Augmenting Sickle Cell Anemia/Sickle Cell Disease Genetic Knowledge Through Simulation: A Descriptive Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621397
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Augmenting Sickle Cell Anemia/Sickle Cell Disease Genetic Knowledge Through Simulation: A Descriptive Pilot Study
Author(s):
Sharoff, Leighsa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Phi
Author Details:
Leighsa Sharoff, EdD, RN, NPP, AHN-BC; Professional Experience: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented through-out the United States and Europe on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs. Author Summary: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented nationally and internationally on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs.
Abstract:

Purpose: Genetic/genomic knowledge has radically changed the way health care is provided. Augmenting this newly required competency into constrained nursing curricula is a challenge. Simulation provides such an opportunity. This post-test pilot descriptive study explored the genetic component of a simulation scenario addressing sickle cell anemia/sickle cell disease exploring students’ and nurse educators’ perceived genetic knowledge. The genetic knowledge of Sickle Cell Anemia/Sickle Cell Disease [SCA/SCD] of pre-licensure baccalaureate undergraduate nursing students, and nurse educators, in a diverse urban nursing school was explored. Thirty-one junior (pediatric simulated scenario; 26 females/4 males) and thirty-one senior (adult medical/surgical simulated scenario; 29 females/2 males) nursing students and eight clinical simulation facilitators (1 male/7 females)were randomly selected to receive the simulation experience with the SCD genetic component. A sickle cell anemia/sickle cell disease case scenario (SCA/SCD; aka Mr. Tony Wallace) was developed with the aim of enhancing students’ experience with genetic knowledge, patient education and care. Junior grade level students, who were scheduled for a pediatric simulation experience, received the simulated patient case of a 3 year old, including appropriate age-related changes in medications, doses and laboratory data. Senior grade level students, who were scheduled for a medical-surgical simulation experience, received the same simulated patient case but the patient was now 24 years old, and included appropriate age-related changes in medications, doses and laboratory data.

Methods: A descriptive, post-test design was employed to evaluate the self-perceptions of genetic knowledge among nursing students and simulation facilitators following a genetic-based simulation experience. A six question survey examined students’ genetic knowledge after their simulation experience, exploring the understanding of the genetic component (SCA/SCD); ability to provide the patient and family with information about SCA/SCD; level of understanding of SCA/SCD appropriate to provide effective and efficient nursing care with appropriate nursing interventions; critical thinking skills about providing genetic information to a patient; clinical judgment about providing genetic information to a patient and asked if this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base of nursing and nursing care. Participants could respond to each question by noting “Strongly agree”, “Agree”, “Disagree” or “Strongly Disagree”. Participants were asked to respond to “How can this simulation integrating genetics be improved to further enhance your overall knowledge?” Data were coded and entered into an SPSS database. Descriptive statistics including frequencies and percentages were utilized for demographic while contingency table analysis was used to summarize the categorical perception data. Per question response rate was 100%. Qualitative data was summarized by the most common themes.

Results: Majority of students (88.6%; mean=1.42) agreed that their understanding of the genetic component of SCA/SCD improved after the simulation; their ability to provide the patient and family with information pertaining to SCA/SCD was satisfactory after the simulation (n=49; mean=1.47); level of understanding of SCA/SCD was appropriate to provide effective and efficient nursing care with appropriate nursing interventions (n=53; mean=1.47); majority agreed that their critical thinking skills (mean=1.42) and clinical judgment (mean=1.45) about providing genetic information improved with this simulation and this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base and nursing care. Comparatively, there was minimal differences noted between junior (pediatric clinical) and senior (adult clinical) to each survey question. All faculty felt that this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base and nursing care.

Conclusions: These pilot findings support integrating a genetic component into simulation to further enhance the genetic knowledge of both students and facilitators. It is imperative that nursing curricula stay abreast of current mandated competencies. Including a genetic component during a simulation experience enhances students’ and nurse educators’ perception of their genetic knowledge base. This evaluation revealed that including a genetic aspect to a simulation experience was not only feasible but was viewed positively by both students and educators. All participants agreed that their genetic knowledge improved after the simulation. With millennial nursing students, it is necessary for nurse educators to provide a variety of learning strategies, engaging students intellectually as well as motivationally. Simulation offers a creative and innovative learning strategy to enhance the genetic knowledge of nursing students. With new knowledge come new responsibilities reflected by the new required competencies. Implementing these competencies into a heavily burdened curriculum requires nurse educators to establish new integrative teaching formats. Simulation prepares students for real-world experiences and as we enter the genetic/genomic era, simulation has an obvious role in expanding and developing these competencies, in a safe and friendly learner-centered environment. By integrating genetics into a simulation, the facilitators’ genetic literacy knowledge base will improve, thus furthering their confidence and ability to assist students to meet these new competencies.

