2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621494
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Nursing and Physical Therapy Students Learning and Collaborating Together
Other Titles:
Interprofessional Education Collaborations
Author(s):
Francis, Mary; Wellmon, Robert; Lefebvre, Kristin; Erdman, Ellen
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Beta
Author Details:
Mary Francis, PhD, RN, NP-BC, Professional Experience: I have been undergraduate nurses for 24 years. I recently in the past 3 years have also begun teaching graduate nurses. I also work as an acute care trauma nurse practitioner at a level one trauma center in Camden, NJ. Population of trauma patient has many penetrating as well as blunt trauma injuries. Author Summary: Mary Francis as worked as a nursing educator for over 20 years and a trauma nurse practitioner for over 10 years. She values team work in the clinical setting and believes collaboration and inter professional learning should begin in school.
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine student's attitudes and beliefs regarding interprofessional learning (IPL) and collaboration (IPC) following an interprofessional transfer laboratory experience. The study also explored student's perception of professional identity and self-efficacy.

Methods: Forty-nine doctorate of physical therapy (DPT) students and 136 baccalaureate student nurses (BSN) were assigned into groups of 1 DPT and 2-3 BSN students. One week prior to the laboratory experience, the students attended a lecture discussing how to transfer a patient and the importance of mobility during a hospitalization. The lecture focused on the clinic decision making involved in deciding how to transferring a patient, the hazards of immobility for a patient, and the body mechanics involved in actually moving a patient. The student's expectations for the mobility lab were reviewed at this time. During the laboratory experience, five different clinical scenarios were provided to the students to allow them multiple opportunities to practice transferring a patient out of bed into a chair (variations included different weightbearing statuses, diagnoses and devices). The laboratory experience was scheduled for 90 minutes. Immediately following the laboratory experience all students participated in a 30-minute debriefing that included various DPT and BSN subgroups. Surveys were sent to participants one week prior to the experience to collect pre-experience data. Students completed their post- survey immediately following the debriefing. Valid and reliable measures of IPC and IPL were used to collect data. Measures included the Interprofessional Education Perspective Scale (IEPS), the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning scale (RIPLS), the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Teams Scale (ATHTS), the Confidence for Interprofessional Learning and Cooperation scale (CILC), and the Self-Efficacy for Experiential Learning (SEEL). ANOVA and paired sample T tests were performed using SPSS 21.0 to measure between and within group differences arising as a result of the experience.

Results: DPT and BSN students showed significant improvements in competency and autonomy (p<.002), perceived need for cooperation (p<.005), perception of actual cooperation (p<.003) as measured by the IEPS. In addition, student showed a significant improvement in team work and collaboration (p<.001) and professional identity (p<.001) as measured by the RIPLS. The ATHTS showed significant findings around improvements in team value (p<.001) and team efficiency (p<.001) and finally several items of the SEEL showed significant improvements around student perceptions of self efficacy (p<.001).

Conclusion: Study participants reported improvement in domains identified in the literature as important to interprofessional learning and collaboration following an interprofessional transfer laboratory experience. Areas of greatest improvement included student’s perceptions of self-efficacy, team work, team value, team efficiency, competency and autonomy. Student's perceptions described during the debriefing were a new self-awareness of mobility skills and their ability to convey instructions to others. Students appreciated the opportunity to work with another discipline and felt it increased their understanding of professional roles.

Keywords:
Interprofessional; Collaboration; Identity
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B10
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleNursing and Physical Therapy Students Learning and Collaborating Togetheren_US
dc.title.alternativeInterprofessional Education Collaborationsen
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorWellmon, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorLefebvre, Kristinen
dc.contributor.authorErdman, Ellenen
dc.contributor.departmentEta Betaen
dc.author.detailsMary Francis, PhD, RN, NP-BC, Professional Experience: I have been undergraduate nurses for 24 years. I recently in the past 3 years have also begun teaching graduate nurses. I also work as an acute care trauma nurse practitioner at a level one trauma center in Camden, NJ. Population of trauma patient has many penetrating as well as blunt trauma injuries. Author Summary: Mary Francis as worked as a nursing educator for over 20 years and a trauma nurse practitioner for over 10 years. She values team work in the clinical setting and believes collaboration and inter professional learning should begin in school.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621494-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>The purpose of this study was to examine student's attitudes and beliefs regarding interprofessional learning (IPL) and collaboration (IPC) following an interprofessional transfer laboratory experience. The study also explored student's perception of professional identity and self-efficacy.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>Forty-nine doctorate of physical therapy (DPT) students and 136 baccalaureate student nurses (BSN) were assigned into groups of 1 DPT and 2-3 BSN students. One week prior to the laboratory experience, the students attended a lecture discussing how to transfer a patient and the importance of mobility during a hospitalization. The lecture focused on the clinic decision making involved in deciding how to transferring a patient, the hazards of immobility for a patient, and the body mechanics involved in actually moving a patient. The student's expectations for the mobility lab were reviewed at this time. During the laboratory experience, five different clinical scenarios were provided to the students to allow them multiple opportunities to practice transferring a patient out of bed into a chair (variations included different weightbearing statuses, diagnoses and devices). The laboratory experience was scheduled for 90 minutes. Immediately following the laboratory experience all students participated in a 30-minute debriefing that included various DPT and BSN subgroups. Surveys were sent to participants one week prior to the experience to collect pre-experience data. Students completed their post- survey immediately following the debriefing. Valid and reliable measures of IPC and IPL were used to collect data. Measures included the Interprofessional Education Perspective Scale (IEPS), the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning scale (RIPLS), the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Teams Scale (ATHTS), the Confidence for Interprofessional Learning and Cooperation scale (CILC), and the Self-Efficacy for Experiential Learning (SEEL). ANOVA and paired sample T tests were performed using SPSS 21.0 to measure between and within group differences arising as a result of the experience.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong>DPT and BSN students showed significant improvements in competency and autonomy (p<.002), perceived need for cooperation (p<.005), perception of actual cooperation (p<.003) as measured by the IEPS. In addition, student showed a significant improvement in team work and collaboration (p<.001) and professional identity (p<.001) as measured by the RIPLS. The ATHTS showed significant findings around improvements in team value (p<.001) and team efficiency (p<.001) and finally several items of the SEEL showed significant improvements around student perceptions of self efficacy (p<.001).</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Study participants reported improvement in domains identified in the literature as important to interprofessional learning and collaboration following an interprofessional transfer laboratory experience. Areas of greatest improvement included student’s perceptions of self-efficacy, team work, team value, team efficiency, competency and autonomy. Student's perceptions described during the debriefing were a new self-awareness of mobility skills and their ability to convey instructions to others. Students appreciated the opportunity to work with another discipline and felt it increased their understanding of professional roles.</p>en
dc.subjectInterprofessionalen
dc.subjectCollaborationen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.date.available2017-06-14T20:02:08Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T20:02:08Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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