Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621467
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology
Author(s):
Chan, Tom; Brew, Sarah; de Lusignan, Simon
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Abstract:

Background: In the UK the health service is investing more than ever before in information technology (IT) and primary care nurses will have to work with computers. Information about patients will be almost exclusively held in electronic patient records; and much of the information about best practice is most readily accessible via computer terminals. Objective: To examine the influence of age and nursing profession on the level of computer use. Methods: A questionnaire was developed to examine: access, training received, confidence and use of IT. The survey was carried out in a Sussex Primary Care Trust, in the UK. Results: The questionnaire was sent to 109 nurses with a 64% response rate. Most primary care nurses (89%) use their computer regularly at work: 100% of practice nurses daily, compared with 60% of district nurses and 59% of health visitors (p < 0.01). Access to IT was not significantly different between different age groups; but 91% of practice nurses had their own computer while many district nurses and health visitors had to share (p < 0.01). Nurses over 50 had received more training that their younger colleagues (p < 0.01); yet despite this, they lacked confidence and used computers less (p < 0.001). 96% of practice nurses were confident at in using computerised medical records, compared with 53% of district nurses and 44% of health visitors (p < 0.01.) One-to-one training and workshops were the preferred formats for training, with Internet based learning and printed manuals the least popular (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using computers in the surgery has become the norm for primary care nurses. However, nurses over 50, working out in the community, lack the confidence and skill of their younger and practice based colleagues.

Keywords:
nursing technology; electronic patient records; Silver Surfers
CINAHL Headings:
Information Technology; Information Technology--Utilization; Primary Health Care; Community Health Nursing; Nursing Role; Electronic Health Records; Computers and Computerization; Computers and Computerization--Utilization
Repository Posting Date:
8-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
7-Oct-2004
Version of Published Work:
Publisher's version
Citation:
Chan, T., Brew, S., de Lusignan, S. (2004). Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology. BMC Nursing 3 (1). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621467
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd.
Sponsors:
NHS Research Directorate
Description:
All authors conceived the study, and contributed to all aspects of the paper. The major contributions of each author is as follows: TC Analysed the data for the study, SB Recruited the nurses, sent out and collated the questionnaire, SdeL helped develop the questionnaire used in a earlier study and wrote the initial draft of the paper. Indi Munasinghe at CPHVA, and the information officer at RCN, for information about the age distribution of community nurses. This study was supported by KSSnet (Kent Surrey and Sussex Primary Care Research Network); in turn funded by the NHS Research Directorate.
Note:
This item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCommunity nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technologyen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Tomen
dc.contributor.authorBrew, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorde Lusignan, Simonen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621467-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: In the UK the health service is investing more than ever before in information technology (IT) and primary care nurses will have to work with computers. Information about patients will be almost exclusively held in electronic patient records; and much of the information about best practice is most readily accessible via computer terminals. Objective: To examine the influence of age and nursing profession on the level of computer use. Methods: A questionnaire was developed to examine: access, training received, confidence and use of IT. The survey was carried out in a Sussex Primary Care Trust, in the UK. Results: The questionnaire was sent to 109 nurses with a 64% response rate. Most primary care nurses (89%) use their computer regularly at work: 100% of practice nurses daily, compared with 60% of district nurses and 59% of health visitors (p < 0.01). Access to IT was not significantly different between different age groups; but 91% of practice nurses had their own computer while many district nurses and health visitors had to share (p < 0.01). Nurses over 50 had received more training that their younger colleagues (p < 0.01); yet despite this, they lacked confidence and used computers less (p < 0.001). 96% of practice nurses were confident at in using computerised medical records, compared with 53% of district nurses and 44% of health visitors (p < 0.01.) One-to-one training and workshops were the preferred formats for training, with Internet based learning and printed manuals the least popular (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using computers in the surgery has become the norm for primary care nurses. However, nurses over 50, working out in the community, lack the confidence and skill of their younger and practice based colleagues.</p>en
dc.subjectnursing technologyen
dc.subjectelectronic patient recordsen
dc.subjectSilver Surfersen
dc.subject.cinahlInformation Technologyen
dc.subject.cinahlInformation Technology--Utilizationen
dc.subject.cinahlPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.cinahlCommunity Health Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Roleen
dc.subject.cinahlElectronic Health Recordsen
dc.subject.cinahlComputers and Computerizationen
dc.subject.cinahlComputers and Computerization--Utilizationen
dc.date.available2017-06-08T19:22:55Z-
dc.date.issued2004-10-07-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T19:22:55Z-
dc.type.versionPublisher's versionen
dc.identifier.citationChan, T., Brew, S., de Lusignan, S. (2004). Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology. BMC Nursing 3 (1). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621467en
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6955-
dc.identifier.issnBMC Nursing-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6955-3-4-
dc.description.sponsorshipNHS Research Directorateen
dc.identifier.citationChan, T., Brew, S., de Lusignan, S. (2004). Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology. BMC Nursing 3 (1). Retrieved from http://www.nursinglibrary.org/vhl/handle/10755/621467en
dc.descriptionAll authors conceived the study, and contributed to all aspects of the paper. The major contributions of each author is as follows: TC Analysed the data for the study, SB Recruited the nurses, sent out and collated the questionnaire, SdeL helped develop the questionnaire used in a earlier study and wrote the initial draft of the paper. Indi Munasinghe at CPHVA, and the information officer at RCN, for information about the age distribution of community nurses. This study was supported by KSSnet (Kent Surrey and Sussex Primary Care Research Network); in turn funded by the NHS Research Directorate.en
dc.description.noteThis item appears in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by way of the author’s decision to publish with BMC Nursing, an open access journal, under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0. The license allows users to freely share and adapt the author’s material for any purpose, even commercially. Please refer to the attached license (the icon at the bottom of this entry) for further information and terms. All terms of the license have been followed. There are no changes in this article from the original posting. Neither STTI nor the Henderson Repository has any affiliation with BMC Nursing. Each shares only a mutual desire to distribute nursing research in an open access venue.-
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