Improving Care for the Veteran Population Through Respectful Interprofessional Collaboration: One College's Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621489
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Improving Care for the Veteran Population Through Respectful Interprofessional Collaboration: One College's Experience
Author(s):
Connor, Susan B.; Byrne, Paula
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Xi
Author Details:
Paula Byrne, DNP, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Byrne is the Chair of Traditional Nursing at The College of St. Scholastica. A graduate from the University of Minnesota with a B.S.N., her first work was in Indian Health Services with Inupiat Eskimos in Kotzebue, Alaska. Upon return to the lower 48, she held positions in critical access hospitals that included work in Intensive Care, Hospice, Public Health and Home Health. When leading an initial Joint Commission’s accreditation survey for home health, she discovered her love of teaching nurses to become leaders in healthcare teams. She received a M.S.N. from the University of Phoenix and interspersed studies with frequent trips to China, Europe, Africa, Philippines, South America, British Isles, and Scandinavian countries. She has led multiple international student immersion trips designed to help students explore different healthcare delivery models. She completed her Doctorate work at St. Catherine's University with a focus on emerging disruptive technology and informatics. Author Summary: Dr. Byrne is interested in the intersection between technology and caring as it relates to nursing workflow. Her experience with nursing education, curricula development and passion for international travel keep her engaged with shaping how pre-licensure nurses value cultural awareness and global health. She is currently an Associate Professor and Chair in the School of Nursing at The College of St. Scholastica.
Abstract:

Purpose:

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a novel educational offering on the interprofessional knowledge and attitudes related to health care of the rural veteran. With roots back in the 1960s, the interprofessional education (IPE) movement did not become energized in the United States until 2009 when six national education associations of schools of the health professions formed the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) followed in 2010 when the World Health Organization’s (WHO) proposed a global framework for implementing IPE and collaborative practice. Yet, Bankston and Glazer (2013) and even the American Nurses Association (2013) ponder why despite concerted efforts by some institutions of higher learning and healthcare systems, many future health care providers are not educated to provide cost-effective, patient centered coordinated care as part of an integrated team. Challenged by resource shortages, many smaller colleges continue to funnel future health care students through fast-paced, highly technical, and specialty focused curricula or silos. However, as Hudson, Sanders and Pepper (2013) detailed, there is only a limited amount of evidence to help nursing educators break these silos and enrich the future practice of nursing students.

Methods:

Spearheaded by the school of nursing, a modular program of study was developed based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) core competencies and focused on the veteran population. In order to include different disciplines into this nursing-centric course, four free standing modules were developed that focused on ethics, roles, communication, and teamwork. This design enabled the various disciplines to schedule their students around their discipline-specific calendars, space, credit, and grading requirements. Students from The College’s Health Sciences (e.g., health informatics, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and social work) attended the course as their clinical rotations allowed. In each class there was a mixture of student health care professions. Nursing was the only constant group throughout the course. Using the veteran population as exemplars throughout each module helped to generate active interprofessional classroom experiences and bridge educational silos. Each module offered didactic, group activities focused on shared interprofessional values, collaboration and evidence-based practice, complex interprofessional simulation and case studies, and guest speakers from the veteran community. Course work was patient/client centric and did not emphasize any one particular profession. Measurements of interprofessional knowledge and attitudes were used to determine the impact of the education program. Attitudes were assessed before and following each 15 week course.

Results:

Ninety-eight students completed the first set of pre- and post-surveys. Preliminary findings suggest that education grounded in Benedictine values at a liberal arts college and tailored to the needs of a large rural population of veterans resulted in increased attitudes toward ethical components of teamwork and improved knowledge of and communication with various health professionals and veterans related to healthcare. The attitudes that significantly improved were related to collaboration. Attitudes related to professional ethics and values were unchanged. Course evaluations and student reflections exemplify the importance of respectful collaboration. As an unintended result, many of the health clinics where students worked added a question about uniformed service on their health history forms. Due to student feedback, enthusiasm and interest in continuing this course grew.

Conclusion:

IPE and respectful collaboration is the future of healthcare. The state of the science is limited for educators interested in developing curricula to help future health care professionals collaborate with patients and their families to cut cost, improve their health experience as well as their overall health as outlined in the Triple Aim (2016). This unique educational experience will add to the literature and may inform future IPE curriculum development at smaller institutions challenged by costs, credit loads, and faculty availability.

