff, former or current oncology patients and individuals who were directly involved with a friend or relative who had received chemotherapy.</p> <p><strong>Findings.</strong> The results were overwhelmingly positive towards the video. Descriptive statistics indicate that the video answered the key questions.  All 22 of the content related questions received mean scores greater than 4.0 based on the five-point Likert scale, (4.0 = agree). All 22 of the relevancy questions received mean scores of greater than 4.0 based on the five-point Likert Scale, (4.0 = relevant).  Three open ended questions were asked to allow the participant to express and provide an opportunity to expand on their answers. </p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectChemotherapyen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectVideo Recordingen
dc.titleEvaluation of an Educational Video: What to Expect Your First Day of Chemotherapyen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorRobert Morris Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.en_US
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.subject.cinahlCancer Patients--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlCancer Patientsen
dc.subject.cinahlChemotherapy, Cancer--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlChemotherapy, Canceren
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Practiceen
dc.subject.cinahlOncologic Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Education--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlVideorecordingen
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