Diverse Educational Strategies Enhance Multigenerational Learning in the Classroom and Workplace

24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621568
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Title:
Diverse Educational Strategies Enhance Multigenerational Learning in the Classroom and Workplace
Other Titles:
Educational Learning Environment
Author(s):
Karl, Joyce I.; Pittman, Oralea
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Joyce I. Karl, DNP, MS, BSN, RN, ANP-BC, COHN-S; Oralea Pittman
Abstract:

Purpose

This presentation will examine similarities and differences among generations and how diverse educational strategies can be developed for the multigenerational classroom or workplace. It will also discuss how traditional, interactive, and problem-based intergenerational activities may benefit all participants.

Review of Literature

In the classroom, three generations are often present among the faculty and students; baby boomers, Generation X, and millennials (Generation Y). Although it is important to avoid assumptions about individuals, each group has values and skills which are different. Baby Boomers prefer structured learning. Hard work is the way to earn respect and advancement in the workplace (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).

As learners, Generation X want to know the relevance of information and the most efficient way of learning it. They are independent and skeptical. Their respect must be earned (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).

Millennials prefer learning with technology to reading from textbooks. They understand the half-life of knowledge is short, and want quick feedback. They learn best in active environments where they can practice what they are learning (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).

Educational strategies for multigenerational, multicultural cohorts promote reciprocal exchange of knowledge among participants so they can learn together and from each other. Instructors should explore their own generational identity/awareness and facilitate the same in students to enhance intergenerational communication, respect, learning, decision-making and conflict management (Sánchez & Kaplan, 2014). Content should start simple and build in complexity. Learning activities must be designed for growth in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. Problem-based learning strategies help students translate knowledge into practice and achieve professional clinical competencies (Distler, 2015). Student-centered approaches such as the flipped classroom have shown mostly positive or neutral outcomes compared with traditional approaches (Betihavas, Bridgman, Kornhaber, & Cross, 2016; Gillispie, 2016; Robinson, Scollan-Koliopoulos, Kamienski, & Burke, 2012)

Summary

Multiple teaching techniques are essential for successful intergenerational learning: traditional, active, cooperative and collaborative. Lectures and readings may still be appropriate for some content; but podcasts/webcasts, audio books, and e-books are also good options. Low stakes, self-reflection assignments and case-based or literature-based sessions as written assignments or blogs are appropriate for all learners. Attention grabbers such as guest speakers from the field, audience response systems, YouTube videos, Wikis, games, or video vignettes can enhance multigenerational engagement. Harnessing virtual and simulated activities using standardized patients and/or interprofessional teams with peer and faculty feedback together with actual clinical experiences shows promise for successful, competent nursing and advanced practice nursing graduates. We will share our experience utilizing several of the suggested strategies with nurse practitioner and interprofessional health students.

Implications for Practice

Intergenerational differences in learning styles and work styles are present in nearly every professional classroom, preceptorship, and practice. Understanding and appreciating the different attitudes and skills that different generations and professions bring to the relationships can increase student, faculty, and employee confidence and self-efficacy as they learn new skills from each other.

Keywords:
Education; Multigenerational; Problem-based Learning
Repository Posting Date:
21-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
21-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17O17
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.titleDiverse Educational Strategies Enhance Multigenerational Learning in the Classroom and Workplaceen
dc.title.alternativeEducational Learning Environmenten
dc.contributor.authorKarl, Joyce I.en
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Oraleaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJoyce I. Karl, DNP, MS, BSN, RN, ANP-BC, COHN-S; Oralea Pittmanen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621568-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Purpose</strong></p> <p><strong></strong>This presentation will examine similarities and differences among generations and how diverse educational strategies can be developed for the multigenerational classroom or workplace. It will also discuss how traditional, interactive, and problem-based intergenerational activities may benefit all participants.</p> <p>Review of Literature</p> <p>In the classroom, three generations are often present among the faculty and students; baby boomers, Generation X, and millennials (Generation Y). Although it is important to avoid assumptions about individuals, each group has values and skills which are different. Baby Boomers prefer structured learning. Hard work is the way to earn respect and advancement in the workplace (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).</p> <p>As learners, Generation X want to know the relevance of information and the most efficient way of learning it. They are independent and skeptical. Their respect must be earned (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).</p> <p>Millennials prefer learning with technology to reading from textbooks. They understand the half-life of knowledge is short, and want quick feedback. They learn best in active environments where they can practice what they are learning (Gallo, 2011; Gillispie, 2016).</p> <p>Educational strategies for multigenerational, multicultural cohorts promote reciprocal exchange of knowledge among participants so they can learn together and from each other. Instructors should explore their own generational identity/awareness and facilitate the same in students to enhance intergenerational communication, respect, learning, decision-making and conflict management (Sánchez & Kaplan, 2014). Content should start simple and build in complexity. Learning activities must be designed for growth in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. Problem-based learning strategies help students translate knowledge into practice and achieve professional clinical competencies (Distler, 2015). Student-centered approaches such as the flipped classroom have shown mostly positive or neutral outcomes compared with traditional approaches (Betihavas, Bridgman, Kornhaber, & Cross, 2016; Gillispie, 2016; Robinson, Scollan-Koliopoulos, Kamienski, & Burke, 2012)</p> <p>Summary</p> <p>Multiple teaching techniques are essential for successful intergenerational learning: traditional, active, cooperative and collaborative. Lectures and readings may still be appropriate for some content; but podcasts/webcasts, audio books, and e-books are also good options. Low stakes, self-reflection assignments and case-based or literature-based sessions as written assignments or blogs are appropriate for all learners. Attention grabbers such as guest speakers from the field, audience response systems, YouTube videos, Wikis, games, or video vignettes can enhance multigenerational engagement. Harnessing virtual and simulated activities using standardized patients and/or interprofessional teams with peer and faculty feedback together with actual clinical experiences shows promise for successful, competent nursing and advanced practice nursing graduates. We will share our experience utilizing several of the suggested strategies with nurse practitioner and interprofessional health students.</p> <p>Implications for Practice</p> <p>Intergenerational differences in learning styles and work styles are present in nearly every professional classroom, preceptorship, and practice. Understanding and appreciating the different attitudes and skills that different generations and professions bring to the relationships can increase student, faculty, and employee confidence and self-efficacy as they learn new skills from each other.</p>en
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectMultigenerationalen
dc.subjectProblem-based Learningen
dc.date.available2017-06-21T14:12:13Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T14:12:13Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository.-
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