Mediator Role of Memory Function on Diabetes Self-Care Management in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621419
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Mediator Role of Memory Function on Diabetes Self-Care Management in Older Adults
Author(s):
Song, Youngshin; Cho, Jeonghwa; Jun, Younghee; Seo, Kawoun; Park, Keumok; Kim, Bohyun
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Youngshin Song, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present: Professor, College of Nursing Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea 2011-2013: Director of Division of Nursing Department, Eulji University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea 2009-2011: Post-doctoral fellow, Johns Hopkin University, Baltimore, MD, USA 2003-2009: Team Manager in nursing education, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, South Korea 2000-2003: Research fellow, Ajou University, Suwon, South Korea 1991-2000: Nurse staff and Clinical instructor, Daejeon, South Korea Author Summary: Y. Song is a professor of College of Nursing Chungnam National University in South Korea. Reserach area is for diabetes self-care management and its influencing factors. Y. Song was recently granted funding from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF).
Abstract:

Purpose: Memory function is important to perform the special intended tasks. Diabetes self-care composed of several complex tasks such as regularly check the glucose monitor, balance of diet and physical activity, and foot care. For improving diabetes self-care, higher diabetes self-efficacy as an essential factor was emphasized in studies. Despite of having higher self-efficacy in cognitively intact older adults with diabetes, individual behaviors on diabetes self-care is not same level. In order to transfer the intended behavior from self-efficacy, memory should be embedded. Memory function may help the self-initiated behavior such as diabetes self-care. However, little empirical evidences regarding the effects of memory function on self-efficacy and self-care management was found in adults with diabetes. Therefore, this study was to identify the role of memory function on the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care behavior for older adults with diabetes.

Hypothesis 1: Diabetes self-efficacy and memory function will significantly associate with diabetes self-care management.

Hypothesis 2: The relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management will be mediated by memory function.

Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study design was conducted with a sample of 259 older adults (+65 years) with diabetes. Using structure equation model, the direct effect of diabetes self-efficacy and memory function on diabetes self-care management was estimated. After then, indirect effect of diabetes self-efficacy on self-care management after controlling for memory function as a mediator was estimated in the path diagram.

Results: The mean age of participants was 72yrs, and the mean year of diabetes was 12 yrs.

Hypothesis 1: Diabetes self-care management was positively associated with self-efficacy (r=0.55, p<.001), whereas memory function was negatively correlated with diabetes self-efficacy (r=-0.19, p=.003) and self-care management (r= -0. 29, p<.001) in correlation matrix. The hypothesis 1 was confirmed

Hypothesis 2: Diabetes self-efficacy significantly predicted the diabetes self-care management (β = 0.79, p = .009) and memory function (β = -0.22, p=.006) in older adults with diabetes. Lower memory function was also significantly associated with greater self-care management (β = -0.20, p = .043). However, when memory function was entered as a mediator in the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management, the direct effect between two was changed from β = -0.79 (p=.009) to β =0.04 (p = .017). That is, the memory function was a partial mediator between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management in older adults with diabetes. Thus, hypothesis 2 was confirmed.

Conclusion: A structural equation model confirmed the mediator role of memory function on the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management in older adults. Therefore, for improving the diabetes self-care management in older adults with diabetes, health care provider should consider not only to enhance the diabetes self-efficacy but also to monitor individual function of memory in older adults.

Keywords:
Aging; Diabetes Mellitus; Memory
Repository Posting Date:
5-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
5-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST671
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleMediator Role of Memory Function on Diabetes Self-Care Management in Older Adultsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSong, Youngshinen
dc.contributor.authorCho, Jeonghwaen
dc.contributor.authorJun, Youngheeen
dc.contributor.authorSeo, Kawounen
dc.contributor.authorPark, Keumoken
dc.contributor.authorKim, Bohyunen
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen
dc.author.detailsYoungshin Song, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2013-present: Professor, College of Nursing Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea 2011-2013: Director of Division of Nursing Department, Eulji University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea 2009-2011: Post-doctoral fellow, Johns Hopkin University, Baltimore, MD, USA 2003-2009: Team Manager in nursing education, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, South Korea 2000-2003: Research fellow, Ajou University, Suwon, South Korea 1991-2000: Nurse staff and Clinical instructor, Daejeon, South Korea Author Summary: Y. Song is a professor of College of Nursing Chungnam National University in South Korea. Reserach area is for diabetes self-care management and its influencing factors. Y. Song was recently granted funding from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF).en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621419-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Memory function is important to perform the special intended tasks. Diabetes self-care composed of several complex tasks such as regularly check the glucose monitor, balance of diet and physical activity, and foot care. For improving diabetes self-care, </span><span lang="EN-US">higher diabetes self-efficacy as an essential factor was emphasized in studies. </span><span>Despite of having higher self-efficacy in cognitively intact older adults with diabetes, individual behaviors on diabetes self-care is not same level. </span><span lang="EN-US">In order to transfer the intended behavior from self-efficacy, memory should be embedded. M</span><span>emory function may help the self-initiated behavior such as diabetes self-care. However, little empirical evidences regarding the effects of memory function on self-efficacy and self-care management was found in adults with diabetes. Therefore, this study was to identify the role of memory function on the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care behavior for older adults with diabetes.</span></p> <p>Hypothesis 1: Diabetes self-efficacy and memory function will significantly associate with diabetes self-care management.</p> <p>Hypothesis 2: The relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management will be mediated by memory function.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>The descriptive cross-sectional study design was conducted with a sample of 259 older adults (+65 years) with diabetes. Using structure equation model, the direct effect of diabetes self-efficacy and memory function on diabetes self-care management was estimated. After then, indirect effect of diabetes self-efficacy on self-care management after controlling for memory function as a mediator was estimated in the path diagram.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>The mean age of participants was 72yrs, and the mean year of diabetes was 12 yrs.</p> <p>Hypothesis 1: Diabetes self-care management was positively associated with self-efficacy (r=0.55, p<.001), whereas memory function was negatively correlated with diabetes self-efficacy (r=-0.19, p=.003) and self-care management (r= -0. 29, p<.001) in correlation matrix. The hypothesis 1 was confirmed</p> <p>Hypothesis 2: Diabetes self-efficacy significantly predicted the diabetes self-care management (β = 0.79, p = .009) and memory function (β = -0.22, p=.006) in older adults with diabetes. Lower memory function was also significantly associated with greater self-care management (β = -0.20, p = .043). However, when memory function was entered as a mediator in the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management, the direct effect between two was changed from β = -0.79 (p=.009) to β =0.04 (p = .017). That is, the memory function was a partial mediator between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management in older adults with diabetes. Thus, hypothesis 2 was confirmed.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>A structural equation model confirmed the mediator role of memory function on the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and self-care management in older adults. Therefore, for improving the diabetes self-care management in older adults with diabetes, health care provider should consider not only to enhance the diabetes self-efficacy but also to monitor individual function of memory in older adults.</p>en
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.date.available2017-06-05T20:18:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-05-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T20:18:05Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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