2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/621573
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Combating Childhood Obesity With Provider Education: A Quantitative Study
Author(s):
Larery, Trina Marie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Epsilon
Author Details:
Trina Larery, DNP, MSN, RN, FNP-C, Professional Experience: 2015-Present-Research in Childhood Obesity 2016-Present-Assistant Professor at Pittsburg State University. 2009-2016-Rural Family Health Practice; Performed the assessment, evaluation and treatment of overweight and obese children and adults. 2015-Present; Member of the Obesity Society. Author Summary: I have been in the nursing profession for 21 years. The last 9 years were in family practice as a nurse practitioner. I worked in a rural health clinic caring for multiple obese and overweight children and adults. I managed the care from initial assessment to diagnosis and finally treatment and follow-up. I am currently an Assistant Professor at Pittsburg State University, in Pittsburg, KS in the School of Nursing.
Abstract:

The study included an educational program to providers and nurse practitioner students in order to evaluate whether an increase in knowledge and accuracy occurred based on knowledge of evidenced-based responses to specific indicators of childhood overweight and obesity. It assessed the providers’ knowledge and sought to evaluate if increased knowledge occurred after an educational program presentation. Following the educational program, a follow-up survey was distributed via email to assess the providers self-reported perceived practice change six weeks after the education. Part one measured if an increase in knowledge of the 5210 components, correct laboratory testing, and assessment of comorbidities occurred. The 5210 components include recommendations on activity, screen time, sugary drinks, and diet from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI). Improved accuracy in applying diagnostic criteria based on current evidenced-based practice guidelines in childhood obesity after the educational session was also evaluated. The second part of the study evaluated if a self-reported perceived practice change occurred six weeks post education. The target population was recruited from the 4-State APN (advanced practice nurse) conference in March 2016. A pretest was given to participants followed by a power point presentation and concluded with a posttest. Once the surveys were complete, a question and answer period followed. A t-test was conducted on the pretest and posttest results. A six week follow-up study was performed utilizing comparative analysis following the education. The follow-up surveys were distributed via email. The study concluded with statistical significance (p <0.05) that the education provided increased providers’ knowledge of current evidenced-based practice guidelines in childhood obesity. All participants (n=41) had an increase in posttest scores after the education was provided. Results from part two of the study indicated an increase in usage of the 5210 guideline components with patient education and an increase in comorbidity assessment. Current practice revealed low use and documentation of BMI, even though studies have established that the use of an accurate diagnosis of obesity is one of the highest indicators of treatment. Providers that participate in obesity related continuing education (CE) were found to be more familiar with the recommendations and have better adherence to current evidence-based practice guidelines. The findings of the study indicate that many providers are not aware of the current clinical practice guidelines in childhood obesity. Although information is readily available, providers must continuously update their knowledge to improve care for overweight and obese children. This study validates the need for continued educational programs for providers in childhood obesity.

Keywords:
childhood obesity; provider education; quantitative study
Repository Posting Date:
22-Jun-2017
Date of Publication:
22-Jun-2017
Other Identifiers:
INRC17PST
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
28th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Dublin, Ireland
Description:
Event Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarship

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCombating Childhood Obesity With Provider Education: A Quantitative Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarery, Trina Marieen
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Epsilonen
dc.author.detailsTrina Larery, DNP, MSN, RN, FNP-C, Professional Experience: 2015-Present-Research in Childhood Obesity 2016-Present-Assistant Professor at Pittsburg State University. 2009-2016-Rural Family Health Practice; Performed the assessment, evaluation and treatment of overweight and obese children and adults. 2015-Present; Member of the Obesity Society. Author Summary: I have been in the nursing profession for 21 years. The last 9 years were in family practice as a nurse practitioner. I worked in a rural health clinic caring for multiple obese and overweight children and adults. I managed the care from initial assessment to diagnosis and finally treatment and follow-up. I am currently an Assistant Professor at Pittsburg State University, in Pittsburg, KS in the School of Nursing.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/621573-
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The study included an educational program to providers and nurse practitioner </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">students in order to evaluate whether an increase in knowledge and accuracy occurred </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">based on knowledge of evidenced-based responses to specific indicators of childhood </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">overweight and obesity. It assessed the providers’ knowledge and sought to evaluate if </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">increased knowledge occurred after an educational program presentation. Following the </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">educational program, a follow-up survey was distributed via email to assess the providers </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">self-reported perceived practice change six weeks after the education. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Part one measured if an increase in knowledge of the 5210 components, correct </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">laboratory testing, and assessment of comorbidities occurred. The 5210 components </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">include recommendations on activity, screen time, sugary drinks, and diet from the </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Institute for Clinical Systems </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Improvement (ICSI). Improved accuracy in applying diagnostic criteria based on current </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">evidenced-based practice guidelines in childhood obesity after the educational session </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">was also evaluated. The second part of the study evaluated if a self-reported perceived </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">practice change occurred six weeks post education. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The target population was recruited from the 4-State APN (advanced practice </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">nurse) conference in March 2016. A pretest was given to participants followed by a </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">power point presentation and concluded with a posttest. Once the surveys were complete, </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">a question and answer period followed. A t-test was conducted on the pretest and posttest </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">results. A six week follow-up study was performed utilizing comparative analysis </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">following the education. The follow-up surveys were distributed via email. The study </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">concluded with statistical significance (p <0.05) that the education provided increased </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">providers’ knowledge of current evidenced-based practice guidelines in childhood </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">obesity. All participants (n=41) had an increase in posttest scores after the education was </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">provided. Results from part two of the study indicated an increase in usage of the 5210 </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">guideline components with patient education and an increase in comorbidity assessment. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Current practice revealed low use and documentation of BMI, even though studies </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">have established that the use of an accurate diagnosis of obesity is one of the highest </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">indicators of treatment. Providers that participate in obesity related continuing education </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">(CE) were found to be more familiar with the recommendations and have better </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">adherence to current evidence-based practice guidelines. The findings of the study </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">indicate that many providers are not aware of the current clinical practice guidelines in </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">childhood obesity. Although information is readily available, providers must </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">continuously update their knowledge to improve care for overweight and obese children. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">This study validates the need for continued educational programs for providers in </span><span style="font-size: 10pt;">childhood obesity.</span></p>en
dc.subjectchildhood obesityen
dc.subjectprovider educationen
dc.subjectquantitative studyen
dc.date.available2017-06-22T14:04:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-22-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T14:04:42Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name28th International Nursing Research Congressen
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen
dc.conference.locationDublin, Irelanden
dc.descriptionEvent Theme: Influencing Global Health Through the Advancement of Nursing Scholarshipen
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