Clinicians and Bicultural Workers' Views on Coassessment to Improve Mental Health Assessments in Multicultural Clients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621424
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Clinicians and Bicultural Workers' Views on Coassessment to Improve Mental Health Assessments in Multicultural Clients
Other Titles:
Care of Minority Populations
Author(s):
Henderson, Saras
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Delta
Author Details:
Saras Henderson, PhD, MEd, RN, FRCN, Professional Experience: I am an academic in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Griffith University, QLD, Australia I teach undergraduate and postgraduate nursing students and supervise higher degree students. My current project is on evaluating the use of Narrative Exposure Therapy for reducing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in patients. I have successfully supervised several Honours and HDR students. Author Summary: Associate Professor Saras Henderson has experience in classroom and clinical nursing education. She has a PhD in nursing and a Master degree in Education. Saras has successfully obtained grants to develop best practice in clinical nurse education. Saras also has expertise in community nursing and her research includes culturally and linguistically diverse communities and health care. Her recent research has been with multicultural mental health populations.
Abstract:

Purpose:

In Australia, multicultural people are over­represented in mental health inpatient facilities and are more likely to be on involuntary orders (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2012; Warnock-Parks et al., 2010). This is partly attributable to the many cultural and language barriers limiting access to and effective utilisation of services (Queensland Health, 2012). In Australia, mental health services use a service delivery model that provides clinicians such as mental health nurses, psychologist, psychiatrist, social workers with interpreters to overcome language barriers which is important in producing accurate assessments and diagnosis but do not address cultural barriers (Scala, 2012). Overcoming cultural barriers is more complicated but understanding how culture impacts on mental health and help seeking behaviour can improve mental health outcomes for multicultural communities (Owiti et al. 2014; Scala, 2012). Typically an ethnic matching model of matching the ethnicity of the mental health professional and client has been used with some success (Cabral & Smith, 2011). One Australian study using ethnic matching reported reductions in crisis presentations and hospital admissions and an increase in contact with community mental health services (Ziguras et al., 2003). However, ethnic matching has limitations; in particular it is difficult to find a range of ethnically diverse mental health professionals to respond to the broad cultural diversity of clients/patients. Ethnic matching is particularly difficult in Australia when there is an increasing number of new and emerging communities, in which there are only a few or no mental health professionals within the population. To overcome this problem and to ensure mental health assessments are culturally appropriate, the co-assessment model which pairs a mental health clinician with a bicultural worker to jointly assess multicultural clients was used in an Australian mental health facility. It was envisaged that the use of the co-assessed model would help clinicians to better understand how cultural factors impact on clients’ understanding of mental health. The purpose of our study was to explore clinicians and bicultural workers’ views on using the co-­assessment model.

Methods:  Qualitative design was used with a purposeful sample of nine clinicians and nine bicultural workers drawn from a transcultural mental health facility. Using semi-structured open-ended questions, two focus group interviews, one with the clinicians and one with the bicultural workers were conducted. Information was sought from participants on the co-assessment process, perceived benefits and challenges, and how the model differed from the use of interpreters. Data were transcribed verbatim, coded and analysed using content analysis

Results:  The findings indicate the model is effective in increasing cultural understanding and sensitivity in mental health assessments. Clinicians found bicultural workers provided the cultural lens to better assess and diagnose clients. Bi-cultural workers stated their cultural and personal experience in the assessment process facilitated a holistic approach. A common challenge for participants was time constraints and the blurring of role boundaries.

Conclusion:  Our findings suggest the co-assessment model has applicability to mental health nurses and health professionals to enhance optimum assessment outcomes for multicultural communities.

Keywords:
mental health assessment; mental health assessment model; co-assessment model using bi-cultural workers
Repository Posting Date:
6-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B13
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleClinicians and Bicultural Workers' Views on Coassessment to Improve Mental Health Assessments in Multicultural Clientsen_US
dc.title.alternativeCare of Minority Populationsen
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Sarasen
dc.contributor.departmentPi Deltaen
dc.author.detailsSaras Henderson, PhD, MEd, RN, FRCN, Professional Experience: I am an academic in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Griffith University, QLD, Australia I teach undergraduate and postgraduate nursing students and supervise higher degree students. My current project is on evaluating the use of Narrative Exposure Therapy for reducing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in patients. I have successfully supervised several Honours and HDR students. Author Summary: Associate Professor Saras Henderson has experience in classroom and clinical nursing education. She has a PhD in nursing and a Master degree in Education. Saras has successfully obtained grants to develop best practice in clinical nurse education. Saras also has expertise in community nursing and her research includes culturally and linguistically diverse communities and health care. Her recent research has been with multicultural mental health populations.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621424-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>In Australia, multicultural people are over­represented in mental health inpatient facilities and are more likely to be on involuntary orders (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2012; Warnock-Parks et al., 2010). This is partly attributable to the many cultural and language barriers limiting access to and effective utilisation of services (Queensland Health, 2012). In Australia, mental health services use a service delivery model that provides clinicians such as mental health nurses, psychologist, psychiatrist, social workers with interpreters to overcome language barriers which is important in producing accurate assessments and diagnosis but do not address cultural barriers (Scala, 2012). Overcoming cultural barriers is more complicated but understanding how culture impacts on mental health and help seeking behaviour can improve mental health outcomes for multicultural communities (Owiti et al. 2014; Scala, 2012). Typically an ethnic matching model of matching the ethnicity of the mental health professional and client has been used with some success (Cabral & Smith, 2011). One Australian study using ethnic matching reported reductions in crisis presentations and hospital admissions and an increase in contact with community mental health services (Ziguras et al., 2003). However, ethnic matching has limitations; in particular it is difficult to find a range of ethnically diverse mental health professionals to respond to the broad cultural diversity of clients/patients. Ethnic matching is particularly difficult in Australia when there is an increasing number of new and emerging communities, in which there are only a few or no mental health professionals within the population. To overcome this problem and to ensure mental health assessments are culturally appropriate, the co-assessment model which pairs a mental health clinician with a bicultural worker to jointly assess multicultural clients was used in an Australian mental health facility. It was envisaged that the use of the co-assessed model would help clinicians to better understand how cultural factors impact on clients’ understanding of mental health. The purpose of our study was to explore clinicians and bicultural workers’ views on using the co-­assessment model.</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong> Qualitative design was used with a purposeful sample of nine clinicians and nine bicultural workers drawn from a transcultural mental health facility. Using semi-structured open-ended questions, two focus group interviews, one with the clinicians and one with the bicultural workers were conducted. Information was sought from participants on the co-assessment process, perceived benefits and challenges, and how the model differed from the use of interpreters. Data were transcribed verbatim, coded and analysed using content analysis</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> The findings indicate the model is effective in increasing cultural understanding and sensitivity in mental health assessments. Clinicians found bicultural workers provided the cultural lens to better assess and diagnose clients. Bi-cultural workers stated their cultural and personal experience in the assessment process facilitated a holistic approach. A common challenge for participants was time constraints and the blurring of role boundaries.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> Our findings suggest the co-assessment model has applicability to mental health nurses and health professionals to enhance optimum assessment outcomes for multicultural communities.</p>en
dc.subjectmental health assessmenten
dc.subjectmental health assessment modelen
dc.subjectco-assessment model using bi-cultural workersen
dc.date.available2017-06-06T13:36:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T13:36:26Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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