Self-Leadership in Male Learner Nurses during Their Training at a College in South Africa

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621546
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Self-Leadership in Male Learner Nurses during Their Training at a College in South Africa
Other Titles:
Education Strategies in Academia
Author(s):
Mia, Shahnaaz
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Tau
Author Details:
Shahnaaz Mia, MCur, RN, RM, Professional Experience: Clinical Educator/Mentor July 2008 –June 2015 Occupational Health Nursing Practitioner November 2004- June 2008 Field Supervisor 2004 Previously employed at the local authority for the City of Cape Town from 01/10/84- 31/05/2001 as a Senior Professional Nurse in Charg Author Summary: Currently, lecturing at the University of the Western Cape. Portfolio of clinical co-ordination 1st year students Clinical supervision 7 years at the Western Cape College of Nursing for 2nd, 3rd and 4th year diploma students Community nursing. 3 and a half years OHNP at a beverage manufacturing plant. Sister in charge in community health clinics in township areas "the Cape Flats"
Abstract:

Male learners in the nursing profession have been found to face self-leadership challenges. Self-leadership is an enabling process whereby a people learn to know themselves better and through this improved self-awareness, are better able to steer their work life. Self-leadership includes both personal and professional growth. It requires certain attributes such as maturity and endurance. This leads to the empowerment of the individual and to the fulfillment of goals and desires. The purpose of this study was to describe guidelines for male learner nurses on self-leadership during a four-year nursing programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape.

The objectives of this study were to explore and describe the best experiences of self-leadership in male learner nurses during their four-year training programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape Province of the Republic of South Africa.

A qualitative research design incorporating the philosophy of the Appreciative Inquiry paradigm was used. The research design was exploratory, descriptive and contextual to match the research questions.

The research questions were framed from an AI perspective:

‘What are the best experiences of male learner nurses on their self-leadership during their four-year programme?’

‘How can male learner nurses lead themselves during their four-year programme?’

The target population consisted of all the male student nurses from 1st to 4th year (n=151) following the R425 undergraduate diploma programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape. Data was collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews with 12 male learner nurses until saturation occurred. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of thematic analysis using Tesch’s eight-step method to generate themes, categories and sub-categories. The findings consisted of five themes:

Theme 1 – The peak experiences of the male student nurses relating to self-leadership occurred on multiple levels – academic, interpersonal, personally associated and practice-linked.

Theme 2 – Self-leadership was a process (at times difficult) of growth, adaptation and developing attitudes that culminated in building character.

 Theme 3 – Future aspirations included professional and educational aspects and interpersonal leadership.

Theme 4 – This revealed the qualities needed for attainment of future aspirations.

Theme 5 – The value of the programme was enhanced through educational, fellow student and practice support.

The conclusion of this study was that male learner nurses have the capacity to lead themselves as they displayed those characteristics identified for their self-leadership. Characteristics such as maturity, responsibility, advocacy, strong resolve, hard work, endurance and a willingness to sacrifice were identified by the participants. They employed the use of self-talk and they were able to make firm decisions, but they required guidance and active support from significant others such as family, friends, nurse supervisors, nurse educators and faculty.

The value of their training programme was enhanced by educational support from lecturers and mentors, fellow students and practice support in the wards and simulation laboratory. Guidelines for self-leadership for male learner nurses were described from the findings of this study.

Ethical considerations included obtaining informed consent from the participants, while ensuring confidentiality and anonymity. Ethical clearance to conduct this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee at the University of the Western Cape, Western Cape College of Nursing (WCCN) and Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). Trustworthiness was ensured throughout the research process through credibility, transferability, confirmability and dependability.