Keywords:
Interprofessional Education; Pre-Licensure Nursing Education; Veteran Population
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST80
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleImproving Care for the Veteran Population Through Respectful Interprofessional Collaboration: One College's Experienceen_US
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Susan B.en
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Paulaen
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Xien
dc.author.detailsPaula Byrne, DNP, RN, Professional Experience: Dr. Byrne is the Chair of Traditional Nursing at The College of St. Scholastica. A graduate from the University of Minnesota with a B.S.N., her first work was in Indian Health Services with Inupiat Eskimos in Kotzebue, Alaska. Upon return to the lower 48, she held positions in critical access hospitals that included work in Intensive Care, Hospice, Public Health and Home Health. When leading an initial Joint Commission’s accreditation survey for home health, she discovered her love of teaching nurses to become leaders in healthcare teams. She received a M.S.N. from the University of Phoenix and interspersed studies with frequent trips to China, Europe, Africa, Philippines, South America, British Isles, and Scandinavian countries. She has led multiple international student immersion trips designed to help students explore different healthcare delivery models. She completed her Doctorate work at St. Catherine's University with a focus on emerging disruptive technology and informatics. Author Summary: Dr. Byrne is interested in the intersection between technology and caring as it relates to nursing workflow. Her experience with nursing education, curricula development and passion for international travel keep her engaged with shaping how pre-licensure nurses value cultural awareness and global health. She is currently an Associate Professor and Chair in the School of Nursing at The College of St. Scholastica.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621489-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose:</strong></p> <p>The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a novel educational offering on the interprofessional knowledge and attitudes related to health care of the rural veteran. With roots back in the 1960s, the interprofessional education (IPE) movement did not become energized in the United States until 2009 when six national education associations of schools of the health professions formed the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) followed in 2010 when the World Health Organization’s (WHO) proposed a global framework for implementing IPE and collaborative practice. Yet, Bankston and Glazer (2013) and even the American Nurses Association (2013) ponder why despite concerted efforts by some institutions of higher learning and healthcare systems, many future health care providers are not educated to provide cost-effective, patient centered coordinated care as part of an integrated team. Challenged by resource shortages, many smaller colleges continue to funnel future health care students through fast-paced, highly technical, and specialty focused curricula or silos. However, as Hudson, Sanders and Pepper (2013) detailed, there is only a limited amount of evidence to help nursing educators break these silos and enrich the future practice of nursing students.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong></p> <p>Spearheaded by the school of nursing, a modular program of study was developed based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) core competencies and focused on the veteran population. In order to include different disciplines into this nursing-centric course, four free standing modules were developed that focused on ethics, roles, communication, and teamwork. This design enabled the various disciplines to schedule their students around their discipline-specific calendars, space, credit, and grading requirements. Students from The College’s Health Sciences (e.g., health informatics, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and social work) attended the course as their clinical rotations allowed. In each class there was a mixture of student health care professions. Nursing was the only constant group throughout the course. Using the veteran population as exemplars throughout each module helped to generate active interprofessional classroom experiences and bridge educational silos. Each module offered didactic, group activities focused on shared interprofessional values, collaboration and evidence-based practice, complex interprofessional simulation and case studies, and guest speakers from the veteran community. Course work was patient/client centric and did not emphasize any one particular profession. Measurements of interprofessional knowledge and attitudes were used to determine the impact of the education program. Attitudes were assessed before and following each 15 week course.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong></p> <p>Ninety-eight students completed the first set of pre- and post-surveys. Preliminary findings suggest that education grounded in Benedictine values at a liberal arts college and tailored to the needs of a large rural population of veterans resulted in increased attitudes toward ethical components of teamwork and improved knowledge of and communication with various health professionals and veterans related to healthcare. The attitudes that significantly improved were related to collaboration. Attitudes related to professional ethics and values were unchanged. Course evaluations and student reflections exemplify the importance of respectful collaboration. As an unintended result, many of the health clinics where students worked added a question about uniformed service on their health history forms. Due to student feedback, enthusiasm and interest in continuing this course grew.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong></p> <p>IPE and respectful collaboration is the future of healthcare. The state of the science is limited for educators interested in developing curricula to help future health care professionals collaborate with patients and their families to cut cost, improve their health experience as well as their overall health as outlined in the Triple Aim (2016). This unique educational experience will add to the literature and may inform future IPE curriculum development at smaller institutions challenged by costs, credit loads, and faculty availability.</p>en
dc.subjectInterprofessional Educationen
dc.subjectPre-Licensure Nursing Educationen
dc.subjectVeteran Populationen
dc.date.available2017-06-14T14:50:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T14:50:11Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.