Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621465
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Grounded Theory
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study
Author(s):
Rafii, Forough; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Nikravesh, Mansoure
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Abstract:

Background: Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout.

Methods: Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis.

Results: Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses.

Conclusions: The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.

Keywords:
Nursing Burnout; Nurses psychology
CINAHL Headings:
Burnout, Professional; Burnout, Professional--Psychosocial Factors; Nurse Attitudes; Nurse Attitudes--Iran; Perception; Perception--Evaluation; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Nursing Staff, Hospital--Iran; Burns--Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
8-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
13-Nov-2004
Version of Published Work:
Publisher's version
Citation:
Rafii, F., Oskouie, F., & Nikravesh, M. (2004). Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study. BMC Nursing, 3 (1) DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-6. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621465.
Publisher:
BioMed Central, Ltd.
Description:
FR initiated and designed the research, collected and analyzed the data and wrote the paper. FO was the main supervisor, helped in analysis, and revised and edited the drafts. MN was co- supervisor and revised the drafts. The authors thank Iran University of Medical Sciences for its financial support and Mrs. Minoo Maasoumi- the nursing administrator of Los Angeles Unified School District- for copy editing of this paper.
Note:
This item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Grounded Theoryen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleFactors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRafii, Foroughen
dc.contributor.authorOskouie, Fatemehen
dc.contributor.authorNikravesh, Mansoureen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621465-
dc.description.abstract<p> Background: Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout.</p> <p">Methods: Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis.</p> <p>Results: Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses.</p> <p>Conclusions: The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.</p>en
dc.subjectNursing Burnouten
dc.subjectNurses psychologyen
dc.subject.cinahlBurnout, Professionalen
dc.subject.cinahlBurnout, Professional--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudes--Iranen
dc.subject.cinahlPerceptionen
dc.subject.cinahlPerception--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Staff, Hospitalen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Staff, Hospital--Iranen
dc.subject.cinahlBurns--Nursingen
dc.date.available2017-06-08T15:13:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-11-13-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T15:13:16Z-
dc.type.versionPublisher's versionen
dc.identifier.citationRafii, F., Oskouie, F., & Nikravesh, M. (2004). Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study. BMC Nursing, 3 (1) DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-6. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621465.en
dc.publisherBioMed Central, Ltd.en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6955-
dc.identifier.issnBMC Nursing-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6955-3-6-
dc.identifier.citationRafii, F., Oskouie, F., & Nikravesh, M. (2004). Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study. BMC Nursing, 3 (1) DOI: 10.1186/1472-6955-3-6. Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621465.en
dc.descriptionFR initiated and designed the research, collected and analyzed the data and wrote the paper. FO was the main supervisor, helped in analysis, and revised and edited the drafts. MN was co- supervisor and revised the drafts. The authors thank Iran University of Medical Sciences for its financial support and Mrs. Minoo Maasoumi- the nursing administrator of Los Angeles Unified School District- for copy editing of this paper.en
dc.description.noteThis item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.-
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