Keywords:
Genetic Knowledge; Nursing Education; Simulation
Repository Posting Date:
25-May-2017
Date of Publication:
25-May-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST436
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleAugmenting Sickle Cell Anemia/Sickle Cell Disease Genetic Knowledge Through Simulation: A Descriptive Pilot Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharoff, Leighsaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Phien
dc.author.detailsLeighsa Sharoff, EdD, RN, NPP, AHN-BC; Professional Experience: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented through-out the United States and Europe on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs. Author Summary: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented nationally and internationally on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621397-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Genetic/genomic knowledge has radically changed the way health care is provided. Augmenting this newly required competency into constrained nursing curricula is a challenge. Simulation provides such an opportunity. This post-test pilot descriptive study explored the genetic component of a simulation scenario addressing sickle cell anemia/sickle cell disease exploring students’ and nurse educators’ perceived genetic knowledge. The genetic knowledge of Sickle Cell Anemia/Sickle Cell Disease [SCA/SCD] of pre-licensure baccalaureate undergraduate nursing students, and nurse educators, in a diverse urban nursing school was explored. Thirty-one junior (pediatric simulated scenario; 26 females/4 males) and thirty-one senior (adult medical/surgical simulated scenario; 29 females/2 males) nursing students and eight clinical simulation facilitators (1 male/7 females)were randomly selected to receive the simulation experience with the SCD genetic component. A sickle cell anemia/sickle cell disease case scenario (SCA/SCD; aka Mr. Tony Wallace) was developed with the aim of enhancing students’ experience with genetic knowledge, patient education and care. Junior grade level students, who were scheduled for a pediatric simulation experience, received the simulated patient case of a 3 year old, including appropriate age-related changes in medications, doses and laboratory data. Senior grade level students, who were scheduled for a medical-surgical simulation experience, received the same simulated patient case but the patient was now 24 years old, and included appropriate age-related changes in medications, doses and laboratory data.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A descriptive, post-test design was employed to evaluate the self-perceptions of genetic knowledge among nursing students and simulation facilitators following a genetic-based simulation experience. A six question survey examined students’ genetic knowledge after their simulation experience, exploring the understanding of the genetic component (SCA/SCD); ability to provide the patient and family with information about SCA/SCD; level of understanding of SCA/SCD appropriate to provide effective and efficient nursing care with appropriate nursing interventions; critical thinking skills about providing genetic information to a patient; clinical judgment about providing genetic information to a patient and asked if this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base of nursing and nursing care. Participants could respond to each question by noting “Strongly agree”, “Agree”, “Disagree” or “Strongly Disagree”. Participants were asked to respond to “How can this simulation integrating genetics be improved to further enhance your overall knowledge?” Data were coded and entered into an SPSS database. Descriptive statistics including frequencies and percentages were utilized for demographic while contingency table analysis was used to summarize the categorical perception data. Per question response rate was 100%. Qualitative data was summarized by the most common themes.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Majority of students (88.6%; mean=1.42) agreed that their understanding of the genetic component of SCA/SCD improved after the simulation; their ability to provide the patient and family with information pertaining to SCA/SCD was satisfactory after the simulation (n=49; mean=1.47); level of understanding of SCA/SCD was appropriate to provide effective and efficient nursing care with appropriate nursing interventions (n=53; mean=1.47); majority agreed that their critical thinking skills (mean=1.42) and clinical judgment (mean=1.45) about providing genetic information improved with this simulation and this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base and nursing care. Comparatively, there was minimal differences noted between junior (pediatric clinical) and senior (adult clinical) to each survey question. All faculty felt that this scenario enhanced their overall ability to integrate genetics into their knowledge base and nursing care.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions: </strong>These pilot findings support integrating a genetic component into simulation to further enhance the genetic knowledge of both students and facilitators. It is imperative that nursing curricula stay abreast of current mandated competencies. Including a genetic component during a simulation experience enhances students’ and nurse educators’ perception of their genetic knowledge base. This evaluation revealed that including a genetic aspect to a simulation experience was not only feasible but was viewed positively by both students and educators. All participants agreed that their genetic knowledge improved after the simulation. With millennial nursing students, it is necessary for nurse educators to provide a variety of learning strategies, engaging students intellectually as well as motivationally. Simulation offers a creative and innovative learning strategy to enhance the genetic knowledge of nursing students. With new knowledge come new responsibilities reflected by the new required competencies. Implementing these competencies into a heavily burdened curriculum requires nurse educators to establish new integrative teaching formats. Simulation prepares students for real-world experiences and as we enter the genetic/genomic era, simulation has an obvious role in expanding and developing these competencies, in a safe and friendly learner-centered environment. By integrating genetics into a simulation, the facilitators’ genetic literacy knowledge base will improve, thus furthering their confidence and ability to assist students to meet these new competencies.</p>en
dc.subjectGenetic Knowledgeen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.date.available2017-05-25T20:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-25-
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-25T20:18:23Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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