Using the "Kahoot.it" Game to Enhance Undergraduate Nursing Students' Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621457
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Using the "Kahoot.it" Game to Enhance Undergraduate Nursing Students' Learning
Other Titles:
Technology and Learning Strategies
Author(s):
Kurz, Jane M.; Kinder, Frances
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Kappa Delta
Author Details:
Jane M. Kurz, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse educator in undergraduate and graduate programs for more than 40 years.My area of clinical practice has been medical-surgical nursing. My research focuses on both families involved in heart or lung transplantation and educational issues. I have had many publications in peer-reviewed journal. I have served in leadership positions within the university and several professional organizations, e.g., AACN, Delaware Nurses Association, and ENRS. Author Summary: Dr. Kurz is Chair of the undergraduate program at LaSalle Uiversity. She teaches theory, research, and leadership courses for undergraduate and graduate students in nursing and interdisciplinary programs. Dr. Kurz’ publications and presentations have addressed many topics, such as end-of life education program evaluations, student learning, medical-surgical nursing, organ donation, and families’ involvement with heart-lung transplantation.
Abstract:

Gaming wasn’t formally included in nursing education until 75 years ago as an alternative to the traditional lecture method. Today, games as pedagogical platforms are becoming more popular in all areas of education.. These strategies engage the learner in a stimulating manner, appeal to many, and support learning. Individuals of different abilities can play together emphasizing participants’ strengths. Feedback is immediate. Group cohesiveness can develop as a result of peer cooperation and team interactions. Nevertheless, educators might be inclined not to use games for a variety of reasons. They tend to be noisy, chaotic and less controllable than lecture presentations. Producing a game and planning for potential problems is time-consuming and labor-intensive. There are articles that describe various games that an educator could use (Bensinger, 2015). However, there has been little research that lends support for game use in improving students’ knowledge level. One might ask the research question is: do undergraduate nursing students exposed to gaming in a nursing course have higher final exam scores than students who were not exposed to gaming. Although there are articles that describe various games, there are very few articles that provide empirical evidence to support use of games in the classroom (Davidson & Candy, 2016) . This quasi-experimental study addressed that gap.

Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore if the “kahoot.it “ game was associated with improved final exam scores with undergraduate nursing students. Kahoot.it is a free platform for learning that is engaging and fun. Players answer questions which are created by the faculty. They answer on their own devices and the lesson is shared on a screen in the classroom. Feedback is instant and the game is very competitive. Students can play in teams or as individuals. Adult Learning Theory provided the theoretical foundation for the use of gaming as a teaching strategy (Curran, 2014).

Methods: All 77 senior baccalaureate program students were enrolled in the required 15-week UG Nursing care of Children and Adolescent course. Students ranged in age from 20 to 22 years. All received the same lecture and class discussions but the research group (N=37) played Kahoot.it game in four 20 minute sessions during the semester. The control group (N=40) had no games during their classes. All students had the same final exam at the end of the semester.

Results:  Independent t-tests showed that the research group had higher test scores. (t=4.75, p=.01) than the control group.

Conclusion:  This study provided empirical evidence that gaming did make a significant difference in exam scores at the end of the course. Educators should incorporate this game strategy into their planned teaching modalities. Researchers should repeat this study with larger groups of students and test the number of games that need to be played within a single course to influence exam scores.

Keywords:
Games; Nursing education; Undergraduate Nursing Students
Repository Posting Date:
7-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
7-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17Q16
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleUsing the "Kahoot.it" Game to Enhance Undergraduate Nursing Students' Learningen_US
dc.title.alternativeTechnology and Learning Strategiesen
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Jane M.en
dc.contributor.authorKinder, Francesen
dc.contributor.departmentKappa Deltaen
dc.author.detailsJane M. Kurz, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse educator in undergraduate and graduate programs for more than 40 years.My area of clinical practice has been medical-surgical nursing. My research focuses on both families involved in heart or lung transplantation and educational issues. I have had many publications in peer-reviewed journal. I have served in leadership positions within the university and several professional organizations, e.g., AACN, Delaware Nurses Association, and ENRS. Author Summary: Dr. Kurz is Chair of the undergraduate program at LaSalle Uiversity. She teaches theory, research, and leadership courses for undergraduate and graduate students in nursing and interdisciplinary programs. Dr. Kurz’ publications and presentations have addressed many topics, such as end-of life education program evaluations, student learning, medical-surgical nursing, organ donation, and families’ involvement with heart-lung transplantation.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621457-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>Gaming wasn’t formally included in nursing education until 75 years ago as an alternative to the traditional lecture method. Today, games as pedagogical platforms are becoming more popular in all areas of education.. These strategies engage the learner in a stimulating manner, appeal to many, and support learning. Individuals of different abilities can play together emphasizing participants’ strengths. Feedback is immediate. Group cohesiveness can develop as a result of peer cooperation and team interactions. Nevertheless, educators might be inclined not to use games for a variety of reasons. They tend to be noisy, chaotic and less controllable than lecture presentations. Producing a game and planning for potential problems is time-consuming and labor-intensive. There are articles that describe various games that an educator could use (Bensinger, 2015). However, there has been little research that lends support for game use in improving students’ knowledge level. One might ask the research question is: do undergraduate nursing students exposed to gaming in a nursing course have higher final exam scores than students who were not exposed to gaming. Although there are articles that describe various games, there are very few articles that provide empirical evidence to support use of games in the classroom (Davidson & Candy, 2016) . This quasi-experimental study addressed that gap.</span></p> <p><strong>Purpose: </strong> The purpose of this study was to explore if the “<em>kahoot.it</em> “ game was associated with improved final exam scores with undergraduate nursing students. Kahoot.it is a free platform for learning that is engaging and fun. Players answer questions which are created by the faculty. They answer on their own devices and the lesson is shared on a screen in the classroom. Feedback is instant and the game is very competitive. Students can play in teams or as individuals. Adult Learning Theory provided the theoretical foundation for the use of gaming as a teaching strategy (Curran, 2014).</p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>All 77 senior baccalaureate program students were enrolled in the required 15-week UG Nursing care of Children and Adolescent course. Students ranged in age from 20 to 22 years. All received the same lecture and class discussions but the research group (N=37) played Kahoot.it game in four 20 minute sessions during the semester. The control group (N=40) had no games during their classes. All students had the same final exam at the end of the semester.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> Independent t-tests showed that the research group had higher test scores. (t=4.75, p=.01) than the control group.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong> This study provided empirical evidence that gaming did make a significant difference in exam scores at the end of the course. Educators should incorporate this game strategy into their planned teaching modalities. Researchers should repeat this study with larger groups of students and test the number of games that need to be played within a single course to influence exam scores.</p>en
dc.subjectGamesen
dc.subjectNursing educationen
dc.subjectUndergraduate Nursing Studentsen
dc.date.available2017-06-07T20:20:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-07-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T20:20:48Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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