The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621408
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
Observational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study
Author(s):
Haithcox, Susan; Ramnes, Carmella R.; Lee, Howard; Lu, John; Lyman, Gary H.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Omicron-at-Large
Abstract:

Background. Quality of life may be affected by daily injections of supportive hematopoietic growth factor medication, which is frequently required by patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The objective of the study was to identify areas where long-acting derivatives of current proteins, which require less frequent administration, may provide advantages over existing therapies that require more frequent administration.

Methods. An observational study was conducted to assess the impact of daily injections of Filgrastim (Neupogen®; Amgen Inc.) on patients' quality of life. A Subject Outcome Questionnaire was administered to patients after chemotherapy on 2 consecutive cycles. Time spent for treatment and patient attitude towards injection frequency were measured. The effect on patients' daily activities, including their ability to work, was analyzed.

Results. Thirty patients completed the first, and 24 the second, administration of the Questionnaire across 3 participating sites in the United States. The average patient time commitment for each daily injection was 78 minutes. Forty-five percent of patients were moderately to extremely bothered by travel during the first chemotherapy cycle, which increased to 59% during the second cycle. Forty-four percent and 18% of patients reported having to rearrange their daily schedules and take time off from work to accommodate each injection at least some of the time, respectively. Eighty-nine percent of the patients reported a preference for a longer-acting drug that required fewer injections.

Conclusion. Results indicate that frequent injections represent a significant burden on patients' lives and that the majority would prefer longer-acting medications that require less frequent administration and potentially fewer clinic visits.

Keywords:
chemotherapy; quality of life; hematopoietic growth factor medications
CINAHL Headings:
Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factors; Quality of Life; Chemotherapy, Cancer; Chemotherapy, Cancer--Methods
Repository Posting Date:
5-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
19-Sep-2003
Version of Published Work:
Publisher's version
Citation:
Haithcox, S., Ramnes, C. R., Lee, H., Lu, J., & Lyman, G. H. (2003). The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study. BMC Nursing, 2 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-2-2. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621408
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd.
Description:
SH and CR assisted in the design of the questionnaire. JL coordinated the study. HL and JL analyzed the data. GHL assisted in the conduct of the study and contributed to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
Note:
This item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelObservational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)en
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleThe impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaithcox, Susanen
dc.contributor.authorRamnes, Carmella R.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, Howarden
dc.contributor.authorLu, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorLyman, Gary H.en
dc.contributor.departmentNu Omicron-at-Largeen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621408-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background.</strong> Quality of life may be affected by daily injections of supportive hematopoietic growth factor medication, which is frequently required by patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The objective of the study was to identify areas where long-acting derivatives of current proteins, which require less frequent administration, may provide advantages over existing therapies that require more frequent administration.</p> <p><strong>Methods.</strong> An observational study was conducted to assess the impact of daily injections of Filgrastim (Neupogen®; Amgen Inc.) on patients' quality of life. A Subject Outcome Questionnaire was administered to patients after chemotherapy on 2 consecutive cycles. Time spent for treatment and patient attitude towards injection frequency were measured. The effect on patients' daily activities, including their ability to work, was analyzed.</p> <p><strong>Results.</strong> Thirty patients completed the first, and 24 the second, administration of the Questionnaire across 3 participating sites in the United States. The average patient time commitment for each daily injection was 78 minutes. Forty-five percent of patients were moderately to extremely bothered by travel during the first chemotherapy cycle, which increased to 59% during the second cycle. Forty-four percent and 18% of patients reported having to rearrange their daily schedules and take time off from work to accommodate each injection at least some of the time, respectively. Eighty-nine percent of the patients reported a preference for a longer-acting drug that required fewer injections.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion.</strong> Results indicate that frequent injections represent a significant burden on patients' lives and that the majority would prefer longer-acting medications that require less frequent administration and potentially fewer clinic visits.</p>en
dc.subjectchemotherapyen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.subjecthematopoietic growth factor medicationsen
dc.subject.cinahlHematopoietic Cell Growth Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlQuality of Lifeen
dc.subject.cinahlChemotherapy, Canceren
dc.subject.cinahlChemotherapy, Cancer--Methodsen
dc.date.available2017-06-05T17:49:27Z-
dc.date.issued2003-09-19-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T17:49:27Z-
dc.type.versionPublisher's versionen
dc.identifier.citationHaithcox, S., Ramnes, C. R., Lee, H., Lu, J., & Lyman, G. H. (2003). The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study. BMC Nursing, 2 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-2-2. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621408en
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6955-
dc.identifier.issnBMC Nursing-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6955-2-2-
dc.identifier.citationHaithcox, S., Ramnes, C. R., Lee, H., Lu, J., & Lyman, G. H. (2003). The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study. BMC Nursing, 2 (1). DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-2-2. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621408en
dc.descriptionSH and CR assisted in the design of the questionnaire. JL coordinated the study. HL and JL analyzed the data. GHL assisted in the conduct of the study and contributed to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.en
dc.description.noteThis item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.