2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621409
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Graduate Students’ Perceived Genetic Knowledge: A Preliminary Study
Author(s):
Sharoff, Leighsa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Phi
Author Details:
Leighsa Sharoff, EdD, RN, NPP, AHN-BC, Professional Experience: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented through-out the United States and Europe on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs. Author Summary: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented nationally and internationally on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs.
Abstract:
Purpose: Summary of a preliminary assessment of graduate nursing students' from the City University of New York [CUNY] knowledge about genetics and genomics.

Methods: Thirty-six graduate students, 7 in a DNP program, were surveyed with the Genetics and Genomics Literacy Assessment (GGLA). This consisted of 16 multiple choice questions, 7 questions related to their perceptions and attitudes about genetics and genomics integration into nursing curricula, 5 questions related to their comfort level about genetics and genomics and 4 demographic items. Data was collected via Survey Monkey converted to SPSS.

Results: Summary of categorical data revealed that the majority of participants for 8 of the survey questions answered correctly [greater than 60%] while 8 questions had significantly lower correct percentages [55% or less]. These included limited knowledge related to understanding the diagnosis of an autosomal recessive disease [26% correct]; reciprocal translocation in the genome [12% correct]; genetic testing concepts [13% correct]; understanding carrier status of X-linked recessive condition [38% correct]; understanding amniocentesis results with phenotypic abnormality [40% correct]; understanding inheritance patterns via pedigree [40% correct]; understanding the concept of penetrance [55% correct] and being able to read a pedigree [20% correct]. The majority [> 75%] of students' attitude is that it is important for nurses and nurse educators to know this content and to be able to teach this material however, the majority [>75%] were not comfortable with teaching or explaining this material.

Conclusion: All nursing students, from pre-licensure to doctoral studies, would benefit from receiving additional education on the foundational concepts of genetics. Genetics and genomics are increasingly relevant in all areas of clinical nursing practice and faculty charged with educating the future generation must have a basic understanding of this content. The required competency of genetic knowledge mandates that all nurses are able to integrate the basic concepts so they can educate and advocate for their patients. Without additional educational preparation, advanced practicing nurses will not be adequately prepared to provide this essential information.

Keywords:
genetic knowledge; nursing education; research
Repository Posting Date:
5-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
5-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST666
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleGraduate Students’ Perceived Genetic Knowledge: A Preliminary Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharoff, Leighsaen
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Phien
dc.author.detailsLeighsa Sharoff, EdD, RN, NPP, AHN-BC, Professional Experience: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented through-out the United States and Europe on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs. Author Summary: Dr. Leighsa Sharoff is an Associate Professor and Simulation Coordinator at Hunter College in New York City. She has presented nationally and internationally on integrating concepts of holistic nursing, simulation, technology and genetics in nursing curricula, from baccalaureate to doctoral programs.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621409-
dc.description.abstract<div><strong>Purpose: </strong>Summary of a preliminary assessment of graduate nursing students' from the City University of New York [CUNY] knowledge about genetics and genomics. <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Thirty-six graduate students, 7 in a DNP program, were surveyed with the Genetics and Genomics Literacy Assessment (GGLA). This consisted of 16 multiple choice questions, 7 questions related to their perceptions and attitudes about genetics and genomics integration into nursing curricula, 5 questions related to their comfort level about genetics and genomics and 4 demographic items. Data was collected via Survey Monkey converted to SPSS.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>Summary of categorical data revealed that the majority of participants for 8 of the survey questions answered correctly [greater than 60%] while 8 questions had significantly lower correct percentages [55% or less]. These included limited knowledge related to understanding the diagnosis of an autosomal recessive disease [26% correct]; reciprocal translocation in the genome [12% correct]; genetic testing concepts [13% correct]; understanding carrier status of X-linked recessive condition [38% correct]; understanding amniocentesis results with phenotypic abnormality [40% correct]; understanding inheritance patterns via pedigree [40% correct]; understanding the concept of penetrance [55% correct] and being able to read a pedigree [20% correct]. The majority [> 75%] of students' attitude is that it is important for nurses and nurse educators to know this content and to be able to teach this material however, the majority [>75%] were not comfortable with teaching or explaining this material.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>All nursing students, from pre-licensure to doctoral studies, would benefit from receiving additional education on the foundational concepts of genetics. Genetics and genomics are increasingly relevant in all areas of clinical nursing practice and faculty charged with educating the future generation must have a basic understanding of this content. The required competency of genetic knowledge mandates that all nurses are able to integrate the basic concepts so they can educate and advocate for their patients. Without additional educational preparation, advanced practicing nurses will not be adequately prepared to provide this essential information.</p> </div>en
dc.subjectgenetic knowledgeen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.date.available2017-06-05T17:55:31Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-05-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T17:55:31Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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