2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621435
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Nursing Rounds: A Best Practice Implementation
Author(s):
Daniels, Juli
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Psi
Author Details:
Juli Daniels, PhD, CCRN, CNE, NEA-BC, LHRM, Professional Experience: Dr. Daniels is a leader in her community and a member of the following professional organizations: • American Nurses Association/Florida Nurses Association (ANA/FNA) • Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society (STTI) Virginia Henderson Fellow • American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) CCRN Item Writer 1997 - 2002. Excellence in Leadership Award 1998 • American Organization of Nursing Executives (AONE) Author Summary: Dr. Daniels has been an executive coach, mentor, and advocate for nurses across the United States, in the pursuit of clinical and administrative excellence. Dr. Daniels has been a nursing instructor for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs and served as the Evidence Synthesis Group (ESG) convenor by the Joanna Briggs Institute, Adelaide, Australia. Dr. Daniels has published in refereed journals nationally and internationally and has served as consultant for many academic and acute care organizations.
Abstract:

Background

Purposeful and timely rounding is a best practice intervention to routinely meet patient care needs, ensure patient safety, decrease the occurrence of patient preventable events, and proactively address problems before they occur. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) endorsed hourly rounding as the best way to reduce call lights and fall injuries, and increase both quality of care and patient satisfaction. Nurse knowledge regarding purposeful rounding and infrastructure supporting timeliness are essential components for consistency with this patient centered practice.

Objectives

The project aimed to improve patient satisfaction and safety through implementation of purposeful and timely nursing rounds. Goals for patient satisfaction scores and fall volume were set. Specific objectives were to determine current compliance with evidence-based criteria related to rounding times and protocols, improve best practice knowledge among staff nurses, and increase compliance with these criteria.

Methods

For the objectives of this project the Joanna Briggs Institute’s Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tools were used. Direct observation of staff nurses on a medical surgical unit in the United States was employed to assess timeliness and utilization of a protocol when rounding. Interventions were developed in response to baseline audit results. A follow-up audit was conducted to determine compliance with the same criteria. For the project aims, pre- and post-intervention unit-level data related to nursing-sensitive elements of patient satisfaction and safety were compared.

Results

Rounding frequency at specified intervals during awake and sleeping hours nearly doubled. Use of a rounding protocol increased substantially to 64% compliance from zero. Three elements of patient satisfaction had substantive rate increases but the hospital’s goals were not reached. Nurse communication and pain management scores increased modestly (5% and 11%, respectively). Responsiveness of hospital staff increased moderately (15%) with a significant sub-element increase in toileting (41%). Patient falls decreased by 50%.

Conclusions

Nurses have the ability to improve patient satisfaction and patient safety outcomes by utilizing nursing round interventions which serve to improve patient communication and staff responsiveness. Having a supportive infrastructure and an organized approach, encompassing all levels of staff, to meet patient needs during their hospital stay was a key factor for success. Hard-wiring of new practices related to workflow takes time as staff embrace change and understand how best practice interventions significantly improve patient outcomes.

Keywords:
Nursing Rounds; Patient Safety; Patient Satisfaction
Repository Posting Date:
6-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST312
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleNursing Rounds: A Best Practice Implementationen_US
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Julien
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Psien
dc.author.detailsJuli Daniels, PhD, CCRN, CNE, NEA-BC, LHRM, Professional Experience: Dr. Daniels is a leader in her community and a member of the following professional organizations: • American Nurses Association/Florida Nurses Association (ANA/FNA) • Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society (STTI) Virginia Henderson Fellow • American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) CCRN Item Writer 1997 - 2002. Excellence in Leadership Award 1998 • American Organization of Nursing Executives (AONE) Author Summary: Dr. Daniels has been an executive coach, mentor, and advocate for nurses across the United States, in the pursuit of clinical and administrative excellence. Dr. Daniels has been a nursing instructor for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs and served as the Evidence Synthesis Group (ESG) convenor by the Joanna Briggs Institute, Adelaide, Australia. Dr. Daniels has published in refereed journals nationally and internationally and has served as consultant for many academic and acute care organizations.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621435-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background</strong></p> <p><em></em>Purposeful and timely rounding is a best practice intervention to routinely meet patient care needs, ensure patient safety, decrease the occurrence of patient preventable events, and proactively address problems before they occur. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) endorsed hourly rounding as the best way to reduce call lights and fall injuries, and increase both quality of care and patient satisfaction. Nurse knowledge regarding purposeful rounding and infrastructure supporting timeliness are essential components for consistency with this patient centered practice.</p> <p><strong>Objectives</strong><em></em></p> <p>The project aimed to improve patient satisfaction and safety through implementation of purposeful and timely nursing rounds. Goals for patient satisfaction scores and fall volume were set. Specific objectives were to determine current compliance with evidence-based criteria related to rounding times and protocols, improve best practice knowledge among staff nurses, and increase compliance with these criteria.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong><em></em></p> <p>For the objectives of this project the Joanna Briggs Institute’s Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tools were used. Direct observation of staff nurses on a medical surgical unit in the United States was employed to assess timeliness and utilization of a protocol when rounding. Interventions were developed in response to baseline audit results. A follow-up audit was conducted to determine compliance with the same criteria. For the project aims, pre- and post-intervention unit-level data related to nursing-sensitive elements of patient satisfaction and safety were compared.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong><em></em></p> <p>Rounding frequency at specified intervals during awake and sleeping hours nearly doubled. Use of a rounding protocol increased substantially to 64% compliance from zero. Three elements of patient satisfaction had substantive rate increases but the hospital’s goals were not reached. Nurse communication and pain management scores increased modestly (5% and 11%, respectively). Responsiveness of hospital staff increased moderately (15%) with a significant sub-element increase in toileting (41%). Patient falls decreased by 50%.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions</strong><em></em></p> <p>Nurses have the ability to improve patient satisfaction and patient safety outcomes by utilizing nursing round interventions which serve to improve patient communication and staff responsiveness. Having a supportive infrastructure and an organized approach, encompassing all levels of staff, to meet patient needs during their hospital stay was a key factor for success. Hard-wiring of new practices related to workflow takes time as staff embrace change and understand how best practice interventions significantly improve patient outcomes.</p>en
dc.subjectNursing Roundsen
dc.subjectPatient Safetyen
dc.subjectPatient Satisfactionen
dc.date.available2017-06-06T19:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T19:29:40Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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