Comparisons of Cardiometabolic Risk Between African American and Caucasian Women in a Worksite Wellness Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621515
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Comparisons of Cardiometabolic Risk Between African American and Caucasian Women in a Worksite Wellness Program
Other Titles:
Quality of Life in Cardiac Patients
Author(s):
Graves, Barbara Ann; Appel, Susan J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Omega
Author Details:
Barbara Ann Graves, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2012-present -- Associate Professor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 2008-2012 -- Assistant Professor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 2003-07--Instrustor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Responsible for development, communication and online instruction for graduate nursing courses (2012-present). Responsible for development, course coordination, classroom and clinical instruction, and testing for undergraduate complex client courses and evidence-based practice courses. EBP mentor for integration of EBP through the undergraduate nursing courses(2008-2012). Author Summary: Ann Graves is an associate professor in the Capstone College of Nursing at the University of Alabama and is a PhD prepared registered nurse who holds a doctorate in Clinical Health Sciences. As a nurse-scientist with extensive experience in practice and teaching in the areas of critical care nursing, cardiovascular nursing, and evidence-based nursing practice, she has focused her program of research on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cardiometabolic risk reduction.
Abstract:

Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and chronic illness in the US. The burden of CVD is substantial in terms of mortality, disability, and cost. More than 82 million Americans have some type of CVD.1 Total direct medical costs are projected to triple, from $273 to $818 billion, between 2010 and 2030.2 More women die from CVD than men, but still represent an under-researched population.3-5 Africian-American women experience some of the highest age-adjusted prevalence rates for heart attack, stroke, hypertension, and diabetes. The purpose of the research study was to compare CMR or the interplay of risk for diabetes leading to heart disease, between African-American and Caucasian women.

Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to compare CMR variables in 50 women (25 African-American and 25 Caucasian) participants in a worksite wellness program. CMR profile data was obtained that included: 1) blood levels of fasting insulin and glucose (blood sugar), hemoglobin A1c (risk for diabetes), C-reactive protein (inflammation), 2) acanthosis nigricans scoring (darkened skin on the neck as risk for diabetes) and 3) Measures of body habitus (weight, height and waist circumference). A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to compare African American and Caucasian participants on the CMR variables while controlling for age and BMI. A regression analysis using a stepwise procedure was also used to determine which CMR measures were the best predictors of insulin resistance.

Results:  There was a significant multivariate main effect of race, Wilks’ Λ = .58, F (10, 32) = 2.28, = .04, suggesting that there were significant differences between African American and Caucasian participants on measures of CMR. Stepwise regression analysis further revealed that the overall model was significant, R2 = .57, (6, 38) = 8.36, < .001 for predicting insulin resistance. The analysis further indicating that BMI, fasting triglycerides, fasting HDL, and fasting hemoglobin A1c were significant predictors of insulin resistance.

Conclusion: Findings from this study provide valuable insights to guide the development of specific interventions to reduce CMR among understudied women in general. More specifically, findings inform how to tailor interventions among African-American women, as risks for heart disease and stroke have been found to differ by both gender and race.

Keywords:
cardiometabolic risk; cardiovascular disease; worksite wellness
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
16-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17B15
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleComparisons of Cardiometabolic Risk Between African American and Caucasian Women in a Worksite Wellness Programen_US
dc.title.alternativeQuality of Life in Cardiac Patientsen
dc.contributor.authorGraves, Barbara Annen
dc.contributor.authorAppel, Susan J.en
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Omegaen
dc.author.detailsBarbara Ann Graves, PhD, RN, Professional Experience: 2012-present -- Associate Professor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 2008-2012 -- Assistant Professor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 2003-07--Instrustor, Capstone College of Nursing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Responsible for development, communication and online instruction for graduate nursing courses (2012-present). Responsible for development, course coordination, classroom and clinical instruction, and testing for undergraduate complex client courses and evidence-based practice courses. EBP mentor for integration of EBP through the undergraduate nursing courses(2008-2012). Author Summary: Ann Graves is an associate professor in the Capstone College of Nursing at the University of Alabama and is a PhD prepared registered nurse who holds a doctorate in Clinical Health Sciences. As a nurse-scientist with extensive experience in practice and teaching in the areas of critical care nursing, cardiovascular nursing, and evidence-based nursing practice, she has focused her program of research on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cardiometabolic risk reduction.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621515-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose: </strong><span>Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and chronic illness in the US. The burden of CVD is substantial in terms of mortality, disability, and cost. More than 82 million Americans have some type of CVD.</span><sup>1</sup><span> Total direct medical costs are projected to triple, from $273 to $818 billion, between 2010 and 2030.</span><sup>2</sup><span> More women die from CVD than men, but still represent an under-researched population.</span><sup>3-5</sup><span> Africian-American women experience some of the highest age-adjusted prevalence rates for heart attack, stroke, hypertension, and diabetes. The purpose of the research study was to compare CMR or the interplay of risk for diabetes leading to heart disease, between African-American and Caucasian women.</span></p> <p><strong>Methods: </strong>A cross-sectional design was used to compare CMR variables in 50 women (25 African-American and 25 Caucasian) participants in a worksite wellness program. CMR profile data was obtained that included: 1) blood levels of fasting insulin and glucose (blood sugar), hemoglobin A1c (risk for diabetes), C-reactive protein (inflammation), 2) acanthosis nigricans scoring (darkened skin on the neck as risk for diabetes) and 3) Measures of body habitus (weight, height and waist circumference). A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to compare African American and Caucasian participants on the CMR variables while controlling for age and BMI. A regression analysis using a stepwise procedure was also used to determine which CMR measures were the best predictors of insulin resistance.</p> <p><strong>Results: </strong> There was a significant multivariate main effect of race, Wilks’ Λ = .58, <em>F</em> (10, 32) = 2.28, <em>p </em>= .04, suggesting that there were significant differences between African American and Caucasian participants on measures of CMR. Stepwise regression analysis further revealed that the overall model was significant, <em>R</em><sup>2</sup> = .57, <em>F </em>(6, 38) = 8.36, <em>p </em>< .001 for predicting insulin resistance. The analysis further indicating that BMI, fasting triglycerides, fasting HDL, and fasting hemoglobin A1c were significant predictors of insulin resistance.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Findings from this study provide valuable insights to guide the development of specific interventions to reduce CMR among understudied women in general. More specifically, findings inform how to tailor interventions among African-American women, as risks for heart disease and stroke have been found to differ by both gender and race.</p>en
dc.subjectcardiometabolic risken
dc.subjectcardiovascular diseaseen
dc.subjectworksite wellnessen
dc.date.available2017-06-16T20:51:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-16-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-16T20:51:56Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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