2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621497
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Embedding a Clinical Therapist as Staff Into a Faculty/School of Nursing
Other Titles:
Nursing Student Support Strategies
Author(s):
Patrick, Linda J.; Carty, Laurie M.; Inayatulla, Sheema J.; Verkoeyen, Katelyn J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Upsilon Tau
Author Details:
Linda J. Patrick, PhD, MSc, MA, BScN, RN, Professional Experience: 1974- present- Registered Nurse in Ontario, Canada 1989 - present - Academic positions in both college and university programs of nursing. Roles have included 1) faculty; 2) Curriculum coordinator; 3) Undergraduate program coordinator; 4) Associate Dean (2007-2010) and 5) Dean (2010- present) at a Canadian University. 1974-1989 - Staff nurse positions in both acute care and community settings including being a Diabetes Educator. Responsible for publications in peer reviewed journals and a nursing fundamentals textbook with 3 other editors published in 2015 titled; Fundamentals: Perspectives on the Art and Science of Canadian Nursing. Program of research has evolved with changing roles in academia. Recent research has included using a mixed methods approach to exploring the mentorship needs of new tenure track faculty in academic settings and exploring upward violence directed towards leaders in academic and clinical settings. Numerous presentations at scientific meetings. Author Summary: Dr. Patrick has been a nurse educator for 27 years in both college and university settings. She began her tenure as the Dean of Nursing at the University of Windsor in 2010. Prior to becoming Dean, she held the positions of Associate Dean and Undergraduate Coordinator. Dr. Patrick is passionate about creating healthy work and learning environments, fostering a just culture and promoting the mental health of all students, faculty and staff.
Abstract:

The mental health of post-secondary students on college and university campuses has received considerable media attention especially when harm to self or others is the outcome. Nursing students are not immune to psychological distress and mental illness (Stallman & Shochet, 2009). Compared to the majority of post-secondary students, nursing students reportedly have a higher risk of mental health difficulties including excessive stress, anxiety and depression that can lead to poor health outcomes (Chernomas & Shapiro, 2013; Fitzgerald, 2015). There are many campus wide resources for students to access at their respective institutions, but they are often unwilling to voluntarily seek counselling during periods of escalating stress and anxiety. According to Galbraith et al., they prefer instead to confide in friends and family (2014). This avoidance behavior was described by Goff (2011) as possibly due to the perception that accessing services is a sign of weakness or inability to cope with the requirements of being a nurse. Our experience has included students revealing ineffective coping skills and mental health related issues to clinical and theory teachers when unsuccessful in a course. Instructors struggle with separating academic advising from emotional support during a student crisis. In severe cases, intervention includes walking a distraught student to counseling services across campus for fear that they would harm themselves. Additionally, faculty voice frustration with delays in assessment and interventions by external therapists to allow students to have a timely return to their studies. The inability to provide a smooth transition back to clinical in particular resulted in higher attrition rates and delayed completion of the nursing program. In 2012, a part-time clinical therapist was hired as a permanent staff position in our Faculty of Nursing. Students self-refer to the therapist or are referred by our academic advisor or faculty. The addition of a clinical therapist to our team has led to our students receiving timely and often pre-emptive counseling for issues related to both personal and academic stress. Outcomes include decreased attrition rates across all four years of the baccalaureate program and an enhanced student experience.

Keywords:
Academic Success; Mental Health; Nursing Students
Repository Posting Date:
14-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17C03
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEmbedding a Clinical Therapist as Staff Into a Faculty/School of Nursingen_US
dc.title.alternativeNursing Student Support Strategiesen
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, Linda J.en
dc.contributor.authorCarty, Laurie M.en
dc.contributor.authorInayatulla, Sheema J.en
dc.contributor.authorVerkoeyen, Katelyn J.en
dc.contributor.departmentUpsilon Tauen
dc.author.detailsLinda J. Patrick, PhD, MSc, MA, BScN, RN, Professional Experience: 1974- present- Registered Nurse in Ontario, Canada 1989 - present - Academic positions in both college and university programs of nursing. Roles have included 1) faculty; 2) Curriculum coordinator; 3) Undergraduate program coordinator; 4) Associate Dean (2007-2010) and 5) Dean (2010- present) at a Canadian University. 1974-1989 - Staff nurse positions in both acute care and community settings including being a Diabetes Educator. Responsible for publications in peer reviewed journals and a nursing fundamentals textbook with 3 other editors published in 2015 titled; Fundamentals: Perspectives on the Art and Science of Canadian Nursing. Program of research has evolved with changing roles in academia. Recent research has included using a mixed methods approach to exploring the mentorship needs of new tenure track faculty in academic settings and exploring upward violence directed towards leaders in academic and clinical settings. Numerous presentations at scientific meetings. Author Summary: Dr. Patrick has been a nurse educator for 27 years in both college and university settings. She began her tenure as the Dean of Nursing at the University of Windsor in 2010. Prior to becoming Dean, she held the positions of Associate Dean and Undergraduate Coordinator. Dr. Patrick is passionate about creating healthy work and learning environments, fostering a just culture and promoting the mental health of all students, faculty and staff.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621497-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The mental health of post-secondary students on college and university campuses has received considerable media attention especially when harm to self or others is the outcome. Nursing students are not immune to psychological distress and mental illness (Stallman & Shochet, 2009). Compared to the majority of post-secondary students, nursing students reportedly have a higher risk of mental health difficulties including excessive stress, anxiety and depression that can lead to poor health outcomes (Chernomas & Shapiro, 2013; Fitzgerald, 2015). There are many campus wide resources for students to access at their respective institutions, but they are often unwilling to voluntarily seek counselling during periods of escalating stress and anxiety. According to Galbraith et al., they prefer instead to confide in friends and family (2014). This avoidance behavior was described by Goff (2011) as possibly due to the perception that accessing services is a sign of weakness or inability to cope with the requirements of being a nurse. Our experience has included students revealing ineffective coping skills and mental health related issues to clinical and theory teachers when unsuccessful in a course. Instructors struggle with separating academic advising from emotional support during a student crisis. In severe cases, intervention includes walking a distraught student to counseling services across campus for fear that they would harm themselves. Additionally, faculty voice frustration with delays in assessment and interventions by external therapists to allow students to have a timely return to their studies. The inability to provide a smooth transition back to clinical in particular resulted in higher attrition rates and delayed completion of the nursing program. In 2012, a part-time clinical therapist was hired as a permanent staff position in our Faculty of Nursing. Students self-refer to the therapist or are referred by our academic advisor or faculty. The addition of a clinical therapist to our team has led to our students receiving timely and often pre-emptive counseling for issues related to both personal and academic stress. Outcomes include decreased attrition rates across all four years of the baccalaureate program and an enhanced student experience.</span></p>en
dc.subjectAcademic Successen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectNursing Studentsen
dc.date.available2017-06-14T20:27:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T20:27:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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