Keywords:
Best Experiences; Learner Nurses; Self-leadership
Repository Posting Date:
20-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
20-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17I02
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleSelf-Leadership in Male Learner Nurses during Their Training at a College in South Africaen_US
dc.title.alternativeEducation Strategies in Academiaen
dc.contributor.authorMia, Shahnaazen
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Tauen
dc.author.detailsShahnaaz Mia, MCur, RN, RM, Professional Experience: Clinical Educator/Mentor July 2008 –June 2015 Occupational Health Nursing Practitioner November 2004- June 2008 Field Supervisor 2004 Previously employed at the local authority for the City of Cape Town from 01/10/84- 31/05/2001 as a Senior Professional Nurse in Charg Author Summary: Currently, lecturing at the University of the Western Cape. Portfolio of clinical co-ordination 1st year students Clinical supervision 7 years at the Western Cape College of Nursing for 2nd, 3rd and 4th year diploma students Community nursing. 3 and a half years OHNP at a beverage manufacturing plant. Sister in charge in community health clinics in township areas "the Cape Flats"en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621546-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>Male learners in the nursing profession have been found to face self-leadership challenges. Self-leadership is an enabling process whereby a people learn to know themselves better and through this improved self-awareness, are better able to steer their work life. Self-leadership includes both personal and professional growth. It requires certain attributes such as maturity and endurance. This leads to the empowerment of the individual and to the fulfillment of goals and desires. The purpose of this study was to describe guidelines for male learner nurses on self-leadership during a four-year nursing programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape.</span></p> <p>The objectives of this study were to explore and describe the best experiences of self-leadership in male learner nurses during their four-year training programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape Province of the Republic of South Africa.</p> <p>A qualitative research design incorporating the philosophy of the Appreciative Inquiry paradigm was used. The research design was exploratory, descriptive and contextual to match the research questions.</p> <p>The research questions were framed from an AI perspective:</p> <p>‘What are the best experiences of male learner nurses on their self-leadership during their four-year programme?’</p> <p>‘How can male learner nurses lead themselves during their four-year programme?’</p> <p>The target population consisted of all the male student nurses from 1<sup>st</sup> to 4<sup>th</sup> year (n=151) following the R425 undergraduate diploma programme at a nursing college in the Western Cape. Data was collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews with 12 male learner nurses until saturation occurred. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of thematic analysis using Tesch’s eight-step method to generate themes, categories and sub-categories. The findings consisted of five themes:</p> <p>Theme 1 – The peak experiences of the male student nurses relating to self-leadership occurred on multiple levels – academic, interpersonal, personally associated and practice-linked.</p> <p>Theme 2 – Self-leadership was a process (at times difficult) of growth, adaptation and developing attitudes that culminated in building character.</p> <p> Theme 3 – Future aspirations included professional and educational aspects and interpersonal leadership.</p> <p>Theme 4 – This revealed the qualities needed for attainment of future aspirations.</p> <p>Theme 5 – The value of the programme was enhanced through educational, fellow student and practice support.</p> <p>The conclusion of this study was that male learner nurses have the capacity to lead themselves as they displayed those characteristics identified for their self-leadership. Characteristics such as maturity, responsibility, advocacy, strong resolve, hard work, endurance and a willingness to sacrifice were identified by the participants. They employed the use of self-talk and they were able to make firm decisions, but they required guidance and active support from significant others such as family, friends, nurse supervisors, nurse educators and faculty.</p> <p>The value of their training programme was enhanced by educational support from lecturers and mentors, fellow students and practice support in the wards and simulation laboratory. Guidelines for self-leadership for male learner nurses were described from the findings of this study.</p> <p>Ethical considerations included obtaining informed consent from the participants, while ensuring confidentiality and anonymity. Ethical clearance to conduct this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee at the University of the Western Cape, Western Cape College of Nursing (WCCN) and Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). Trustworthiness was ensured throughout the research process through credibility, transferability, confirmability and dependability.</p>en
dc.subjectBest Experiencesen
dc.subjectLearner Nursesen
dc.subjectSelf-leadershipen
dc.date.available2017-06-20T18:41:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-20-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T18:41:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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