Beliefs, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Spirituality: A Case Study of Homeless Women in Nevada

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621469
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Beliefs, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Spirituality: A Case Study of Homeless Women in Nevada
Other Titles:
Care of Minority Populations
Author(s):
Hurlbut, Jene' M.; Ditmyer, Marcia M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Sigma
Author Details:
Jene' M. Hurlbut, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse and nurse educator for over 25 years. This has included interacting and providing care for various vulnerable populations. For the last ten years I have worked directly with homeless populations located in the southwest portion of the United States in order to improve their health care outcomes. Currently I am employed as a Professor of Nursing and serve as the Veteran to BSN Director and Principal Investigator. Major responsibilities have included teaching in the following content and clinical areas: mental health nursing, nursing theory, nursing research, leadership, and community health. This program is an eighteen month accelerated BSN program that features the use of a block curriculum. Additional experience includes teaching on-line for the accelerated on-line component of the program. Author Summary: Dr. Jené Hurlbut has been a nurse and nurse educator for over 25 years and has interacted and provided care for various vulnerable populations during this time. This includes working with various homeless populations in order to improve their health care outcomes. She has published research findings related to the care of homeless women and this includes the impact of spirituality on the health of this marginalized population.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess the beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions of the meaning of spirituality in a cohort of sheltered homeless women in an urban area in southeast Nevada.

Methods:

Fourteen (14) personal interviews were conducted at a homeless shelter located in the southwest of the United States. Open-ended questions were used to allow respondents to answer questions in their own terms or in a manner that reflects their own attitudes, beliefs, and/or perceptions rather than those of the researcher. A process for categorization the data collected was used. Respondents agreed to be tape recorded for the purpose of data collection. Only aggregate data was used for purposes of reporting. The data was subsequently transcribed, and grouped in an effort to synthesize the data into identified patterns/themes. Once identified, the themes were then looked at to better determine the beliefs, attitudes and perceptions of respondents.

Results:

The convenience sample of women meeting the inclusion criteria interviewed ranged in age from 20-68 (M=46). A majority of the women in this sample had experienced homelessness 1-2 times and had been homeless for approximately 0-3 months. From the interviews five overarching themes emerged: 1) a belief in God or a higher power, 2) a distinction between religious beliefs and spirituality, 3) a belief that there is a plan for their life, 4) spirituality and beliefs provides guidance for what is “right” and what is “wrong”, and 5) a belief that their life will improve. In their descriptions of spirituality the women often shared stories and life experiences to illustrate their understanding of this concept.

Conclusion:

The findings of this study support the fundamental importance of spirituality in the lives of homeless women. Spirituality was acknowledged as providing hope and support and the ability to improve health and well-being. Implications from this study can help healthcare professionals to design interventions that support spiritual practices and perhaps lessen the negative impact of homelessness for these women. Moreover, healthcare professionals need to become comfortable in addressing the spiritual needs of clients, in doing so this will improve the holistic care that is provided to this marginalized and vulnerable population. During a time when rates of homeless for women have increased, further research is needed to explicate the meaning of spirituality and how this impacts their overall resiliency and health.

Keywords:
Homeless; Spirituality; Women
Repository Posting Date:
12-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
12-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B13
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleBeliefs, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Spirituality: A Case Study of Homeless Women in Nevadaen_US
dc.title.alternativeCare of Minority Populationsen
dc.contributor.authorHurlbut, Jene' M.en
dc.contributor.authorDitmyer, Marcia M.en
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsJene' M. Hurlbut, PhD, RN, CNE, Professional Experience: I have been a nurse and nurse educator for over 25 years. This has included interacting and providing care for various vulnerable populations. For the last ten years I have worked directly with homeless populations located in the southwest portion of the United States in order to improve their health care outcomes. Currently I am employed as a Professor of Nursing and serve as the Veteran to BSN Director and Principal Investigator. Major responsibilities have included teaching in the following content and clinical areas: mental health nursing, nursing theory, nursing research, leadership, and community health. This program is an eighteen month accelerated BSN program that features the use of a block curriculum. Additional experience includes teaching on-line for the accelerated on-line component of the program. Author Summary: Dr. Jené Hurlbut has been a nurse and nurse educator for over 25 years and has interacted and provided care for various vulnerable populations during this time. This includes working with various homeless populations in order to improve their health care outcomes. She has published research findings related to the care of homeless women and this includes the impact of spirituality on the health of this marginalized population.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621469-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess the beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions of the meaning of spirituality in a cohort of sheltered homeless women in an urban area in southeast Nevada.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>Fourteen (14) personal interviews were conducted at a homeless shelter located in the southwest of the United States. Open-ended questions were used to allow respondents to answer questions in their own terms or in a manner that reflects their own attitudes, beliefs, and/or perceptions rather than those of the researcher. A process for categorization the data collected was used. Respondents agreed to be tape recorded for the purpose of data collection. Only aggregate data was used for purposes of reporting. The data was subsequently transcribed, and grouped in an effort to synthesize the data into identified patterns/themes. Once identified, the themes were then looked at to better determine the beliefs, attitudes and perceptions of respondents.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>The convenience sample of women meeting the inclusion criteria interviewed ranged in age from 20-68 (M=46). A majority of the women in this sample had experienced homelessness 1-2 times and had been homeless for approximately 0-3 months. From the interviews five overarching themes emerged: 1) a belief in God or a higher power, 2) a distinction between religious beliefs and spirituality, 3) a belief that there is a plan for their life, 4) spirituality and beliefs provides guidance for what is “right” and what is “wrong”, and 5) a belief that their life will improve. In their descriptions of spirituality the women often shared stories and life experiences to illustrate their understanding of this concept.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>The findings of this study support the fundamental importance of spirituality in the lives of homeless women. Spirituality was acknowledged as providing hope and support and the ability to improve health and well-being. Implications from this study can help healthcare professionals to design interventions that support spiritual practices and perhaps lessen the negative impact of homelessness for these women. Moreover, healthcare professionals need to become comfortable in addressing the spiritual needs of clients, in doing so this will improve the holistic care that is provided to this marginalized and vulnerable population. During a time when rates of homeless for women have increased, further research is needed to explicate the meaning of spirituality and how this impacts their overall resiliency and health.</p>en
dc.subjectHomelessen
dc.subjectSpiritualityen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.date.available2017-06-12T19:02:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-12-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-12T19:02:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.