Economics and Intimate Partner Violence: Reducing Risk Through Economic Solvency

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621561
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Economics and Intimate Partner Violence: Reducing Risk Through Economic Solvency
Other Titles:
Conversations on Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Gilroy, Heidi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Beta (Houston)
Author Details:
Heidi Gilroy, PhD, RN, APHN-BC, Professional Experience: Registered Nurse (14 years) Advanced Public Health Nurse-Board Certified (4 years) Grant project manager for evidence based longitudinal study to establish the outcomes of abused women who use justice services compared to shelter services (6 years) Primary investigator for economic solvency model development (1 year) Author Summary: Heidi Gilroy is a public health nurse whose areas of expertise include intimate partner violence and social determinants of health. She has worked for the past 6 years on the Mother Child Study, a longitudinal study to understand what happens to women and children after they seek help for intimate partner violence for the first time. She has also worked with groups around the world to build capacity for nurses doing research.
Abstract:

Purpose:

Poverty is one of the most consistent risk factors for intimate partner violence. However, little is known about the economic state at which women are no longer at risk for intimate partner violence due to their economic status, which can be referred to as economic solvency. In order to address poverty as a risk factor, we need to understand more about economic solvency. The purpose of this research is to validate a model of economic solvency in women and create a basis for measurement of economic solvency.

Methods:  

This is a mixed methods study. First, a quantitative study was performed to validate an established theoretical model of economic solvency, which is made up of four factors (human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, and independence). Next, a qualitative study was performed to find out how women described economic solvency and create a separate model to compare with the original model. For the quantitative analysis, data was used from an ongoing 7 year study of women who were applying for a protection order or using a safe shelter for the first time. For the qualitative analysis, women were recruited from area safe shelters. All women in the study had experienced intimate partner violence, spoke English or Spanish, and were at least 18 years old. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the quantitative data. The qualitative data was independently reviewed by 2 researchers and themes were noted and compared.  

Results:  

The model was a good fit for the data according to the confirmatory factor analysis. Qualitative inquiry revealed that women did describe human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, and independence as parts of economic solvency. They also described assets as an important factor that was not included in the original model. 

Conclusions:  

By comparing results from the quantitative and qualitative research, we created a five-factor model, which includes human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, independence, and assets. The results of this study support programs that address not only poverty in women who have experienced or at risk for intimate partner violence, but also the psychosocial issues that may be preventing them from escaping poverty. These programs should be multi-dimensional, addressing all factors of the model, in order to increase safety and decrease poor outcomes related to intimate partner violence. 

Keywords:
Economics; Intimate Partner Violence; Women's Health
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17L08
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEconomics and Intimate Partner Violence: Reducing Risk Through Economic Solvencyen_US
dc.title.alternativeConversations on Intimate Partner Violenceen
dc.contributor.authorGilroy, Heidien
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Beta (Houston)en
dc.author.detailsHeidi Gilroy, PhD, RN, APHN-BC, Professional Experience: Registered Nurse (14 years) Advanced Public Health Nurse-Board Certified (4 years) Grant project manager for evidence based longitudinal study to establish the outcomes of abused women who use justice services compared to shelter services (6 years) Primary investigator for economic solvency model development (1 year) Author Summary: Heidi Gilroy is a public health nurse whose areas of expertise include intimate partner violence and social determinants of health. She has worked for the past 6 years on the Mother Child Study, a longitudinal study to understand what happens to women and children after they seek help for intimate partner violence for the first time. She has also worked with groups around the world to build capacity for nurses doing research.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621561-
dc.description.abstract<p><span lang="EN"><strong>Purpose:</strong></span></p> <p><span lang="EN">Poverty is one of the most consistent risk factors for intimate partner violence. However, l</span>ittle is known about the economic state at which women are no longer at risk for intimate partner violence due to their economic status, which can be referred to as economic solvency. In order to address poverty as a risk factor, we need to understand more about economic solvency. <span lang="EN">The purpose of this research is to validate a model of economic solvency in women and create a basis for measurement of economic solvency.</span></p> <p><span lang="EN"><strong>Methods: </strong></span><span lang="EN"> </span></p> <p><span lang="EN">This is a mixed methods study. First, a quantitative study was performed to validate an established theoretical model of economic solvency, which is made up of four factors (human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, and independence). Next, a qualitative study was performed to find out how women described economic solvency and create a separate model to compare with the original model. For the quantitative analysis, data was used from an ongoing 7 year study of women who were applying for a protection order or using a safe shelter for the first time. For the qualitative analysis, women were recruited from area safe shelters. All women in the study had experienced intimate partner violence, spoke English or Spanish, and were at least 18 years old. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the quantitative data. The qualitative data was independently reviewed by 2 researchers and themes were noted and compared. </span><span lang="EN"> </span></p> <p><span lang="EN"><strong>Results: </strong></span><span lang="EN"> </span></p> <p><span lang="EN">The model was a good fit for the data according to the confirmatory factor analysis. Qualitative inquiry revealed that women did describe human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, and independence as parts of economic solvency. They also described assets as an important factor that was not included in the original model. </span></p> <p><span lang="EN"><strong>Conclusions: </strong></span><span lang="EN"> </span></p> <p><span lang="EN">By comparing results from the quantitative and qualitative research, we created a five-factor model, which includes human capital, social capital, sustainable employment, independence, and assets. The results of this study support programs that address not only poverty in women who have experienced or at risk for intimate partner violence, but also the psychosocial issues that may be preventing them from escaping poverty. These programs should be multi-dimensional, addressing all factors of the model, in order to increase safety and decrease poor outcomes related to intimate partner violence. </span></p>en
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectIntimate Partner Violenceen
dc.subjectWomen's Healthen
dc.date.available2017-06-21T13:18:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T13:18:30Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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